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December 08, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8. 1966

PAGETWOTHEMICIGANDAIY TURSAY. EEBER8._ _C

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THEATRE

'Wedding Band' Debut Defiant,
Infused with Honesty, Humor

Students Boycott Classes
Over 'Power' in London

Romney Praises Legislature But ,
Criticizes Unfinished Business

By ANN L. MARCHIO
"Wedding Band" by Alice Chil-
dress made its defiant debut last
night at Mendelssohn Theatre and
set both white folks and black
back in their seats.
Infused with scintillating Negro
humor, the play is quite honest in
its portrayal of the complexities
of inter-racial relationships. How-
ever, this theme provides only the
overtones to what must be one of
the most poignant contemporary
statements made by a Negro;
authoress.
Formulated in exquisitely good
taste, the characters are animated
stereotypes .of both what the Ne-
gro thinks of himself and what the
white people think of him; and
what the white person thinks of
himself and what the Negro thinks
of him. Fanny Johnson, portrayed
by Clarice Taylor, does an ex-
ceptional job in selling herself to
the high traditions, or at least
what she considers high traditions,
of the whites. Her most prized
possession is a silver-plated tea
set, for which she finds many
opportunities to describe as the
"only silver plated tea set owned
by a colored woman here or in any
other part of the world."
Almost pathetic yet terribly of-
fended by sympathy is Lula Green,
played by Minnie Gentry. For her
the search is for a new religion of
praise to God and an acceptance
of her position in life. Without a
semblance of the pride with which
her foster son is overwhelmingly
filled she prostitutes herself before
the court of the white people to
keep those she loves near her, a
sacrifice of her own integrity.
. With the personage of Mattie,
Abbey Lincoln makes her stage
debut. Known 'more formerly as
a recording artist and lyricist,
Miss Lincoln added an extra sur-

prise with an offstage melody dur-
ing the first act. Her sassy retorts
and functional representation of
the race will in all probability
elicit for her the additional title
of actress.
And then there is Ruby Dee (I.e.
Julia Augustine). Having previous-
ly won the affection of Ann Arbor
audiences in her roles in "The'
Oresteia" and "The Birds" at the
Ypsilanti Greek Theatre this sum-
mer, she has now begun the sec-
ond phase of her tradition on
campus. Not only a vibrant per-
sonality off stage, Miss Dee forces
the character of Julia into the
viewer and does not relent until
the climactic conflict at the end
of the first scene.
Of course, some or the laurels
must be shared with the white
gentry. John Harkins presents an
effective dramatization of Her-
man, the forbidden-by-law lover
of ten years to Miss Augustine. He
is not the aristocratic white that
the beautiful Negro woman tradi-
tionally marries. Instead, he is a
baker and not overwhelmingly suc-
cessful at that. However, his
mother, played by .Katherine

Squire of television as well as1
Broadway fame, submits a won-
derfuly stereotyped image of the
shrewish, impenetrable bulwark ofj
white superiority.
The box scenery in the play is
artistically created by Ed Witt-
stein, who won the Obie Award
from the New York critics for his
settings for "Sergeant Musgrave's
Dance" last season. The triple al-
lusion of three dwellings provide
an opportune setting for the med-
ley of the first scene, which weaves
in the spirit of the Negro families,
the white family and the rejected
Julia.
In addition to the fine abilities
of the actors themselves is the
beautifully paced timing of the
production, as directed by Mar-
cella Cisney, also Associate Direc-
tor of the Professional Theatre
Program. Miss Cisney also directed'
last year's premier production of
"An Evening's Frost."
Judging by the enthusiastic
ovation received by this first per-
formance, it would seem that
"Wedding Band" may prove to be
one of the highlights of this year's
tdramatic presentations.

Collegiate Press Service
LONDON, England -- Three
quarters of the London School of
Economics' students boycotted
classes culminating a month of
growing demands for "student
power."
The action secured the school's
recognition of several "fundament-
al" student rights in disciplinary
proceedings.
The basic policy under attack
remains unchanged. Students are
still effectively excluded from any
real decision-making role within
the institution, but their .leaders
view the "battle" as a continuing
one. The boycott's success has bred
a new optimism that communica-
tion and change are possible at
LSE.
The controversy began when the
student's Union questioned the ap-
pointment of a new director Dr.
Walter Adams five weeks earlier
because of his alleged cooperation
with Ian Smith's Rhodesian re-
gime in abandoning racial equality
at that country's University Col-
lege.
The school's response to the
Union since that time broadened
the issue for many students into
a general - concern with their role
in the power hierarchy of the col-
lege.
The administration has taken
the position that it has the final
authority to interpret the Union's
charter, and has indicated it does
not find debate on a new director
inc' led.
Therefore. the Standing Com-
mittee of the school's Court of
Governors has acted to cut off
communication between the Union
and the school about the new di-
rector.
Lord Bridges, Chairman of the
Court, wrote a short letter to The
Times, expressing "indignation"
about "the deliberate campaign
against the character" of Adams,
except that silence might be mis-
interpreted as agreement.
The school sumoned the Presi-
dent of the Union to appear before
the Board of Discipline, because
he signed the Union's reply to
Bridges' letter. which also appear-
ed in The Times.
School regulations prohibit com-
munications to the press by non-
voluntary societies, such as the
student's Union, without the Di-
rector's permission.

Adelstein requested therights
of "natural justice" before the
Disciplinary B o a r d, including
counsel, legal minutes and the dis-
qualification of involved parties
(the Director) from also being
judges.
When the school refused Adel-
stein's request, many students who
had previously been unconcerned
were outraged by what seemed to
them an unfair tribunal.
The Union quickly called a boy-
cott of classes for the day of Adel-
stein's hearing demanding:
-the right of students to ex-
press themselves through their
Union on matters over which stu-
dents are concerned;
-the right of elected represent-
atives to carry out the Union's in-
structions without fear of personal
reprisal; and
-the right of students who are
being disciplined to a fair hearing
in accordance with the tenets of
natural justice.
During the hearing nearly a
hundred students held a sit-in in
the hallway outside the hearing
room. When Prof. B. C. Roberts,
a faculty member of the Court of
Governors was sent by the Board
to disperse the students, a reveal-
ing dialogue developed.
Soon after Adelstein's hearing
began, the board granted his three
procedural requests.
TONIGHT at 8 P.M.
WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDSI

LANSING (k)-Republican Gov.
George Romney told the depart-
ing Democratic Legislature yester-
day its two-year record has been
"impressive, but incomplete."
Romney said that the Legisla-
ture enacted new programs with-
out providing what he termed "an
adequate and equitable tax base"
to finance them..
He predicted a stand - still
budget, which "includes no new
programs or any enrichment of
present programs," would cost
$1.107 billion and cause a defiict
of $29 million.
It is "indeed unfortunate,"
Romney said, that the Legislature
did not adopt a fiscal reform
policy which included a state in-
come tax. He added:
House Democrats. caucused yes-
terday, then broke up until the
legislative session recessed. Spokes-
men said the Democrats still fav-
or the coleadership proposal.
J. Robert Traxler, House Demo-
cratic floor leader, said no elec-
tion was held to pick the party's
candidate for speaker. The voting
was postponed, Traxler said, be-
cause not all caucus members had
been notifed of it.
A Republican caucus unanim-
ously elected Robert Waldron as

its candidate for House speaker
in the next Legislature and unan-
imously rejected a Democratic
proposal for coleadership of the
House.
The Republicans termed the
proposed joint-leadership "un-
workable" and adopted a resolu-
tion saying: "We believe that di-

vided responsibility is no respon-
sibility; that one party must lead
the House if Michigan is to con-
tinue to be a vital force in state
government."
Democrats have said they w ill
try to amend House rules in the
current legislative session to pro-
vide for coleadership in the House.

p

Holding
Again!

1

DIAL
8-6416

"Highest Rating !"-N.Y. Dify News
BURT LANCASTER DiyNw
LEE, XMAVIN ROBERT RYAN-JACK PALANCE
ROLBBELL with CLAUDIACARDINAL]
Tas FROFESSIONBIS
A COLUMBIA PICruRES RELEASE -"PANAVISION-TECHNICOO
"The kind of film one thirsts for !"--Life Magazine
COMING DEC. 15th
"MADRAGOLA"

Advisory Board Aictions
Change Police, Procedures

(Continued from page 1)
have made certain arrests the way
they did, as well as aiding in un-J
derstanding on both sides.
The use of civilian youths to
quell crowds was so successful,
that even now, when much of
the summer's racial tensions have
passed, the police hire civilians to'
be present at large public func-'
tions to prevent any would-be dis-T

rs C pus
THURSDAY, DEC. 8 ducted 'by Theo Alcantaila at
7:00 and 9:0 p.m.-The Cinema Hill Aud.
Guild will run Rene Clair's "Le '8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
Million" in the Architecture Aud. cal Society will present the New
8:$0 p.m-The Travel Film Se- York Pro Musica in "The Play of
ries will present. "Inside and. Out- Daniel," at the First Methodist
side the Iron Curtain" in Aud. A, Church.
Angell Hall. FRIDAY, DEC. 9
8:30 p.m. - The Professional ..7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-The Cinema
Theatre Program New Play Pro- Guild will offer Rene Clair's "Le
ject Performance will give "Wed- Million," at the Architecture Aud,
ding Band," at Lydia Mendelssohn 8:30 p.m.--The University Musi-
Theatre. cal Society will present the New
8:30 pm.-The School of Music York Pro Musica in "The Play of
will present the University Sym- Daniel," at the First Methodist
phony Orchestra in a concert con- Church.
i.....rr....rmr.r.-ra..rar..mmin.inin...mmm.m.m ...m
* II
I I
I I
I U
VLE MILLION-Dec. 8 & 9
1 (di r.Rene Clair-1931)I
r, ;French, subtitles. Musical comedy in the tradi-
Stion of-"Sous les Toits de Paris" and "The
i ~Umbrellas. of Cherbourg." "Among the best '
' films ever made."-London Times. i
- SHORTS: A PROGRAM OF EARY CARTOONS a
* I
I I
EBRINK OF LIFE-Dec. 10A& 11 m
I I
(dir. Inmar Bergman-1958)
'Swedish, subtitles. The lives of three women
Starrrng Eva Dahlbeck nrirdTher iand Bb
Anderson
x , CANNES FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS: Best e
actress, best director
No-"SHORT: "SOLDIER MAN"
aa
;. GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933--
:LDec.e 15 & 16
* (dir.Busby Berkley--1 933)
Y, American. Starring Dick Powell, Joan Blondell
' Ginger Rogers, Aline McMahon, Ned Sparks
S The chmpiest of camp, includes "The Forgot-
' ' ten Man" sequence. Pre-censorship and un-cut.
I I
S SHORT- "PARALYMPICS"
i THE , C U S-Dec. 17 & 184
(dir. Charlie Chapin-1928);
American. Charlie joins the circus by mistake
and ends up a lion tamer, tight rope walker,
and clown. With Myrna Kennedy. Academy
Award to Chaplin "for versatility and genius in
J writig, acting, directing and producing..
SHORTS: "WRONG AGAIN" -- Laurel
1 Hardy, "OUR DAREDEVIL CHIEF," "SUB-
MARINE PILATE" -1

turbances. Larcom asserted that
although it doesn't appear to be
much, the hiring of civilians has
been tremendously effective.
It was with these successes in
mind that Larcom and Chief Kras-
ny have been working to create a
permanent advisory board. Lar-
com and Krasny will appoint the
board members, who will most
likely consist of Chief Krasny as
chairman, another officer from the
police department, the director of
human relations, the city attorney
and a few non-governmental civil-
ian leaders.
The functions of the board
would' be to consider any sug-
gestionsdfor increasing understand-
ing and communication between
the police and the community; to
help recruitment from minority
groups; and to ease tensions in
community incidents. Larcom
strongly emphasized that the ad-
visory board is not a review board.
It could however review the facts
of a case after the intradepart-
mental police review board inves-
tigated an incident, and then make
general suggestions regarding po-
lice procedure.
Tllese suggestions would first go
to Larcom, who would then dis-
cuss them with the chief. Larcom
added. that the board would be
open to policemen as well as
civilians. He reiterated that. "none
of the suggestions will be in any
way binding, neither will they in
any way put any officer on the
spot."
The police have their own in-
twadepartmental review board
headed' by Chief Krasny. It re-
views police conduct from tardi-
ness to ' complaints of violations
of civil rights.
Concern was aroused over the
advisory board when the Ann Ar-
bor News misinterpreted an off-
the-record statement given to the
City Council concerning police-
community relations. "Since the
time of'that statement," Larcom
said, "we've changed the proced-
ure. Now all appointments will be
made by Chief Krasny."
He added that he disagreed with
the chief on some rinor points,
but that he felt since it was the
chief's department he should have
most of the responsibility in creat-
ing, the board.
When asked what he thought
of the. fear of the advisory board
turning into a review board, Kras-
ny said that he didn't think the
community would accept a review
board; and that he would see to it
that the board wouldn't urn into
one.
In a communication to Council
last Monday, Councilmen Cap-
paert and Burns called community
opposition "a slap in the face to
Ann Arbor civil rights leaders who
have worked tirelessly for commu-
nity relations."
Wheeler indicated that many of
these leaders exposed themselves
to danger in quelling this sum-
mer's tensions.

11
Is.

Ann Arbor Dance Theatre
free
WORKSHOP
on
LABANOTATION
by
Janet Wind Descutner
Thurs., Dec. 8" p.m.
Public Library

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PRESENTS
A CARLO PONTI PRODQUCTI
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF SORS PASTERNAKS
DOCIOR.
ZHIAGO
IN PANAVISION*AND METROCOLOR
Nights Except Matinees on
Sunday at 8 P.M. Sat. & Sun. at
Sunday at 7:30 1:30$.
All Night Seats Sat. Mat. $1.50
$2.25 Sun. Mat. $2.25

I

I

For Ann Arbor.. ...a di

i

istinguished event!
EXCLUSIVE
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
2REMAINING
DAYS ONLY
NOT Reserved-Seat Policy!
Continuous Performances
at Popular Prices!
ATE

Poweru Pertinent!

Wed.-Sun.
8:30 P.M.

[SEATSIM
:a f.NOW !I

atinees, 2:30 P.M.
Sat.-Sun.

A-I

THREE
PERFORMANCES DAILY
ot 1:00-4:30
8:15

Program Information 6 NO 2-6264

Remember the date!
Thursday, January 5
Day Before Resumption of Classes
HILLEL MIXER
Live Band
Refreshments
members free others 1.00
1429 Hill
All Welcome

Special Presentation
THREE PERFORMANCES OF THE 12TH CENTURY MUSICAL DRAMA
L
performed by
THE NEW YORK PRO MUSICA
in the Sanctuary of the
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
TONIGHT
and
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
at 8:30 P.M.
(A 75-minute Performance, 'without intermission)

1.

TWO DAYS FREE FROM CLASSES & EXAMS,

TRICININAMUILD

celebrates with

W.C. FIELDS FILMS

7:00 and 9:0(-Monday, Dec. 12

TlrvcTC.

'AA A I KI PI nn t? T, S 00 n n A ': 4 nn

IiII.. I tK l : MI tV I'4 L'.J'JI, .VV . C. uIu'C FV

I

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