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June 23, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-06-23

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23,1965

i'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 1 9 6 5 THE MICHIGAN DAILX PA4~iE

i Lim/aii ii.1

NAACP Invades Alabama'

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. ()P) - The
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People -
banned in Alabama for eight years
-has begun its first major civil
rights protest since it won appro-
val to operate under a court order.
The project is statewide Negro
voter registration.
Its goals: 100,000 more register-
ed Negro voters in Alabama by
the summer's end, creation of
stronger county leadership among
Negroes, and a new image for
Alabama.
NAACP chapter leaders and
businessmen - both white and
Negro-were among the estimated
100 civil rights volunteers who
officially began the voter cam-
paign Monday by attending the
opening of a two day work-shop
period.
The NAACP was outlawed in
Alabama for eight years. It re-
gained status in 1964 after a
lengthy fight in the courts when
the U.S. Supreme Court ruled
unanimously that Alabama had

no constitutional basis for ban-
ning the organization.
Immediate Integration
In Houston, Tex., while about
2,000 Negroes attended-a rally
calling for immediate integration
of all grades, Houston public,
school trustees voted last night
for complete desegregation by
1967.
A loud but orderly crowd gath-
ered in Emancipation Park to
hear civil rights leaders urge im-
mediate total desegregation.
The original stairstep integra-
tion plan was ordered by a U.S.
district court in 1961.
Pools Closed
In Griffin, Ga., city officials
closed public swimming pools and
youth centers to prevent integra-
tion yesterday and the Justice
Department immediately began
an investigation under the Civil
Rights Act..
Shortly after the city's two
pools and two youth, centers --
maintained separately for Negroes
and whites-were closed, the Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation said

in nearby Atlanta its agents were
investigating.
The FBI said results of the in-
vestigation would be turned over
to the Justice Department.
An announcement from the
office of city manager Jack Lang-
ford said the facilities were closed
at the direction of the city com-
mission to keep peace in the com-
munity of about 23,000 persons.

National,
Roundup
By The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif.

- Gov.

Edmund G. Brown sharply criti-
cized yesterday last week's report
of a state senate subcommittee
that claimed the student rebellion
at University of= California was
controlled by Communists.
* * *
WASHINGTON - A bill that
would require cigarette manufac-
turers to include on -every pack
a warning that smoking may be
a health hazard was passed by
the House yesterday by voice vote.
The House .refused, however, to
permit the Federal Trade Com-
mission to require any such warn-
ing in cigarette advertising. Its
bill also would ban state and local
authorities from t requiring any
warnings.
NEWARK, N.J.-Jubilant police-
men ended five days of picketing
at Newark's city hall yesterday
after Mayor ,Hugh J. Addonizio
recommended reinstatement of a
white patrolman who fatally shot
a Negro motorist.
The reinstatement, made offi-
cial by police director Dominick
A. Spina, came after the Newark
human rights commission said its
investigation indicated there was
no evidence of racial prejudice in
the case.
NEW YORK-The stock market
has declined in two consecutive
sessions after a three-day advance.

Algiers Riot
Protests in
Third .Day
ALGIERS OP) - Hundreds of
youths surged into downtown Al-
giers last night in the third day
of rioting in support of deposed
President Ahmed Ben Bella.
The new outbreak came as Col.
Houari Boumedienne's strongman
regime deployed security forces in
the capital and other key points
in the nation in an effort to avert
further violence that might inter-
fere with the upcoming African-
Asian conference.
Boumedienne's regime officially
admitted for the first time that
Ben Bella and five of his chief
lieutenants were under arrest.
The new rioting began when
hundreds of the deposed presi-
dent's supporters tried to march
on the center of Algiers.
In Cairo, some 200 Algerian stu-
dents also demonstrated against
Ben Bella's ouster and demanded
his release.
The first official word of Ben
Bella's fate came in an announce-
ment in the Algerian government
newspaper Alger Ce Soir. In addi-
tion to Ben Bella, it said Hadj
Ben Allah, former president of
the national assembly and a close
associate of the deposed president,
was among those arrested. Ben
Allah earlier had been reported
killed in a scuffle resisting arrest.
Across
Cam pus
FRIDAY, JUNE 25
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.--The Cinema
Guild will present Charlie Chaplin
and Paulette Goddard in "Mod-
ern Times" in the Architecture
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The Freedom Singers
will perform in Trueblood Aud.
SATURDAY, JUNE 26
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present Charlie Chaplin
and Paulette Goddard in "Mod-
ern Times" in the Architecture
Aud.

NEW YORK {A' - Merchants
looked yesterday for a buying
spurt to follow President Lyndon
B. Johnson's signing of the excise
tax cut.
The new tax law eliminated or
reduced 10 per cent taxes on such
items as major appliances, furs,
jewelry, automobiles and cos-
metics.
The biggest savings will be on
purchase of automobiles. General
Motors Corp., Chrysler Corp., and
Ford Motor Co. immediately be-
gan mailing applications for re-
funds to 830,000 car purchasers
since May 15.
The tax legislation reduced the
10 per cent federal excise tax on
new cars to 7 per cent with the
cut retroactive to May 15.
Increased Buying
Macy's, New York department
store chain, reported "definite

indication of increased buyiig
activity and interest" since it re-
moved the taxes on major appli-
ances and other items last Friday.
Tiffany's, New York jewelry
company, cut the price of its fam-
ed Tiffany diamond from $1 mil-
lion to $900,000.
Most merchants surveyed indi-
cated they would heed President
Johnson's plea to pass the tax cut
along to consumers. There was
some question about how much of
the tax levied at the wholesalers'
level would be passed on to, re-
tailers.
Stanley Marcus, president of
Neiman-Marcus, Dallas depart-
ment store, said, "Lots of trans-
actions were held up as people
recognized that the taxes were go-
ing to be removed. So we believe
lots of business will be consumated
that was in the process."

Ben Litshy of Zale Jewelry Co.,
Dallas - based chain, commented:
"All we can go on is what hap-
pened when the excise tax was re-
duced from 20 to 10 per cent in
1954. We had quite an improve-
ment in sales."
Most department stores in Bos-,
ton advertised that they would
give the customer the full benefit
of the tax cuts. Spokesmen for
Sears, Roebuck and Gilchrist's de-
partment stores said their new
prices on items affected are lower
than the amount of the taxes.
John Baker, general manager'
of Hecht & Co., Baltimore, said
he expected the effect of the tax
cut to be gradual.
"Though it applies to cosmetics,
I don't expect the average house-
wife to drop everything and dash
down to buy three extra lipsticks,"
he said.

Excise Cut To Stimulate Business Activity

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DAILY OFFICIAL- BULLETI'N

In Portland, Ore., the Interns
Revenue Service reported that :
had been swamped with calls fror
retailers and consumers about ta
cuts and methods of refunds. .
spokesman for Zayre departmen
store said they were getting a larg
number of inquiries about price
of refrigerators and color televi
sion sets.
Joseph Ross, president of David
son Brothers of Detroit, whic
operates 60 stores in three states
said: "We believe that signing c
the excise tax reduction will hav
a salutary effect upon business.
"This will be a stimulation t
business generally," commente
Joseph C. Hickingbotham, chair
man of Shreve and Co., Sa
Francisco jeweler. "Considerabl
buying has been withheld for th
last six months, waiting for th
end of excise."

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the Oay preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organisation notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23
Day Calendar
American Guild of Organists Regional
Convention-Hill Aud., 8:30 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Training Systems Institute -
Geary A. Rummier, director, "Using
the Systems Approach to Direct Train-
ing and Manpower Activities": Mich-
igan Union, 8:30 a.m.
American Guild of Organists Con-
vention. Recital-Marilyn Mason, School
of Music, and University of Michigan
Chamber Orchestra, Josef Blatt, con-
ductor: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Grades-Spring Term - Grades for
the spring half term should be return-
ed to the Registrar's Office within 48
hours after the examination. This office

will assist in the grade collection by
having regular messenger service on
Fri., June 25; Mon., June 28, and
Tues., June 29, to departmental offices
in the central campus area,
Doctoral Examination for Gisela
Maria Fuhrmann Ritchie. Germanic
Languages & Literatures; thesis: "Car-
oline Schlegel-Schelling in blographi-
schen Roman," Fri., June 25, 1084
Frieze, 3 p.m. Chairman, Martin Dyck.
Astronomical Colloquium - Wed.,
June 23, 4 p.m., Room 807, Physics-
Astronomy Bldg. Mr. George L. With-
broe, Dept. of Astronomy, "An Analysis
of CH in the Solar Atmosphere."
Regents' Meeting, July 23-Communi-
cations for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands
not later than July 9.
NrSF Advanced Science Education
Program Instructions for applying to
NSF for support of Advanced Science
Seminars, Graduate Development Pro-
jects. and Public , Understanding of
Science Projects are contained in a
booklet which may be consulted in the
Office of Associate Dean Freeman D.
Miller, Room 118 Rackham Bldg.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Chicago Board of Health - Research
Assistantship. Degree, bkgd. in Physi-
ology for heart disease control research.
State of Michigan-Educ. & Educ.

Guidance Counselors. Mich. teacher's
cerif. and M.A. 1-5 yrs. related exper.
determines rating. Applic. deadline July
12. Also many nursing positions-grad
nurses, psychiatric nurse supv., surgi-
cal nurse, etc. Active registration req.
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Jacl-
son, Mich.-Chemist or Chem. Engr. for
Process Dev. Dept.
City School District, Rochester, N.Y.
-Jr. Accountant. 2 yrs. college aectg.
plus 4 yrs. exper. or equiv. comb, of
trng. and exper. Familiar with punch
card acctg. system.

Michigan Tech. Univ., Houghton -
Asst. for News Bureau. Degree pit
good writing ability. Exper. desirabl
will consider exceptional senior. Cove
all types of gen'l. univ. news-no sport
Local Organization, Ann Arbor-J
or Sr. Electronics Tech. Immed. oper
ing for digital control and compute
tech. Engrg. degree plus exper. in dig
ital modular systems and logical des.
* * *
For further information, please ca
764-7460, General Div.. Bureau of Al
pointments, 3200 SAB.

GET YOUR
COURSE OUTLINES for EXAMS
Hy-Marx's
College Outlne Series

'. .
J B}
Congress has voted,
the President has
signed; now there is
no federal excise tax
on purses, jewelry,
clocks and silverwar
OHN B. L
Phone NO 8-6779 * 601

NIN
4 '..

SCHA UM'S
CLIFF'S NOTES
STUDYMASTER
MONARCH

S

OL

i .

DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT

e.

"YOU'LL HOLD YOUR SIDES LAUGHING !"-Newsweek

EIDY
East Liberty

THAT WHOOP-T-UP
FUNNY WESTERNI

COWMMIA PICTURS Peswils .«,:f"
mommulincOIU M IA ISR

%em VIRGININ
State Street on Campus RESTAURANT Phone NO 3-3441
SPECIAL DINNER-THIS WEEK ONLY
BROILED PETITE 4
NEW YORK STRIP STEAK
Garnished with Onion rings, Whipped Potatoes, Tossed $150
Garden Salad, Roll and Butter, Delicious Coffee .
SUMMER HOURS
7 A.M.-8 P.M. Daily Closed Sunday

all available at
S LATERS
336 S. State

'

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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER

Coming
Thursday

"RATTLE OF A SIMPLE MAN"
and "BATTLE OF THE SEXES"

presents

I

STREEITDANCE

G. M

Shows at
1:00-3:30-6:15-8:50
Feature 20 Minutes Lat

FREE
SAT., JUNE 26... 811 P.M.

RAIN DATE:

JUNE 27...8-11

P.M.

ON S. INGALLS STREET
"BY LEAGUE FOUNTAIN"
featuring-
THE IGUANAS
FREE

IMI R RE
GEOrMAN CA. RISO NU P
Georg C. Scott 0 Jeanne Moreau 0 Alain Delon

N U
DON'T FORGET
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CINEMAGUILD
' This Weekend
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in
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N THE ARCHITECTURE AUOITORIUM
' AOMISSION: FIFTY C ENTS

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Even the pens work better at

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Starting Today
Shows Start at
1:00-2:55-4:50-6:45 & S

lw

ANN ARBOR BANK
3 CAMPUS OFFICES
" East Liberty Street Near Maynard
" South University at East University
" Plymouth Road at Huron Parkway
And 4 More Offices Serving
ANN ARBOR / DEXTER
WHITMORE LAKE

HAVE A DATE EVERY
SATURDAY NIGHT
You'll finally be able to afford to, if you get
a Honda.
Trade in your gas-eater for a thrifty Honda
50. Up to 200 miles per gallon, and at least
that many laughs. Maybe more.
Hondas are just the ticket for campus traffic
and campus parking, and you'll notice a big
difference in your pocketbook, too. It'll
bulge for a change.
And so will your date book.

20th Contufy-Fox, presents
FRANK SINATREMA
ITR hE VO R HO0WAR D

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Din

e

Out

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Old fleidelberg
211-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.

For your dining pleasures ...
Our menu features:
ELEGANT SEAFOOD NEWBERGS
lobster, crabmeat, shrimp in our own
zesty sherry newberg sauce
VEAL SCALLOPINE, MARSALA
sauteed veal in a rich marsala wine sauce
FRESH BROOK TROUT
from Snake River, sauteed with a delicate dressing
FILET OF RED SNAPPER
broiled to a turn and topped with a delicate
pinat Chardonnay wine sauce
' BROILED LIVE MAINE LOBSTER
U.S. PRIME STEAKS
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF

Hours: Daily 1 1 A.M.-2 A.M.

Closed Mondays

I

i

.. .., - ..

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