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December 08, 1966 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-08

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8, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FACT NINE

8, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA(~ 1"JTWF

U II AlfA,

op

Streaks

By

Cagers,

9

Bobbling Blue Blow
Big Half-time Bulge

I *By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
Special To The Daily
BOWLING GREEN-The over-
sized conglomerate rural which
decorated the Bowling Green Li-
brary could have been a Michi-
gan artist's portrayal of the sec-
and half of last night's basketball
game in the adjacent Anderson
Field House as the Falcons out-
hustled the Wolverines 90-83.
Bowling Green, gobbling up a
nine point deficit early in the
second half, were no doubt in-
spired by the fanatical fans lin-
ing the Anderson snake pit. At
first glimpse of an orange uni-
form, the fans went berserk,
chanting out their warlike fight
song, complete with B. G. S. U.
grunted between refrains. The
Crisler Wants
New Punt Rule
Michigan Athletic Director H.
0. (Fritz) Crisler hopes to intro-
duce a new punt rule at the Jan-
u1 ary NCAA meeting to "bring back
one of the most exciting plays in
football."
The play is a punt return and
Crisler's 'idea is a rule prohibit-
ing the punter from standing more
than ten yards behind the line of
scrimmage. He feels this will force
the offensive linemen to hold their'
blocks longer and give the defense
a better chance to run back the
kick.

squads were announced in total
blackout, each player illuminated
by a thin blue spotlight.
The exuberance was epitomized
by one crewcut student in a col-
legiate sweater who, after the first
call against the Falcons, leeped
from his front row seat and socked
the referee.
Quick Start
After the half, the Falcons push-
ed through a few quick ones to
tie the score 62-62 and before
Michigan could recover, squeezed
it up to a six point lead. The Wol
verines, recovering from the shock
of- a shattering 1-3-1 zone de-
fense, battled back to within one
on three quick Bob Sullivan points.
But Michigan again turned cold.
Dennis Stewart, whose outside
shot ran down Houston, was unable
to hit, and the rebounds all fell
into the hands of hustling Bowl-
ing Green. The Falcons again
swept past them, this time mov-
ing out by as much as 11 points
at one time.
But on came the gallant Craig
Dill in his best performance of
the season, leading the power
stroke that put the Wolverines
within three points in the last 17
seconds. His frenzied show wasn't
goodenough, however, as the Birds
piled on a few more points to
salve their fans.
Back to Sophs.
Michigan head Coach Dave
Strack muttered afterwards, "They
switched the defense from man-.
to-man to zone and that really
flustered us. We lost a little poise,
looking more like a bunch of

High scorer for both teams with
33 markers, Walt Piatkowski, was
characterized by Bowling Green
coach Warren "Porky" Scholler as
"a good ball handler and angood
shot." Piatkowski, at 6'8" and 235
pounds with a Bill Buntin phys-
ique, showed ability as a rebound-
er, as he led the Falcons in that
deparement with 12.
Hendrix Hits 20,
He was followed up by Rich
Hendrix, whose 20 points came
mostly in the critical part of the
ksecond half, and Al Hairston, who
knocked in a total or 13.
Michigan's unsinkable Strack
added, "Discounting the shatter-
ing drives in the second half, we
played a very decent game, making
two 'respectable' comebacks." He
cited Center Craig Dill as playing
his best game, "equally strong on
both ends-scoring and rebound-
ing." In his accustomed loping
style Dill only this time perhaps
with more agility than usual. The
lanky senior racked up 25 points
and came or the boards with 19.
The Balding Scholler admitted
that he hurt them especially the
first half. Stewart and Jim Pitts
looked good early but the sleepy-
eyed Stewart, just was boxed ef-
fectively, for the majority of the
second half, and rimmed most of
his 20 points in the first stanza.
Pitts finished with 17.
Surprise Move
One surprising change in Stack's
lne-up was the addition of Dave
McClellan when Michigan was
deep in trouble. Rationalized

Strack, "We needea something
right then and McClellan is a goodi
outside shooter against a zone.J
And I thought any kind of changet
might spark up for a comeback."
But as itaturned out, the Wolver-
ines were too deep in trouble to
bail themselves out.
"The thing that we lacked in
this game was patience, summar-
ized Strack. "We didn't settle
down. But this is a mark of in-
experience, and we're a good
enough team that we'll learn from
this game."
Bowling Green, however,'felt no
need to talk about the team as
they swarmed onto the wooden
floor. In paroxysm of delight, they
baskets, a rite usually reserved for
snipped off the sets from the
feats comparable to winning the
Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
West Virginia 99, VMI 75
Lasaile 99, Miami (Fla) 82
Bradley 108, Murray State 85
Detroit 74, Notre Dame 73
DePaul 85, St. John's (Minn) 64
Connecticut 77, New Hampshire 56
Ohio U. 91, Indiana 90 (ovt)
Providence 76, Brown 62
Georgia 89, Georgia Tech 87
New Mexico 77, Loyola (LA) 59
Maryland 54, No. Carolina State 38
Boston College 93," Fairfield' 76
Rhode Island 99, Manhattan 86
Eastern Michigan 85, Adrian 54
Western Michigan 90, Bali State 85
NBA
New York 118, Detroit 116
Baltimore 116, San Francisco 106
Boston 119, Cincinnati 91
Philadelphia 117, Chicago 103
St. Louis at Los Angeles (nc)
NHL
Montreal 6, Toronto 3
New York 4, Boston 2

10-83
NCAA's. Once outside the arena
itself, however, the mob trans-
formed itself into a sane and or-
derly crowd and one former fem-
inine super-booster even admitted,
"My ears hurt so. I can't even
hear anymore."
Bowled Over

Sullivan
Stewart
Dill
Pitts
Bankey
Maxey
Adams
McClellan
Totals

MICHIGAN
G FRI
3-10 6-8 10
9-26 2-47
10-17 5-6 19
6-15 5-9 10
1-2 1-1 1
1-7 2-2 0
0-0 2-2 0
0-0 0-0 0
30-76 23-32 52

P T
3 12
2 20
0 25
4 17
1 3
4 4
1 2
1,0
16 83

First
Choice
Of The
Engagea bles
And, for good reasons . .. like smart styling
to enhance the center diamond . . . guaranteed
perfect (or replacement assured) . . . a brilliant
gem of fine color and precise modern cut. The
name, Keepsake, in your ring assures lifetime sat-
isfaction. Select your very personal Keepsake at
your Keepsake Jeweler's store. Find him in the
yellow pages under "Jewelers."

BOWLING GREEN

Piatkowski
Henderson
Dixon
Hairston
Hendrix
Assenheimer
Benedict
Rodgers
Totals

G F R P T
16-29 1-2 12 4 33
4-8 2-4 10 4 10
2-6 1-2 11 4 5
5-18 3-3 4 3 13
8-19 4-5 7 3 20
2-8 1-3 10 1 5
2-2 0-0 3 1 4
0-0 0-0 0 0 0
39-90 12 29 61 20 90

MICHIGAN 53 30-83
BOWLING GREEN 44 46-90

WALT PIATKOWSKI

sophomores than we did against
Houston."
The number of turnovers was
fantastic. During one frenzied
stretch it seemed like a high speed
game of catch. Only the Falcons
were able to take advantage of
them when it counted and the
Wolverines could not transform
BG debits in to Michigan credits.
The result was a fast-moving,
sprawling game.

ri

II

COME to
MIDDLE EARTH!
J. R. R. TOLKIEN'S
wonderful world of fantasy
Read
THE HOBBIT

Presents an exhibition
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Free to
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0 0
Students
250 to others
A new booklet, published by a
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Daumier
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Cassatt Maillol Toulouse-Lautrec
Corinth Picasso Rouault
Dufy Renoir Van Dongen
and many others moderately priced

"The Lord of the Rings" Trilog'
THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RIN
THE TWO TOWERS
THE RETURN OF THE KING
and
THE TOLKIEN READER
95c each
wherever
BALLANTINE BOOKS
.:are sold
~/Iij4.

'y
1G
V-

j
i " i

Bell Tower

Motel, Room
Saturday,

202 'Friday, December 9, 1966-1:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
December 10, 1966-10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

L

Q

J

Are you going
to buy the kids
a sub-machine gunk
for Christmas?

o*

This is your chance,
Student #7026941.
Drink Sprite and be
somebody. ___

Engineering seniors: visit the Lockheed suite at the Jack Tar Hotel in
San Francisco, December 27-30 or call Lockheed collect (408) 743-
2801. Spending this Christmas holiday in the San Francisco area?...
then look in on Lockheed at the Jack Tar Hotel. Lockheed's profes-
sional employment team will be conducting interviews that can set you
on the path to a fascinating, high-paying job at Lockheed. They'll be
happy to tell you about new-product development, product diversifica-
tion, company-conducted research, company-paid 'tuition programs,
proximity to universities and research centers...as well as Agena,
Polaris, Poseidon, Deep Submersibles LOCICMEED
and much, much more. An equal oppor- MISSILES & SPACE COMPANY
tunity employer. A GROUP 01VISON Of LOOXIfEE AIRCRAFT CORPORA

. .. a doll that moves its eyes?
How about a game with 9,000
pieces to lose?
Christmas is for kids, you know,
and the stores are full of childish
fancies at fancy prices.
Your college store also has a dif-
ferent kind of present you ought
to consider. Even though they
don't spurt fire, flutter, snap, or
pop, books are wonderful gifts
for children. Especially books
like these.
The award-winning HAILSTONES
AND HALIBUT BONES ($3.25), by
Mary O'Neill with illustrations
by Leonard Weisgard, appeals to
all ages. It's about colors: the
cool green sound of trickling
water, the show-off shout of red,
the quiet white of a pair of whis-
pers talking. You might say it
expands the consciousness.
William Blake's SONGS OF INNO-
CENCE do too, and they're newly
available in two ways. One vol-
ume ($3.50) has the poems and
beautiful illustrations by' Ellen
Raskin. In the other ($3.95),
Miss Raskin has set the poems to
music, as well as illustrating the
book.

Things that move fascinate young
readers or listeners and the ABC
OF CARS AND TRUCKS ($3.25),
by Anne Alexander, shows and
tells about all kinds of vehicles.
Charles Dickens' A CHRISTMAS
CAROL is a traditional pleasure,
and your college store has a lovely
facsimile of the first edition, illus-
trated in color and black and
white ($3.95) . Or look into a
stocking-stuffer-sized book called
A CHRISTMAS PANORAMA ($2.50).
It looks small, but folds out to
over six feet to display, in full
color, two. old favorites : A Par-
tridge in a Pear Tree on one side,
The Friendly Beasts on the other.
The point of allthis isthat what
you give children doesn't have to
be something that won't last past
New Year's Day. Each of these
books - and many others on dis-
play in your college store - will
give hours and months and even
years of friendly companionship.

Take heart. Take a dime.
Then take a bottle of Sprite
from the nearest pop
machine.
Suddenly it's in
your hand. Cold.
Biting. Tart and
tingling. You,
cackle fiendishly
and rub your hands
together. (You
should; they're
probably chilled to
the bone by now.)
You tear off to a
corner, alone, but
within earshot of
your fellows.

/

...

And then? And then? And then you unleash it.
SPRITE! It fizzes! It roars! It bubbles with
good cheer!
Heads turn. Whisperings. "Who's that strangely.

with Old Spice Lime
Precisely what things depends on what you have in
, ',, . "L f I C] 0 T ..,.

;

m LIME

I

Us' '.. 7211

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