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June 29, 1965 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I
PAGE TEN

'I'HL MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 29,1945

~AGE TEN TUE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JUNE 29.1965

'U' Gets $51.2 Million Budget-After A Hassle

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By JOHN MEREDITH
Administrators are in the pro-I
cess of making adjustments in
planned expenditures and sources
of revenue to bring the Universi-
ty's general funds budget into v
line with a $51.2 million state
appropriation.
The $51.2 million figure is $4.5-
million short of the amount re-
quested by the Regents-a fact
necessitating the current reas-
sessment of spending and financ-
ing. Except for tuition revenues,
the state appropriation provides
for virtually all of the day-to-
day costs of instruction at the
University.
In spite of this deficit, however,
the University has emerged from
a long legislative appropriations
battle in better shape than many
feared. At one time, the Legisla-
ture considered cutting the Uni- GOV. GEORGE ROMNEY
versity's share of state funds to G
$44.08 million, agreeing on $51.2 of the Governor's budget propo-
million only after 12 days of po- sals, and the question of higher
litical infighting. This figure will education appropriations was sent
become official as soon as Gov. to the Senate Appropriations Com-
George Romney signs the higher mittee.
education appropriations bill. The committee held hearings
Beginning for approximately two months,
The budget battle began last 'finally producing a recommenda-
February when Romney recom- tion basically similar to Romney's
mended only $50.43 million for the with two important exceptions: an
University, specifically excluding extra $900,000 was allocated to the
funds to support a freshman class university for faculty salaries and
at its Flint College branch this about $285,000 was included in
fall. the bill for Flint freshmen.
The Democrat-dominated Legis- Controversy
lature, however, quickly killed all The Flint appropriation was ap-
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rumors were circulating that dis-
sident committee members were
planning to cut the University's
appropriation.
Few observers were prepared,
however, for the budget appro-
proved by the committee on June
11. The University's allotment
was slashed by $6.27 million, and
it was revealed that an effort to
cut $10 million had been given
support by six committee mem-
bers.
Two rationales for the move
were presented. One faction, led
by Rep. George Montgomery Jr.
(D-Detroit), appeared to be se-
riously intent on reducing the
University's share of state support
for higher education. Montgomery
argued for a move toward equal-
izing the appropriations for Mich-
igan's three big universities-a
step which would leave the Uni-
versity with an appropriation of
only about $40 million.
Second Group
A second group, represented by
Rep. Charles Gray (D-Ypsilanti),
called the $6.27 million cutback a
purely political maneuver to gain
Democrats. Led by Lane, the Sen-
ate Appropriations Committee had
slashed or killed several House-

SPEAKER KOWALSKI

now*

proved only after considerable'
controversy. Romney based his op-
position to Flint expansion on the
argument that no such venture
should be undertaken until a pol-
icy decision on the relative merits
of branches and independent in-
stitutions is reached-a decision
which would presumably await
develnnoflno m f A. mnc nt. l-. fr-

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pen or a master plan orUARLANDLANE(U-kmnt),w passed spending measures, and n"s " ' " 1by a"""'' "" W "" " I
higher education in Michigan. House Democrats planned to use power play recently in the Legislature, surveys a copy of the
While many educators backed the University budget as a lever to state budget. Lane was threatened with a cut in University ap-
Romney's position, Appropriatia- force reconsideration of some of propriations-in which he has a vital interest-unless he passed
tions Committee Chairman Gar- these bills. Gray maintained that several bills from his committee.
land Lane (D-Flint) staunchly he had no intention of perma--
defended the University's lans nently reducing the University's EDUCA TORS lMEET:
to expand Flint. He referred the budget.
matter to the new State Board of In any case, the House leader-
Education which, while firmly op-shipdid not join the dissident
psnFlnexasocneelgru.that it was too late to try to stop group.cm mn d
admittance of freshmen at Flint Ways and Means Committee
this fall. With the long-run impli- Chairman Einar Earlandsen (D-
cations of the issue still unre- Escanaba) had opposed the cut-
solved, the Appropriations Com- back from the start, and House udnF rdm
mittee followed the board's rec- Speaker Joseph Kowalski (D-De-
ommendations and added the troit) vowed to do everything in
$285,000. his power to restore the $6.27 mil- By The Associated Press
The $51.2 million appropriation lion to the University's budget. NEW YORK-College administrators should give students more
was approved by the Senate on The turning point seemed to power in running schools in order to harness the youthful Idealism
May 18, and the higher educa- come on June 16, when a Demo- and enthusiasm manifested in recent country-wide protests.
tion bill went to the House Ways cratic caucus vote went against That's the opinion of a panel of experts who probed the current
and Means Committee. There it the cutback's supporters. After decade of discontent yesterday at the annual convention of the Na-
Iran into trouble. that, their support quickly dwin- tional Education Association.
Rumors' died, and the next day the HousetinlEuaonAscto.
.. e h cmittee die-,uanu oten da infosa They suggested that student leaders be given a greater role in
Despite the committee ciiair- unanimouslye dain an informa lpigrnteceeo nvriy
man's expressed intent to merely session to restore all of the $63.27! helping run the college or university.
look over the Senate bill for tecr- million. Ahead of Adults
nical errors and,at most, make A final vote on June 27 gave of- "Sometimes in terms of .. . idealism and just good sense, student
several minor changes, by June 9 ficial approval to full restoration. groups have shown themselves considerably ahead of adults," said
_--_ ___E. K. Fretwell Jr., Dean for Aca-
demic Development of the City
College of New York.
Thomas H. Hamilton, president
of the University of Hawaii in a
paper presented to the meeting
said college administrators have
limited the powers of student gov-
ernments.
Honesty
Hamilton said the colleges must
be honest with students "as to
what powers they do have and
which powers the governing board,
faculty or administration re-
serves."
Dr. Dana L. Farnsworth, direc-
tor of University Health Services
at Harvard, said student rebellion
can be guided into constructive
lines if college authorities "treat
students with scrupulous fainess
at all times, listen to their com-
plaints, no matter how trivial, and
act with consistency on matters
of student concern."
Hamilton and Farnsworth both
warned that the older generation
can't fairly judge today's young
people on the basis of their own
experiences.
Hamilton said, "I am as I am,
and I think as I think, partly be-
cause I was a young man at the
time of the Great Depression. My
son is as he is, and thinks as he
thinks, partly because he did not
have that experience but did
march at Selma."

I

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