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June 10, 1965 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-06-10

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 10, 1965

FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, JUNE 10, 1965

HR USHCHEV CONFERENCE:

Stevenson Chides UNI

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN ORGANIZATION

Military Myth Explored

By JOHN MEREDITH
EDITOR'S NOTE: Seven experts
on the Soviet Union participated in
the University's "Conference on the
Khrushchev Era and After" last
weekend. The following is the third
article in a five-part series report-
ing the last five speeches of the
conference. The first two were cov-
ered in Friday's Daily.
"The fall of Khrushchev was
signalled by a temporary meeting
of the minds between the military
and other important segments of
the Soviet power echelon," Prof.
John Erickson of the University
of Manchester asserted at last
weekend's "Conference on the
Khrushchev Era and After."
From the military point of view,
Khrushchev was putting the USSR
in a straight jacket and the lead-
ership felt compelled to act, he
said.
Three Periods
Erickson divided the Khrush-'
chev era into three military per-
iods. The tone of the first period
-1953-'56-was set by the post-
Stalin power struggle during which
Khrushchev abegan attempts to
build his image as a military' hero
and strategist. It was marked by
the beginning of a military de-
bate between traditionalists and

radicals, Erickson said, with the
radicals, like Khrushchev, em-
phasizing the need to exploit re-
cent technological advances in
armaments.
In 1957, he noted, the second
phase of Khrushchev's associa-
tion with the military was ushered
in, as the premier emerged as
the leader of the now dominant
radicals and further built up his
personal military image by en-
hancing his wartime experiences
at Stalingrad.
Basing their program on the
assumption that the West can be
deterred, Soviet leaders became
increasingly dependent on nuclear
power at the expense of conven-
tional forces. While the shift to-
ward modern weapons was inevit-
able, Erickson pointed out that the
Russian program demonstrated
overconfidence and simplisme on
the part of its masterminds. At
this point, he said, the military
leaders kept silent; Khrushchev
had "pre-empted" them.
Tide Turns
In 1961, however, the tide be-
gan to turn,rand the third period
of the Khrushchev era began.
Erickson pointed to a June mili-
tary show as clear evidence that
Khrushchev was staking his pres-

NOW

4EM

DIAL
8-6416

tige on modern technology as the
core of Russian military strategy
-a position of invaluable aid to
the radicals but potentially dan-
gerous to the premier.
Yet, Erickson said, there was
evidence that even Khrushchev's
military backers were beginning
to see a danger in overemphasing
modern means of warfare and in
the dominance of Khrushchev's
own thinking in military deci-
sions.
The Cuban crisis, as a glaring
failure of the premier's strategy,
gave impetus to these trends. It
precipitated a debate on the use
of military weapons, Erickson
commented, and Khrushchevad-
mitted that some revisions were
in order.
However, he said, Khrushchev
had returned to a more rigid po-
sition by May 1963, and in De-
cember he announced a further
reduction in conventional forces.
It then became obvious that the
radicals were alienated from
rKhushchev, as they joined the
traditionalists in attacks on the
premier.
In September Khrushchev
"emasculated the ground forces,
reducing the ground forces com-
mand to the level of a training
command"-the move which im-
mediately preceded the premier's
removal.
The military leaders apparently
feared, Erickson said, that
Khrushchev was committing Rus-
sia to an inflexible and dangerous
dependence on modern warfare
techniques.
Responsibility Limited
"In a sense," he explained,
Khrushchev's responsibility was,
limited. The shift toward nu-
clear power, the escalation of
weapons and the revision in mili-
tary policy were not entirely his
work."
Erickson noted, however, that
Khrushchev's tactlessness, his
strategic planning in 1964 and the
background of the Cuban failure
all combined to make military
leaders apprehensive that Russia
might find herself trapped by her
unbalanced military machine.
Khrushchev's fall has not set-
tled the debate over military
strategy, Erickson said, but the
military leaders have once again
receded from the forefront of the
political scene: The fall of
Khrushchev did not mark the
sudden emergence of military
dominance.
"Soviet military officials arej
still preoccupied with purely mili-
tary matters," he pointed out.
'"However, the increased import-
ance of technology has enhanced
their power, and the younger gen-
eration in the military command
is more politically oriented than
the old guard."

Council on OAS Role
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (U)-Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson
chided the UN Security Council yesterday for what he said was a
childish effort to downgrade the role of the Organization of American
States in the Dominican crisis.
In a biting speech to the council the United States chief delegate
said such action "seems to me to be positively embarrassing," and
could be compared with that of a 'petulant actress, jealous of her
supporting cast."
Stevenson drew immediate fire from Soviet Ambassador Nikolai T.
Fedorenko, who said Stevenson was playing the role of "a second rate
actor." As for defense of the OAS, Fedorenko said this reminded him
of a statement by former New
York Gov. Alfred E. Smith that
"however thinly you slice the ba-
loney, baloney remains baloney."
Opposed Suggestion
Stevenson was opposing a sug- R undu
gestion from French delegate Rog-
er Seydoux and supported by the --
Soviet Union and Jordan for en- By The Associated Press
largement of the five-man UN
mission in Santo Domingo headed TOKYO-An estimated 24,000
by Jose Antonio Mayobre. He is demonstrators held a massive ral-
the special representative of Sec- ly yesterday protesting what they
retary-General U Thant. claim is United States aggression
Thant said he would give the in Viet Nam.
suggestion careful consideration There were some minor scufflesr
and make a statement at the next between police and students, re-
meeting of the council on Friday. sulting in six students being de-
Stevenson - defended vigorously tained by police.
the role of regional organizations
such as the OAS. He said their PARIS - The newspaper Le
mission "is not competitive withE Monde predicted yesterday the
the United Nations, but comple- Johnson administration will have
mentary to it. Their roles are not trouble getting support in the
mutually exclusive but mutually United States as well as abroad
reinforcing." for its decision to give U.S. forces
Aid nd ncouagea more active fighting role in
Aid and Encourage South Viet Nam.
He said the council should beS
aiding and encouraging the OAS In a front page editorial the
"instead of acting or sounding, or newspaper raised the question
even implying that it is jealous, whether Americans are willing to
resentful or suspicious of the send their sons to fight in a dis-
OAS" "tant country.

The Daily 'Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the eay preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on reqgest; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organisation notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, JUNE 10
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-George S.
Odiorne, Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions, "Management by Objectives -
Results-Oriented Appraisal Systems":
Michigan Union, 8 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop-Geary A. Rummier,
director, "Use, Evaluation, Selection,
and Writing of Programmed Materials":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Doctoral Examination for Norman
Paul Lasca, Jr., Geology; thesis: "The
Surf icial Geology of Skeldal, Mesters
Vig, Northeast Greenland," Thurs., June
10, 2045 Nat. Sci. Bldg., 9 a.m.
Doctoral Examination for Alan Irwin
Gebben, Botany; thesis: "The Ecology
of Common Ragweed, Ambrosia arte-
misiifolia, L. In Southeastern Michi-
gan," Thurs., June 10, 1139 Nat. Sci
IBldg., 2 p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Dept.Iof Agriculture, Wash., D.C. -
Position in chem. unit of poultry in-
spection lab. BS Chem. Lab. exper.
helpful. Located in Beltsville, Md.
YWCA, Lansing, Mich.-Asst. Pro-
gram Director for health, phys. ed. &
recreation. BA in phys. ed. plus lead-
ership exper. Also Director to plan &
direct program. Degree plus 1 yr. grad
study. 3 yrs. exper.
State of Michigan-Positions for pa-
role or probation officers. BA in Soc.
Psych, or rel. plus 3 yrs. exper. MSW
may substitute 1-2 yrs. case work ex-
per, for part of above exper. Locatec
in Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Pon-
tiac, Jackson & Kalamazoo.
Federal Aviation Agency - Flight
Data Aide. 3 yrs. clerical, admin. or
tech, aid exper. or college work may
be substituted for exper. on equal bas
is. 4-6 mos. trng. before assignment
to Air Router Traffic Control cen-
University Activities Center
SPRING
JAZZ SCENE
Rescheduled for
Sunday, June 13, 5-8 p.m.
West Park Band Shell
F FREE
Less than a mile
from campus between
Huron & Miller Rds.
In case of rain again,
concert will be held
in Union Ballroom

ter. Located in Ill., Minn., Ind., Kan.,
& Mont.
. * * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-i
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Camp Sakakawea, Mich.-Girl Scouts.
Mrs. warner is interviewing TODAY
for unit leaders and nurse to work
July 5 to Aug. 21.
Employer's Overload, Detroit-Inter-
view Tues., June 15. Men & women for
jobs in Detroit area after June 26.
Details available at Summer Place-
ment, 212 SAB.

,, * *
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance
instruction, Fri., June 1i, 8-11
women's Athletic Bldg.

with
p.m.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech)
OPENS TOMORROW
TRIPLE THREAT
an evening'of one-act ploys
Coctea u's
ANTIGONE

0

O'Cosey's
BEDTIME STORY

lonesCo'S
BALD SOPRANO

He charged the council with
making specific efforts to delete
from resolutions any mention of
the OAS "as though it were a
threat to prestige of the UN to
even recognize the existence of
the OAS."
"Isn't this a little childish?"
he asked. "Surely this great world
organization is not threatened by
a regional organization, in this
case the OAS . . . and surely this
organization is not so insecure
and so sensitive that it dare not
even recognize its own subordinate
organization."
Stevenson added that "such
behavior by 11 grown men repre-
senting the world seems to me to
be positively embarrassing . . .
Such tactics as we have witnessed
here will not contribute to ad-
vancing the cause of peace, or to
solving the problems immediate-
ly facing the Dominican people."

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and re;gistered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Christian Science Organization, Regu-
lar testimony meeting. Thurs., 7:30 p.m..
Room 3545, SAB.

.. . .......

NOTICES

* * *
MUNICH, Germany-The Yu-
goslav consul at Munich was shot
by two gunmen while sitting in
his car last night at Meersburg
on Lake Constance, police report-
ed yesterday.
The consul, Andrija Klaric, was
reported in critical condition.
The Yugoslav consulate gen-
eral in Munich believes the at-
tackers were Yugoslav exiles, a
spokesman said.
* *
RABAT, Morocco-King Hassan
II named a cabinet of 23 minis-
ters yesterday as his first official
act since taking over all execu-
tive and legislative powers.
The sovereign announced Tues-
day that he was assuming all pow-
ers after talks with the country's
political, labor and parliamentary
leaders failed to produce a coali-
tion cabinet.

8 p.m. - LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Fri.-Sat. All Seats: 50c
Box Office Open 12:30-5 (Until 8 p.m. performance nights)
*1 1
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THIS WEEKEND
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the musical comedy classic
i YANKE E DOOD LE DAN DY"
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Special times - Friday and
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:10 p.m.
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IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIy
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ofiTsFI- .
ALSO CARTOON & NEWS

ENDING TONIGHT
SHOWS AT
1:00-3:35-6:15-8:50

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THEY SAID IT COULD
NOT BE FILMED!

DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
We lease cars
$4.50 per 24 hr. day
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART

MIRIAM HOPKINS WALTER GILLER-ALEX DARCY
LETITIA ROMAN as Fanny
Written by ROBERT HILL A FAMOUS PLAYERS CORPORATION PRODUCTION

ADULTS
PLEASE

319 W. Huron

665-3688

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STARTING FRIDAY
Gregory Peck in "MIRAGE"
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SA LE
COOL SUMMER SHIRTWAIST ESE
990
Collect a sun-weather wardrobe of these print and stripe roll sleeve,

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