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December 09, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-09

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9, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAM C5JJAVI y E

9,16 ~E CIGA DIL

rAktE 6EVEIN

Thailand Fights To Maintain Freedom
With American Military, Civic Assistance

He Picks, Sorts and Sends

WI

BEAUTIFUL EARRINGS

William L. Ryan
AP Special Corespondent
Thailand, a nation which has
been independent longer than the
United States, has a huge stake
in the Viet Nam war, whatever
its outcome.
Today there is considerable
worry that Thailand will become
another arena of internationalized
conflict and another explosion
point in Southeast Asia.
Many in the nation of 30 million
feel that if Viet Nam is settled
on any terms which might spell
eventual success for communism,
political or otherwise, Thailand
will be in grave danger.
On the other hand, these Thais
say, if the Communist are clearly
balked in Viet Nam, an incipient,
Communist-sparked "people's war"
in Thailand will collapse.
Weakspot
Thailand is now in the midst
of a bustling economic boom-but
there is a major weakspot. It is
the northeast, home for a third of
the population. It is impoverished.
disease-ridden, plagued by bad
soil and by too much or too little
water-floods or lack of potable
water. Its racial ties are more to
the Lao people than to the Thais.
For many years it has had no di-
rect connection with the capital
and the central regime. Most
northeast people, until this year,
never saw a government official or
policeman. It has little direct con-
nection or identificatioh wth the
Thai nation as a whole.
To Americans on the scene, the
question is not whether Thailand
is a representative democracy. It
is not. It is a monarchy which, in
fact, is 'a sort of benevolent dic-
tatorship domininated by the mili-
tary. Dictatorship, Asian style, is
nothing new in Asia, whose people
would have a long way to go to
achieve Western-type democracy,
even if they wanted it.
But Thailand remains a proudly
independent nation which once
fought off the Chinese and which
has successfully resisted European
and other colonialisms over the
centuries. The question is whether
Thailand must submit to domin-
ination by a huge neighbor and

forcible imposition of that neigh-i
bor's own form of dictatorship. 1
Nation-building1
To avert this, Thailand is en-
gaged in an intensive program its!
leaders c a 11 "nation-building."
With the help of the United Statesl
it is trying to create an identifica-
tion between the northeast and
the rest of the country. It is try-
ing to avert what happened in Viet
Nam-in effect, buying time and;
trying to use that time to the best
advantage. Time may be short.
The American investment in the
economic effort at the current rate
is a good deal less per year than
what is spent now in Viet Nam in
one day. Since 1949, total U.S. in-
vestment in the Thai economic ef-
forth has been about $500 million.-
This is apart from the military'
side, a matter of U.S. interests. At
present there are 25,000 or more
U.S. troops in Thailand and a
complex of bases built by the
Americans and turned over to the
Thais. U.S. planes now use these
bases against the Viet Nam Com-
munists. The bases also bolster
Thailand against its own Com-
munist threat.
'People's War'
The threat seems small at the
moment, but it is real. A "people's
war" already has started-as Red
China long ago promised it would.
In all, intelligence sources say,
there are about 1,500 guerrillas
active in the northeast provinces
close to the border of that part of
Laos now held by the Communist"
Pathet Lao.
Infiltration is an easy matter
for the Communists. Ethnically,
the northeast people are close to
the Laos. The jungled areas and
the Mekong River provide cover
for the passage of men, arms and
ammunition.
The guerrillas operate in bands
of 40 or 50 in a pattern omin-
Viet Nam when that war was be-
ously similar to the insurgents in
ginning. Americans and others in
the field say that recently there
has been an increase in the num-
bers and organization of the guer-
rillas, that the incidents are less
sporadic and isolated. They note
that infiltration has been heavier

in recent months, particularly in The United States is helping
the area of Nakhon Phanom on with a counter-insurgency pro-
the Pathet Lao border. The Red gram aimed first at establishing

intention may be to set up
area as a "liberated" nucleus
a base of operations in the
Nam Cummunist style.
Police Sweeps

that
and
Viet

The Thai government is re-
sponding with broader and more
determined police sweeps in the
area, which now account for a
rising incidence of armed clashes.
But there are obstacles to pacifica-
tion, not the least of which is the
fear of the villagers to report the
guerrillas. Like those in Viet Nam,
the guerrillas make a practice of
assassinating those village leaders,
teachers, officals and others who
collaborate with the government.
The rate in 1966 has been about
10 assassinations every month.

security in the northeast, extend-
ing police services to the villages
and stepping up police mobility
and techniques of law enforce-
ment. This program is coupled
with an economic civic action-or
"nation-building" - approach in-
volving establishment of schools,
hospitals, enterprises and the like
to make the villages more self-
sufficient.
The program has a long way to
go, but its impact, both through
the U.S. program of road building
and o t h e r construction and
through the work of the so-called
Mobile Development Units in the
northeast villages, is being felt.
In this respect, the Thais are far
ahead of the South Vietnamese.

(Continued from page 1)
skip classes" as deputy sheriff of
Steuben County under his father.
("Dad hired me because he could
pay me less than anyone else-low
county budget.")
The younger Hershey was fre-
quently called from the classroom
to make an arrest or to deliver a
malefactor from jail to the state
prison. He often used his power
to settle family squabbles without
resorting to his power to arrest.
Still Hershey found time to play
basketball for Tri-State.
"I played back guard and my
job was to throw a hip into the
first opposition man coming down
the floor and hope that my team-
mates knocked all the other play-
ers onto the floor. Of course they
didn't call fouls quite as carefully
then as they do today."
After teaching school for several
years Hershey became a full time
soldier in 1916. While he has been
with the military since 1916 he
has never seen combat action.
In 1923 he was named assistant
professor of military science and
tactics at Ohio State University.
"I remember old Harlan Hatcher
was teaching English at the school
while I was there." Hershey went

on to a variety of military instruc-
tion roles before joining the Se-
lective Service System.
The General is currently in
more than a dozen service groups
but his primary interest is the
Boy Scouts. He's been president
of the National Capital Area Boy
Scout Council since 1961. He's been
honored with two of scouting's
highest awards, the Silver Beaver
and the Silver Antelope. Hershey
has a host of other awards such
as the "Minute Man of 1964" ci-
tation from the Reserve Officers
Association of the U.S.
At 73 the General still gets
around alot by "mowing the lawn
and raking the leaves out at the
house in Bethesda."
Retirement?
As things stand now Hershey
says he will stay on the job "until
my health gives out or they fire
me. My health's o.k. So I guess
they'll have to fire me."
Despite the significance of his
job Hershey prefers to discount
his importance. Munching a take
out White Tower lunch of cheese-
burger and tea, the General con-
tends his office merely supplies
the Pentagon's manpower needs.
"All we do is pick 'em, sort 'em,
and send 'em."

TO MATCH

YOUR PIN

Says Saigon Will Not Tolerate!
More U.S. Arrests of Civilians

SAIGON (P) - Vietnamese
authorities said yesterday they will
not tolerate any more arrests of
Vietnamese civilians by U.S. Mili-
tary Police following the seizure
of the mayor of Saigon.
A statement to that effect was
made by the head of the Vietnam-
ese police as an aftermath of the
handcuffing and temporary arrest
early yesterday of Mayor Van Van
tua, a paratroop colonel.
Brig. Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan,
director general of the police who

is also the mayor's brother-in-law,
told newsmen: "Only Vietnamese
police can arrest Vietnamese civil-
ians and check papers of the Viet-
namese military. The Vietnamese
police can also interrogate or ar-
rest U.S. civilians. The U.S. Mili-
tary Police can only question and
arrest U.S. military men.
"For myself, I'll use strict meas-
ures concerning the sovereignty
of Viet Nam. I'll remind the Amer-
ican Military Police of its juris-
diction."

[ . I

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WORSHIP

DARLINGTON LUTHERAN
Wisconsin Synod
3545 Packard Rd.

CHURCH

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Services at 10:30 a.m. For transportation call
Rev. Robert Boer, 761-1418 or Tim Krier-
wall, 665-5952.
Look into Lutheran Collegians.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard{
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:15 a.m.-Holy Communion.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General. Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
11:00 a.m. - Sermon: "When God Starts
Something He Will Finish It."
7:00 p.m.-Special Sunday School Christmas
program: "The Question."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council'
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11 :00 a.m.-Worship Services.
7:00 to 10:00 p.m.-Christmas open house.
WEDNESDAY
10:00 p.m.-Vespers.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Kloudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover6Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "Learn God's Love."
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m. - Young Marrieds-Pine Room,
dinner and caroling party.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 a.m.-Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta supper.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenow
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship Service. Ser-
mon, "Are You the Christ?"
1 1:00 a.m.--Coffee Hour.
7:00 p.m. - Candle Light Christmas Carol
Service.
8:00 p.m.--Christmas Coffee.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services of Music at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-
Respighi, "Laud to the Nativity."
Church School at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.
Guild House, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9-. n m - etr.. rhnnlHnti

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor

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