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May 05, 1965 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-05

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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,r.GEaEIG-. THE Vaah1VA11 LTaITV . --.

IV LONESDAX, 3UY 5, 1965

HISTORY, PHYSICS:
Regents Appoint New Department Chairmen

LI

(Continued from Page 2)
professor of engineering English,
effective with the 1965-66 Univer-
sity year. He is an instructor in
the literary college.
Languages
Raleigh Morgan Jr. as professor
of Romance languages and lin-
guistics, effective September. .He
is head of the Romance language
department at Howard Unnversity.
Raymon J. Nelson as visiting
professor of communication
sciences and philosophy, effective
January 1966. He is on the fac-
ulty of the Case Institute of Tech-
nology.
John G. Pedley as assistant pro-
fessor of classical archeology, ef-
fective this September. He is to
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitl of Michigan,, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are .not
accepted for pubilication.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 5
Day Calendar
Dept. of Postgraduate Medicine Il-
lustrated Lecture-Paul Gikas, M.D.,
"An Analysis of Fatal Automobile Ac-
sidents": M5330 Medical Science Bldg.
4:15 p.m.
Doctoral Examination-for John Tracy
Luke, Near Eastern Languages & Lit-
eratures; thesis: "Pastoralism. and Poli-
tics in the Mari Period," today,. 2033
Angell Hall, 2 p.m., Chairman, G. E.
Mendenhall.
General Notices
Student Organizations:' Registration
of recognized student organizations
planning to be active during the
Spring/Summer Term must be com-
pleted' by May 26, 1965. Forms are
available in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, 1011 Student Activities Bldg. Priv-
ileges such as the use of the Organi-
zation Announcement column in The
Michigan Daily, use of meeting rooms
in University buildings, assignment of
Student Activities Bldg. facilities, etc.
are available to registered organizations
only.-
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Ann Arbor Employers-1. Chemists,
men any degree level, exper. not req.
2. Secretary, good shorthand, Chem.
bkgd. 3. Secretary, asst. to res. direc-
tor, Chem..major, male or female.
State of Michigan-1. Speech Thera-
pist Trainee, MA speech, bkgd. in path.
ology & audiology. Located in Plymouth
and Lapeer State Homes. 'Deadline May
17. 2. Student Librarian, BA & ac-
ceptance in Lib. Sci. grad school. Lo-
cated ,in" Lansing. Deadline May 10. 3.
Boys Supv, for Boys Trng. School at
Lansing & Whitmore Lake. 2 yrs. col-
lege; 2 yrs. exper. in youth organiza-
tion; or 1 yr. exper. in supv. of de-
linquent boys.I
Local Organization-Registered Nurse,
Med. Tech., or qualified person to
travel within Mich. with research unit.
Draw blood and assist in research on
mental retardation. Woman for immed.
opening,
Welch Grape Juice Co., Inc., West-
field, N.Y.-Systems Analyst, BS or MS
in Math or mgmt. sciences. 3-5 yrs.
systems exper. Knowl. of automation
techniques req.
West Suburban Hospital, Oak Park,
III.-Young man, major in Biot or
Zool. to assist in research projects. 'In-
terest in photography helpful.
Oakland County Planning Comm.,
Pontiac, Mich.-Young woman to orga-
nize reference library. Basic lib. courses
plus some exper. Typing necessary.
Wolverine Fabricating & Mfg. Co.,
Inkster, Mich. - Chemist, degree in
-Chem. or Ch. Engrg. Some exper. in
rubber compounding ingredients & syn-
thetic elastomers pref. 1-2 yrs. lab.
pref.
U.S. Public Health Service, Dearborn,
Mich.-Man or woman, MA psych., edu-
cation or rel. to administer tests to
children in mobile health center. Tra-
vel over the U.S. Summer or one year
duration. Apply immediately.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

receive his PhD at Harvard Uni-
versity this spring.
Richard L. Phillips as assistant
professor of aeronautical and as-
tronautical engineering, effective
in September. He now is serving a
National Science Foundation post-
doctoral fellowship in Germany.
History
Donald J. Proctor as assistant
professor of history, Dearborn
Campus, effective in September.
He is at California State College,
Los Angeles.
Donald W. Tinkle as curator of
reptiles and amphibians in the
Museum of Zoology and professor
of zoology, effective July 1. He
now is on the faculty of Texas
Technological College.
John M. Malville, assistant pro-
fessor of astronomy, resigned ef-
fective June 30 to accept a posi-
tion on the staff of the High Al-
titude Observatory operated by
the University Corporation for At-
mospheric Research, Boulder, Col-
orado.
Retirement
Elinor M. Husselman, curator in
the Kelsey Museum of Archaeol-
ogy, has asked for retirement ef-
fective July 1. She has been on
the staff at the museum since
1952 and has carried on research
in papyrology and Coptic studies
and has published extensively. She
also has served as editor of the
Kelsey Museum publications.
A memoir on the death March
26 of Wilfred M. Senseman, pro-
fessor of English at The Univer-
sity of Michigan, was also adopted
by the Regents.
Assignments
The Regents also 'approved the
following off-campus assignments
and leaves of absence:
Miss Adelia M. Beeuwkes, pro-
fessor of public health nutrition,
June 29 to July 26. She has been
invited to present a paper at the
Fourth International Congress of
Dietetics, Stockholm, and will
visit food and agriculture organ-
izations in several other countries.
John B. Burch, associate pro-
fessor of zoology and curator of
mollusks in the Museum of Zool-
ogy, March 19 to July 15. He has
received grants from the Rocke-
feller Foundation and the Na-
tional Science Foundation to make
a study of certain schistosomiasis-
transmitting mollusks of East
Africa.
Fellowship
Mrs. Ruth G. Cumings, associate
professor of public health nursing
and mental health, June 14 to
July 18. She has been nominated
for a World Health Organization
Traveling Fellowship which will
permit her to visit the United
Kingdom and Europe to study
nursing activities.
Marvin Eisenberg, professor and
chairman, department of the his-
tory of art, April 26 to May 23.
He is to assist in the acquisitions1
program of the Museum of Art.
Frederick H. Epstein, professor
of epidemiology, April 9 to June 9.1
He will attend meetings and visit
laboratories in England and Eur-
ope concerned with studies of
heart disease, liver metabolismj
and arteriosclerosis.
Preventive Medicine 1
Vlado A. Getting, professor, and,
chairman, department of com-
munity health services, June 1-30.
As national consultant in pre-
ORGANIZATION'
NOTICES

ventive medicine to the surgeon
general' of the U.S. Air Force, he
has been requested to visit Air
Force commands in the European
theater. Travel expenses are being
met by the Air Force.
Robert R. Miller, professor of
zoology and curator of fishes in
the Museum of Zoology, March 19
to April 30. He has a National
Science Foundation grant for field
work in Mexico.
R. L. Shaffer, curator of fungi
and lichens in the Herbarium and
associate professor of botany,
June 1 to Nov. 1. He has a Na-
tional Science Foundation grant
for European study.
William P. Alston, professor of
philosophy, July 1 to June 30,
1966. He will serve as a fellow of
the Center for Advanced Study in
the Behavorial Sciences, Stan-
ford, Calif.
Guggenheim Grant
Manuela Cirre, assistant pro-
fessor of Spanish, fall term. While
in Spain where her husband will
be on a Guggenheim grant,, she
will pursue studies in Spanish-
Arabic literature.
William D. Drake, associate re-
search engineer, Institute of
Science and Technology, March 1
to Dec. 31. He has been asked to
serve as a staff member of the
National Commission of Technol-
ogy, Automation and Economic
Progress recently established by
the U.S. government.
Johan W. Eliot, assistant pro-
fessor of maternal and child
health, April 19 to July 11. He has
been asked to serve as a consul-
tant to the American Friends
Service Committee in Algeria.
Frank Grace, professor of politi-
cal science, sabbatical leave for
the 1965-66 winter term. He is to
revise Francis G. Wilson's "Ameri-
can Political Mind."
Fulbright Grant
George Grassmuck, professor of
political science, sabbatical leave
for the 1965-66 University year.
With the assistance of a Fulbright
grant he will spend the time in
the Near East attempting to de-
termine the extent of change in
public administration evident in
recently modernized nations.
Paul. R. Halmos, professor of
mathematics, 1965-66 fall and
winter terms. He will be on a visit-
ing appointment at the University
of Miami.
Amos Hawley, professor of so-
ciology, Aug. 30 to Dec. 30. This
is an extension of leave to permit
him to observe and measure demo-
grapihic change after a full year's
operation of an experimental proj-
ect in family planning in Southern
Asia..
L. Richard Hoffman, associate
professor of psychology, fall and
winter terms, 1965-66. He is to
serve as a visiting associate pro-
fessor at the University of Cali-
fornia, Berkeley.
Anthony T. Kruzas, associate
professor of library science, fall
term, 1965, He is to complete work
on a second edition of his "Direc-
tory of Special Libraries and In-
formation Centers."
Communist Ideology
Donald J. Munro, assistant pro-
fessor of philosophy, University
year 1965-66. Under a grant from
the Social Science Research Coun-
cil he will carry out a research
project on Chinese Communist
ideology in Hong Kong and Japan.
Warren T. Norman, associate
professor of psychology, University
year 1965-66. Sabbatical leave for
research and study in his field. He
has applied for a USPHS research

grant to help support the inves-
tigations.
Charles R. ODonnell, associate
professor of English, fall and win-
ter terms, 1965-66. He will be a
visiting professor at Hofstra Uni-
versity.
Frederick K. Sparrow, professor
of botany, winter term, 1966. He is
to serve as a visiting professor at
the University of California at
Berkeley.
Research
Leland Stowe, professor of
journalism, fall term 1965. He will
carry out research in Western
Europe and Yugoslavia for various
articles.
Mark E. Suino, assistant pro-
fessor of Slavic languages and
literatures, fall and winter terms
1965-66. He will be teaching in
Czechoslavakia under an exchange
agreement between the' United
States and Czechoslovakia.
Ronald L. Teigen, assistant pro-
fessor of economics, academic
year, 1965-66. He has received a
Ford Foundation Faculty Research
Fellowship to continue research
on monetary changes.
Gifts and Grants
At the meeting the Regents also
accepted over $416,000 in gifts to
the University.
Included in the gifts was more
than $102,800 from numerous don-
ors for the Michigan Alumni Fund,
$75,500 from foundations, $114,500
in bequests, $50,800 from business
concerns and more than $72,000
from associations, organizations
and others.
The Carnegie Corporation in
New York gave $40,000 for their
Political Modernization of Japan
Fund, while the Carnegie Founda-
tion for the Adyancement of
Teaching gave $10,057 for the
Carneigie Foundation fund.
Some $36,000 came from the
Aimee Tucker McCullah estate,
San Bernardino, for the Stephen
SUMMER THEATRE
WORKSHOP
Graduate & Undegraduate
College Credit Program
3 to 6 Term Hour Credits.
CO-SPONSORED BY
Mich. State University
and
Circle in the Park
Summer Theatre-Grand Rapids

Davis Tucker Memorial Fund. The ' several years ago by contributions
Mitchell Foundation of Owosso from friends of Frederick W. De-
gave $10,000 for the Mitchell Fund Foe, a 1902 Law School graduate.
for research in peripheral facial V DT.

nerve studies.
$51,000
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund W. Kun-
stadter, Chicago, also gave $51,000
for the University's $55 million
fund.
In additional action, the Re-
gents adopted a resolution accept-
ing a $10,000 bequest from the
will of Mennie C. Frost, former
resident of Chicago, and an 1893
graduate. They also noted the will
of Elizabeth W. DeFoe, recently
offered for probate in New York
County, New York, which leaves
$10,000to the University for the
Frederick W. DeFoe Memorial
Fund. The fund was established

1ew rrogram
A bachelor of science degree
program in applied mathematics
was approved for the engineering
college by the Regents.
Starting date for the program
will be the 1965-66 academic year.
The applied mathematics pro-
gram will provide the student
with an opportunity toextend his
knowledge of the common lan-
guage of the mathematician and
the engineer or scientist, and to
become proficient in the combina-
tion of mathematical and physical
reasoningdneeded for the formu-'
lation and solution of technical
problems.

I

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Full Time & Evening Employment
18-35
if you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. four evenings each week end
occasionally on Saturday, you can maintain your studies and still enjoy
a part-time job doing special interview work that will bring an average
weekly income of $67.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 from 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. Monday-Friday. No other times.
We are also interested in full-time employment.

TWO-COUNT EM-TWO
2
STORES TO SERVE YOU
* STEREO & H I FI COMPONENTS
AND ACCESSORIES
* PORTABLE PHONOGRAPHS &
. RADIOS
' TELEVISION
* RECORDS & TAPES
e music center, inc.
304 SOUTH THAYER

THE INTER-UNIVERSITY
COMMITTEE FOR A PUBLIC
HEARING ON Viet Nam
(desperately needs student help
305 S. State St.
NOrmandy 3-4241

?.4
4

i

ANN ARBOR'S NEWEST BOOKSTORE

Paperbacks at Discount
Literary Magazines
French & German Books
CENTICORE BOOKSHOP
1321 Soith Uiversity between
Forest & Washtenaw
Noon to Midnight Every Day
Before you buy, lease or
pay another month's rent
on an electrostatic copier
Come see the world's first fully automatic copying
machine. Produces dry copies of anything for
as little as $.03 each.
DENNISON COPIER
Michigan Uhion May 1 1 & 12

Sta rt the
Semester Off
.with a

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RED HOT
PIZZA,

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Free Fast Delivery

*4

Accredited Apprenticesh p
Training June 14-Sept. 3

663-5902
663-3379
512 East William

Address Request for Detailed
Brochure and Application to:
Mrs. Norma Brink, President
Circle in the Park
Summer- Theatre
1350.Pinecrest, S.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich. 49506
12 WEEK SUMMER SESSION
CONDUCTED AT
"MICHIGAN'S FIRST
ARENA SUMMER THEATRE

u_ _ __

L'-

Room 3Y

10 A.M.-7 P.M.

mill
mm

0ia

'"

RENT A CAR FROM
ECON-O-CAB
We Rent to Students 19 years and older
Free Pick-up and Delivery
CALL 663-2033 FOR RESERVATIONS

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Meet-
ing, Wed., May 5, 7:30 p.m., Room 3-D,
Michigan'Union.

Add excitement to your living-
Make your surroundings more interesting
with all handcrafted articles
such as woven bedspreads-embroidered
numbah rugs; carved screens;
and painted scrolls.
00
INDIA ARDT SHOP
330 Maynard (Across from Arcade)
x==> 0-=>*=>0<=>0=">0--">0<""""0"=--><'""">0=" r

Far LeEi
Makes the.
Scene
From Berkeley to Brooklyn,
swarms of students are joining
in. the noise and fire of new
radical groups. The current is-
sue of The Saturday Evening
Post has the inside story of the
greatest rise of the Far Left
since the 1930's.
Read how some groups are
almost peaceful; others are so
militant that even the Ameri-
can Communist Party disowns
them. How young leaders of
the "existential radicalism" see
the Cuban Revolution as a blue-
print for America, Find out
about new plans for protest and

U.

r

s
A
T

HEADQUARTERS for
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
OFFICE FURNITURE, TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS
SMITH-CORONA & OLYMPIA
TYPEWRITERS
Portable
LL MAKES, bought, sold,
rented
ERMS: We try to suit customer.
FOUNTAIN PENS all makes
ALER for A. B. Dick Mimeographs
and uppiesSales £ Se rv ice. (24 H rs.)
by Factory-trained men.
STUDENT SUPPLIES CHAIRS
Stationery
Study kamps
Note Books F K

DE

Everybody Welcome

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MICHIGAN CHRISTIAN

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