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December 09, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-09

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1966

THE, MICHIGAN DAILY

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IeRIDAY, DECEMBER 9,1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY DL tlW ~wiDww

rain "in6 A AcE 8

Gain Agreement on

r at Pope Asks Extension of Truce.
Into Armistice for Peace Talks

'To

Ban

Weapons

in

Space

AUSTIN, Tex. WP) - President
Johnson disclosed yesterday that
the United States, the Soviet Un-
ion and 26 other nations have
agreed on a treaty to ban war
and weapons from the reaches of
space.
Johnson saluted the terms of a
draft treaty worked out by the
UN Committee on Outer Space as
"this important step toward
peace." He said it translates into
treaty form no-bombs-in-orbit
resolution of the United Nations.
"It guarantees," he said, "free
access to all areas and installa-
tions of celestial bodies. This.
openness, taken with other pro-
visions of the treaty, should pre-

vent warlike preparations on the j one of the first countries to rati- [words in length. The pact is to be!

moon and other celestial bodies."
To become effective, the treaty
must gain approval of the UN
General Assembly and then the
ratification of individual nations
-by the Senate, in the case of the
United States.
In a statement read to reporters
by presidential assistant George
Christian at the White House
press center in Austin, Johnson
said he expects early action by
the assembly. He said he plans
to submit the treaty to the Sen-
ate at the congressional session
starting next month.
The President voiced a hope
that the United States will be

i __ _ ., _... ,... ..,.. , .. ..... ., a .. ., r .. v ... w .,.

fy this multination effort to quar-
antine outer space against war.
"It is the most important arms
control development since the
limited test-ban treaty of 1963,"
Johnson said.
That treaty, which most nations
have ratified, bars nuclear testing
in the atmosphere but not under-
ground. France and Red China,
the two most recent members of
the nuclear weapons society, have
not ratified.
The treaty, including its pream-
ble, is about 2,000 words long. The
actual test as distinguished from
the prefatory statement of aims
and principles, is about 1,700

of unlimited duration, although
any nations in it may withdraw
upon one year's written notice.
The text was not made public,
but it was learned the treaty
avoids a definition of outer space
and this is one of the problems
which the drafting committee
agreed should be left over for fur-
ther work in the United Nations.
The key provision in the pact,
Article IV, is the following:
"States party to the treaty un-
der take not to place in orbit
around the earth any object
carrying nuclear weapons or any
other kinds of weapons of mass
destruction, install suchweapons
on celestial bodies or station such
weapons in outer space in any
other manner.
"The moon and other celestial
bodies shall be used by all states
party to the treaty exclusively
for peaceful purposes. The estab-
lishment of military bases, instal-
lations and fortifications, the
testing of any type of weapons
and the conduct of military man-
euvers on celestial bodies shall be
forbidden. The use of military per-
sonnel for scientific research or
for any other peaceful purposes
shall not be prohibited. The use

of any equipment or facility ne-
cessary for peaceful exploration
of the moon and other celestial
bodies shall also not be prohib-
ited.,
The White House was silent on
whether the fact that this country
and the Soviet Union could come
to terms on peacekeeping efforts
for space might offer hopes fof
cooperation in ending the war on
this planet in Viet Nam.
But Christian promised sympa-
thetic consideration by the U S.
government for the appeal of Pope
Paul VI for a full-scale armistice
to permit peace talks.
"The U.S.. government," Chris-
tian said, reading from a state-
ment, "fully shares the desire of
His Holiness, the Pope, for a
peaceful solution in Viet Nam.
His suggestions have always re-
ceived sympathetic considera-
tion on our part, as will his most
recent proposals."
The President, Christian an-
nounced, will be flying back to
Washington to wade into details
of the new budget to be submit-
ted to Congress next month. He
said Johnson would remain sever-
al days, then return to the LBJ
Ranch near Johnson City, Tex.,,
for the holidays.

By The Associated Press
VATICAN CITY-Pope Paul VI
appealed yesterday for the Viet
Nam Christmas truce to be ex-
tended into a lasting armistice for
the negotiation of an honorable
peace. In one of his most opti-
mistic statements on the war, he
said the prospect for an end of
fighting is brighter.
His appeal brought no imme-
diate response from either side in
the conflict. Hanoi has never re-
plied to any of the papal pleas. In
Saigon, South Vietnamese Premier

Nguyen Cao Ky said recently any
truce should be a matter of hours,
not days. U.S. officials contend
the Communists take advantage of
prolonged truce to regroup and
resupply.
The proposal received a promise
of sympathetic U.S. consideration
from President Johnson yesterday.
But U.S. officials see grave
dangers, as well as the possibility
of advancing peace hopes, in the
proposal.
The greatest danger seen by
Johnson administration policy-

'Viet Combat Death Rate
'Lower Than Past Wars

makers is that the proposal, which
the Pope directed toward both
sides, could be converted by foes of
this country's Vietnamese policy
into a weapon to press for a new
one-sided bombing- pause.
So far, Johnson and Secretary
of State Dean Rusk have ruled
out any bombing pause like that
which grew out of the Christmas
truce last year and ran for 37
days-and failed to bring any re-
ciprocal gesture from Hanoi to-
ward scaling down the war or
negotiating.
Some of the best-informed
Washington authorities agree with
Pope Paul's assessment that the
prospects for peace in Viet Nam
now are brighter than they were
earlier this year. But the reason
for Washington's cautious opti-
mism may be very different from
the Pope's reasons.
The view here is that the Com-
munist forces are taking such
severe losses from. the air and
ground fighting in the south and
from the bombing of the north-
that they will be compelled in the
next few months to reassess their
position. They could choose peace,
or they could ask for "volunteers"
from Red China and other Com-
munist countries, an act which
would lead to expanding te war
and bring on a great world crisis.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The ratio of
American combatt deaths to non-
fatal wounds in Viet Nam is run-
ning much lower proportionately
than during World War II and

Iraq To Station Troops in Syria
STo Join 'Battle Against Israel'

'3
'I

By The Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon-Iraq tight-
ened the tension in the Middle
East another notch yesterday
v with reports that it was preparing
to send troops into Syria to face
the Israeli army.
Baghdad radio said an Iraqi
military delegation would visit
Syria to confer on positions where
the Iraqui troops could be station-
ed along the Syrian-Israeli fron-
tier.
Earlier, Iraq's chief of staff said
Iraqi forces had been moved to
the border of Iraq and Syria,

awaiting orders from the Arab
unified command to join "the
battle against Israel."
Baghdad has made several sim-
ilar gestures in past years but
there have never been confirmed
reports of Iraqi troops actually
entering Syria.
Reports from Cairo said the
chief of the Arab unified com-
United Arab Republic, told a meet-
mand, Lt. Gen. Aly Amer of the
ing of the Arab League Defense
Council that Iraqi troops were
necessary to bolster Jordan's de-
fense against Israel. Jordan in

R o mney Hits Johnson's
Lack of Understanding

By The Associated Press
New York - Michigan's Gov.
George W. Romney said yesterday
he hadn't made up his mind about
running for the presidency yet,
but hit out at President Johnson
and the "Great Society" as though
he were already on the 1968 cam-
paign trail.
He said at a news conference
that as a result of the President's
failure to put through a tax in-
crease last year, "the economy is
now teetering on the brink of a
slowdown."
The reason Johnson didn't "ex-
ercise the courage" to take this
and other tough but needed steps,
Romney asserted, was "because of
political expediency and a lack of
understanding."
He also accused Johnson of cre-
ating a "confidence gap" by not
giving the American people full
information about the war in Viet
Nam.
, "When you can't have confi-
dence in what those who have a
public trust are saying," he de-
clared, "you are really in a tough
spot."

"If President Johnson had been
running in 1966, he's have been
licked," the Republican governor
said.
He spoke on the eve of the Re-
publican governors' convention in
Colorado Springs, Colo., where an
Associated Press survey showed
few state chief executives ready to
hop on a Romney bandwagon.
Several said they want aspirants
for a place on the next national
ticket to display their political
wares more fully. Some said they
are looking for a winner without
too much reference to political
philosophy.
Romney wil be among Friday
arrivals for sessions et which the
governors will discuss the results
of this year's election, talk about
1968 prospects.
Romney, who has said he is con-
sidering the race in 1968 but has
made no decision, was among a
bloc of governors who declined to
state any public preference for the
nomination and refused to spec-
ulate on the candidate the party
convention might choose.

the past has rejected proposals to
station other Arab troops on its
territory, and Cairo papers today
criticized Jordan for his stand.
In the past two weeks, however,
Jordan has reportedly moved an
unknown number of soldiers into
the .country from Saudi Arabia,
Jordan's moderate ally in -its feud
with the more revolutionary Arab
states.
Jordan was also assailed by the
Palestine Liberation Organization
for not allowing its units to oper-
ate on its frontier, and by the
Syrian Socialist regime, which is
urging Jordan to permit com-
mando raids into Israel.
Syria's Socialist government had
yesterday seized all properties of
the Western-owned. Iraq Petro-
leum Co. and imposed new high
royalties on oil being. pumped
through pipelines for European
markets.
A communique broadcast by
Damascus radio said the pipeline
and other property of the company,
were under "executive seizure" to
force the company to pay increas-
ed transit royalties for the first
nine months of this year. It es-
timated the back royalties at more
than $9.3 million.
The Syrian chief of state, Nu-
reddien Atassi, offered yesterday
to -arm oposition forces inside Jor-
dan to overthrow King Hussein.
Jordan itself was reported calm,
and schools were scheduled to re-
open following riots and demon-
strations which swept the western
part of the country last month.
In the northern Jordanian town
of Nablus, a 24-hour curfew was
lifted as tension after an attempt-
ed student demonstratioin Monday
seemed to lessen.
The attempted demonstration
and a general strike with it were
to protest the cancellation of a
conference of local leaders in Je-
rusalem to demand stronger meas-
ures against Israel. Other towns
on the River Jordan's west bank
were reported calm.

world News Roundup t
to
By The Associated Press guty of aggression in Viet Nam K
TOKYO-Peng Chen, disgraced which is the ma jor obstacle to in- a
former mayor of Peking, and ternatiornal peace.f
Chiang Nan-hsiang, once minis- The premier, in a television ad-h
ter of higher education, are to be dress on the French national net-
denounced today before the pub- work, renewed that charge against s
lic at a mass rally in Peking, a the United States. He asserted the C
Japanese report from the Chinese ISiviet Union will continue mate- t
capital said. rial aid to Hanoi until this "ag-k
The newspaper Yomiuri's corre- gression" ceases.w
spondent based in Peking said Kosygin said he and President
'Peng and others will be given al- Charles de Gaulle found "manyh
most no chance to speak" at the ,,
rally, called a "struggle rally' sin ofthei Vietnamese sitation, d
against elements of "anti-party, but he stopped short of saying the C
antisocialism and anti-Mao Tse- Soviet and French positions ared
tung's thought." identical. d
The mass rally will be sponsored s
by the militant Red Guards. c
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.-After 4
PIRAEUS, Greece - Loosened 20 years of debate, the United Na-
from its moorings by a pounding tions has completed its work on
Aegean storm, a 16-ton refrigera- a far-reachig treaty aimed at
tor trailer became a monstrous extending basic rights to mankind, i.
battering ram that tore open the It ail be years before the treatyn
Greek car and passenger ferry- can be effective, and U.S. approval
ship Heraklion and sank her in 15 is problematical, but completion
minutes, survivors said last night. of the drafting comes in time for
Officials counted 230 persons the celebration of Human Rights;
missing and presumed drowned. Day, Saturday.
Of the 281 persons aboard, rescue The rights are spelled out in'
ships reported they had picked up two covenants-economic, social
49 survivors. and cultural, and civil and polit-
* *ical.
PARIS - Soviet Premier Alexei The covenants will become ef-I
N. Kosygin told the French people fective when 35 nations have rati-l
last night the United States is fied them.

Korea, Pentagon figures showed
yesterday.
The latest count of battlefield
lead and wounded in the South-
east Asian conflict lists 6,236 men
:illed since Jan. 1, 1961 while
35,538 have been wounded-a ratio
f 1 to 3 with 33,629 men killed,
and 10,284 wounded during three
years of fighting.
Just over 292,000 Americans died
in combat in World War II while
670,800 were wounded-a ratio of
to more than 2.
Hit and Run War
One big reason for the propor-
ionately lower number of killed
o wounded lies in the nature of
he war. Viet Nam, in contrast to
Korea and World War II, is a hit-
and-run type of conflict, with no
fixed fronts and few sustained
battles.
American casualties dropped
harply last week, reflecting one
of the periodic lulls in ground ac-
ion. Forty-four Americans were
killed and 521 wounded during the
week ended last Saturday.
Deaths listed "not a result of
hostile action" rose by 25 to 1,436.
These included fatalities in acci-
dental plane and helicopter crash-
s, disease and other causes.
The count of American combat
[eaths includes 4,362 men killed
ince Jan 1 At the present rate
ombat deaths this year .may top$
,500
Yesterday's Action
As action continued yesterday,
US forces struck at three points
in the Saigon sector today in a
new drive to clear the enemy from

bases that could be used to miount
attacks against the capital.
Troops of the U.S. 1st Infantry
Division reported they killed eight
Viet Cong and captured nine in a
clash 22 miles north of Saigon,
completing the operation without
suffering any casualties them-
selves.
Bad weather again restricted
U.S. bombing in North Viet Nam.
A broadcast dispatch from Ha-
noi, unconfirmed by authorities
in Saigon, said two American jets
had been shot down.

i

,"Whosoever shall do the ili of
my Father in heaven, the same
is my brother, and sister, and
inother."
Matthew 12:50
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

REMEMBER WILL
CONTINUE even after The Daily stops publication
W. C. FIELDS FILMS

I

NORMAN NADEL
REVIEWER FOR N.Y. WORLD JOURNAL TRIBUNE,
PRESIDENT OF B'WAY DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE
will speak on
"The Critic's Role in the Theatre-
the Realities of Theatre Criticism Today"
TODAY at 4:00 P.M.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE (4th Floor)
Public Invited 0 Admission Free
9 Discussion Period Will Follow *
Sponsored by PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM,
DEPT. OF JOURNALISM & DEPT. OF SPEECH

MONDAY, Dec.

12, 7:00 & 9:00

MY LITTLE CHICKADEE (with MAE WEST)

TUESDAY, Dec.

13, 7:00 & 9:00

MILLION DOLLAR LEGS (with JACK OAKIE)

4mmmininmm m=mm=n=mmi=mrnrnin === mmamamminmin.....
I
U
U
aI
i
i r
( dir. Rene Clair-1931)}.
French, subtitles. Musical comedy in the tradi-
tion of Sous s T it e Pa ri a d ." h
ims ever made."--London Tirnes.
rU
SSHORTS:. A PROGRAM OF EARY CARTOONS
IF LIFE-Dec.10 & 11
U
(dir. Ingmar Bergman-1958
# Swedish, subtitles. The lives of three wom n
Stold as each awaits the birth of her first child.
Starring Eva Dahlbeck, Ingrid Thulin,,and Bibi
Anderson.
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS: Bestacrsbs ietr.
SHORT: "SOLDIER MAN"
GOLD DIGGERS OF 1931-1
Dec. 15 & 16 ,r[
I (dir. Busby Berkley-1933)
SAmerican. Starring Dick Powell, Joan Blondell,
SGinger Rogers, Aline McMahon, Need,,Sparks. ,
# The campiest -of camp,."includes "The Forgot- . a
ten Man" sequence. Pre-censorship and urn-cut.
I I
SHORT: "PARALYMPICS"
* I
THE CIRCUS-Dec. 17 & 1
(dir. Charlie Chapin-1928)
American. Charlie joins the circus .by 'mistake
i and ends up a lion tamer, tight -rope- walker, r
and clown. With Myrna Kennedy' itAcademy
SAward to Chaplin "for versatility and genius in .
* wrictn o Suing, directing and producing."
SHORTS: "WRONG AGAIN R Laurel N &
Hardy, "OUR DAREDEVIL CHIEF,"" "SUB-
MARINE PILATE"

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

STILL ONLY 50c

NANCY
WALKER

,SCOTT
McKAY

-

the

GREAT SOCIETY,

I

yes, it's true-all of it,
spread before your very EYES

featuring
Jello !
LBJ!
GREAT!

Happenings!

Protestations!

SOCIETY! Spitzboo!
~#w~ m~ ~-~ ~rnw -~x

;

. .a-w mm - m s - mv-

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