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May 06, 1965 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-06

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'THURSDAY, MAY 6,11965
SENATE HESITATES:
House OK's VIet Nam Funds

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ip~lw.ivt

TH MC IG N DAL +a .al! ala s R/

Ask Shift in Teaching Method

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - As fighting
continued in South Viet Nam yes-
terday, the House of Represen-
tatives voted quick approval of
President Lyndon B. Johnson's re-
quest for $700 million for the
Vietnamese conflict and the Sen-
ate prepared for controversy over
the measure today.
Many senators announced that
they will approve of the measure,
but several expressed misgivings
about having their votes inter-
preted as "blanket approval for
waging . undeclared war any-
where." That was the way Sen.
George D. Aiken (R-Vt) put it.
Leading the opposition, Sen.
Wayne Morse (D-Ore) said John-
son "from his own lips" had told
Congress the extra $700 million is
not needed.
"He is using you," Morse shout-
ed to his colleagues. Morse de-
nounced what he called "this un-
declared war in Asia" and said
"we are following a policy of in-
ternational outlawry."
Roll Call
House Republicans and Den-
crats ran up a 408 to 7 roll call
vote in support of Johnson's ap-
peal Tuesday for a demonstra-
tion that "we will do whatever
must be done to ensure the safe-
ty of South Viet Nam from ag-
gression."
All seven of the opposing House
votes were cast by Democrats:
Reps. George E. Brown, Jr. of Cal-
ifornia, Philip Burton of Califor-
nia, John Conyers, Jr. of Michi-

-Associated Press
A COMMUNIST P-T BOAT smolders in waters off Quang Khe
naval base in North Viet Nam after being hit in a day-long attack
by U.S. Navy planes. One of the plane's shadows glides over the
wreck in the center. Navy officials reported four other boats de-
stroyed in action some 50 miles north of the 17th parallel.

By BRUCE WASSERSTEIN
The curricular reform move-
ment of the 1950's brought about
innovations in the teaching of
both science and foreign lan-
guages. Following in the spirit of
this movement the report of the
College E n t r a n c e Examination
Board's Commission on English,
issued this week, advocates an
overhauling of the English teach-
ing conditions and qualifications
of secondary schools.
The commission said that fewer
than half of the English teachers
in the school system majored in
English in college. To assure more
qualified teachers, the report
urged that certification to teach
high school English be based at a
minimum of work in the following
areas:
Courses
-Formal study of the history
and structure of the English lan-
guage;
-Study in rhetoric and compo-
sition above the level of the fresh-
man course;
-Work in critical theory and
practice with attention to biblio-
graphy and library resources;
-Two semester c o u r s e s in
American literature;
-Four semester courses in Eng-
lish literature, of which one should
be the study of a single writer
(preferably Shakespeare) in
depth, and of which others should
represent approaches not exclu-
sively historical;
-At least one course in English
social and cultural history;
-Enough study of one foreign
language to guarantee reading
facility.
In addition to these minimal re-
quirements in subject matter, the
commission said that English
teachers should include the fol-
lowing in preparations for their
profession:
Cognates
-One course in the psychology
of learning;
--One course in the methodo-
logy of the subject (selection of
materials, lesson planning, cur-

riculum development, review of1
relevant research) ;
-One course in the history of
American educational theory and
institutions;
-One semester of full-time
practice teaching under close and;
competent supervision.
Noting that English teachers
have an average of five classes a
day with an average of 28 stu-
dents in a class, the commission3
said that many teachers are over-{
loaded with work and cannot ade-
quately deal with their pupils.
Machines
Furthermore, English teachers,
according to the report, often find1
themselves overworked because of
their sponsorship of too" manyR
extracurricular activities, and thef
lack of adequate help in perform-<
ing secretarial functions such asj
mimeographing exams.
As a solution to these problems,
the commission made the follow-f
ing recommendations:
-Space should be provided for
an English office equipped with ax
Across
Ca-mpus
THURSDAY, MAY 6
8 p.m.--Crest will sponsor a
travel lecture in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
Orchestra under the direction of
Eugene Ormandy and featuring
soprano Leontyne Price will per-
form in Hill Aud. This is one of
the May Festival Concerts.
FRIDAY, MAY 7
8:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
Orchestra, under the direction of
Thor Johnson, and the University
Choral Union Youth Chorus will
perform in Hill Aud. Featured will
be Janice Harsanyi, soprano,
Maureen Forrester, contralto,
Murray Dickie, tenor, Anshel
Brusilow, violin, Joseph De Pas-
quale, viola.

typewriter and a duplicating ma-
chine and clerical assistance
should be available for manual
duties;
-English teachers should be
assigned no more than four classes
a day;
-Average class size should be
no more than 25 pupils;
-The English teacher should be
responsible for supervision of no
more than one continuing extra-
curricular activity during a school
year.
The report also emphasized the
importance of mechanical equip-
me-it to aid the teaching of Eng
lish.
The report emphasized that in
addition to an annual budget for
a school library, at least $1 per
student per year should be allotted
for purchase and rental of special
equipment (slides, photographs,
films).
The commission said it hoped
that its recommendations would
be as effective in bringing about
reform as similar study groups
had been in other fields such as
math and science.

By The Associated Press
HAYNEVILLE, Ala.-Collie Le-
roy Wilkins Jr., who is be.ing tried
for the night-rider slaying of Mrs.
Viola Liuzzo was linked to the
murder weapon yesterday in Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation tes-
timony.
An FBI plant in the Ku Klux
Klan who was driving with Wil-
kins said he thought bullets from
Wilkins' revolver killed the civil
rights worker. Cross examining re-
vealed the FBI-informant did
nothing to stop the shooting.
BERKELEY, Calif.-Hundreds'
of University of California stu-
dents marched on the Berkeley
Draft Board headquarters yester-
day and presented the board co-
ordinator with a black coffin.
Forty students burned their draft
cards.
The march was a "symbolic pro-
test" against "the invasion of the
Dominican Republic," a spokes-
man said.
* *
NEW ORLEANS, La.-Missis-

sippi Gov. Paul Johnson and his
predecessor Ross Barnett were
freed yesterday of criminal con-
tempt charges connected with
their 1962 attempts to bar Negro
James Meredith from entering the
University of Mississippi.
A Federal Appeals Court voted
4-3 yesterday to drop the charges,
although two judges voiced vig-
orous opposition to the decision.
RAWALOPINDI, Pakistan-The
Pakistan government claimed to-
day that 20 more Indian troops
have been killed in three encoun-
ters near the Kashmir cease-fire
line.
A statement alleged that In-
dians violated the line Sunday by
shooting at civilians.
* * *
LONDON-Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson expressed hope today
that the lull in fighting in the
Rann of Kutch may prove "pre-
liminary to a cease-fire and the
settlement of this whole question."

gan, John G. Dow of New York,
Don Edwards of California, Edith
Green of Oregon, and William
Fitts Ryan of New York.
Meanwhile, U.S. Army para-
troopers, fresh from Okinawa, dug
in at two South Viet Nam air
bases while U.S. Marines, who ar-
rived in March, killed eight Viet
Cong in their most successful
combat patrol of the year.
Transports Arrive
C-130 transport planes also fer-

DAILY OFFICAL BULLETIN

ried in 1200 men of the 173rd
Airborne Brigade for duty expect-
ed to be similar to that of the
Marines-defense in depth of key
installations, plus a sprinkling of
offensive operations.
The rest of the 3500-man bri-
gade, the first American army
ground combat force committed to
South Viet Nam, is expected short-
ly. The buildup, officially explain-
ed as intended to free Vietnamese
garrison troops for combat, is in-
creasing the U.S. military rolls
to 36,000.
In London, ministers of the
Southeast Asia Treaty Organiza-
tion failed to agree on how to de-
feat the rebels' efforts to take
over South Viet Nam.
A majority of the eight-nation
alliance-led by the United States
and Britain-backed Johnson's
call for sterner military action
"until the Communist aggression
is brought to an end."
But Pakistan rejected that ma-
jority position. Pakistan was con-
cerned over consequences of con-
tinuance of the conflict and voic-
ing the hope determined efforts
will also be made "to restore peace
in that area through negotiations
on the basis of the existing Gene-
va agreements,"

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitt of Michigan, for which The ,
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore ,2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, MAY 6
Day Calendar
Institute for Continuing Legal Edu-
cation Conference-Carl Hawkins, asso-
ciate professor of law; Jerold Israel,
associate professor of law, "Michigan
Civil Procedure Before Trial": Rack-
ham Bldg., 9 a.m.
CREST Travel Lecture-Aud. A, An-
gell Hall, 8 p.m.
Mar Festival Concert-The Philadel-
phia, Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, con-
ductor; Leontyne Price, soprano; Hill
Aud., 8:30 p.rr.
General Notices
Student Organizations: Registration
of recognized student organizations
planning to be active during the
Spring/Summer Term must be com-
pleted by May 26, 1965. Forms are
available in. the Office of Student Af-
fairs, 1011 Student Activities Bldg. Priv-
ileges such as the use of the Organi-
zation Announcement column in The
Michigan Daily, use of meeting rooms
in University buildings, assignment of
L\ Student Activities Bldg. facilities, etc.
are available to registered organizations
only.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Social Security Admin., Baltimore,
Md.-Service Repres. Handle inquiries
In regard to benefits. 2 yrs. college, 2
yrs. related exper. or comb. of educ.
& exper. Opportunity for advancement.
Schumacher & Forelle, Inc.,Great
Neck, N.Y.-Attn.: 'Recent grads -
Construction Exec. Trainees, BS Engrg.
or Arch., MBA or MS in Engrg. Trng.
includes estimates, plans, scheduling
jobs, etc. and leads to mgmt. of proj-
ects.
Local Community Organization _
'Nursery School Director, teaching cer-
tificate, plus 15 hours study in child
dev. & admin. ability. Also bookkeeper-
secretary, good typing skill. Immed.
openings. Man or woman.
Crucible Steel Co., Detroit - Sales
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring/Summer Term
must be registered in the Office o
Student Affairs by May 26, 1965. Forms
are available in Room 1011 Student
Activities Bldg.
14 IINSTANT SILENCE I

Repres. Immed., opening for grad in
any field for inside sales; Exper. not
req. Military obligation fulfilled.
Ford Motor Co., Transmission &
Chassis Div., Livonia, Mich.-Produc-
tion Foreman. BA any field, some gen-
eral work exper. At least 21. 6-8 mos.
trng.
Inland Steel Co., Chicago - Art &
Prod. Ass't. Degree in graphic des. or
commercial art, 1 yr. exper. pref. Design
& prod. graphic projects for indus.
advtg.
Mich. Chemical Mfr.-Lab Analyst. 1-
2yrs.= Chem., Ch. or Mech. Engrg. for
control and product analyses. Lab. ex-
per, helpful. Age 20's. Immed. opening.
* * s
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

BRING THE LITTLE WOMAN... MAYBE SHE'LL DIE LAUGHING!
JACK LEMMON
ERNA LI
URDERn
YOUR WIFE"
TECHNICOLOR'eissed thIv UNITED ARTISTS
ENDS DIAL
TONIGHT CHIGAN 5-629
Winner of 3 ACADEMY AWARDS

S MAD!MAD!I MADRAS!
fA *.
r ytiEv

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DIAL Shows Start at
662-6264 P~ 1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00 and 9:05
~JQON STURGES WHO GAVE YOU'THE GREAT ESCAPE"
NOW B lrNGS YOU THE ULTIMATE IN SUSPENSE!
GEORGE MAHARIS
RICHARD BASEHARI
ANNE FRANCIS
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"A HUGE AND BOLD PORTRAYAL!"
-Bosley Crowther, N. Y. Times

4TH
WEEK !

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FRIDAY, MAY 7

DINNER-FILM-THEATRE SERIES
"A RAISIN IN THE SUN"

ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATES-IRENE PAPAS
iC-AELCACOYANNIS PRODUCTION
"ZORBATHEGREEK"
-

Shows at
6:40 and
9:08

Dial
8-6416

sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Staff at the U of M
Place: Presbyterian Campus Center
1432 Washtenaw-French Room

'ZORBA THE GREEK'

i

6:30-Dinner
7:15-Film
both for $1.00

Reservations: 662-3580
Discussion following film

I

out of the bag!

-ALL

STUDENTS WELCOME

.............
lrt
1
i j .'

.. .
= Yp.
"Why Grandmother, what big
interest you get on savings at

'
.:.
:;;,
'.*
.
:
:z

I

Detroit Free Press
May 5th

"Cat Ballou" is the kook-
iest Western I ever saw, a
comedy with Jane Fonda
and Lee Marvin (he plays
two parts) which Harold
Hecht produced. You'll love
Nat King Cole, a troubadour
with Stubby Kaye - They
sing the narration. Everyone
will want to see him. His one
ambition was to star in a
picture, but he never lived to
see himself. The picture
(which has its Midwest pre-
miere this Friday at Ann
Arbor's Michigan Theatre
and East Lansing's Campus
Theatre) has many quaint
touches by Elliot Silverstein.
It was his first Hollywood
film. He'll be with us a long
time.

Y

For information write:
Academic Aids, Box 969
Berkeley, California
94701

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