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December 06, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-06

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6,1966

J

Cagers
By HOWARD KOHN

Hustle

Houston,

86-75

A.

A ringing, 20-foot "stuff" splat-
tered through again and again.
Dennis S t e w a rt could have
bounced the ball in off his shoe-
laces.
A whipping, back-handed, shot-
gun pass hit the Michigan man
under the basket and in went a
soft-shoe lay-up. Ken Maxey could
have passed Medicare with Barry
Goldwater as God.
Stewart hitting from the out-
side corner . . . Maxey running
past, through, over and into every-
one in sight .., an expanding zone
defense .. . the new look of the
Michigan Wolverines. Only Yost
Fieldhouse was the same.
"We've got a spunky club,"
(Dennis Bankey played. despite a
case of the flu) praised Dave
Strack, head coach of the last
night's upstart winiers. "And any-
time you mention spunk or speed,
you have to mention Maxey."
As a second-string sophomore
guard, Maxey attracted super-loud
applause from Cazzie-less Yost
fans even as he crouched behind
the scorer's table.
Maxey went to the same high
school as Cazzie, and he has the
same dramatic flair.
He isn't a Cazzie, of course. He
never will be. He's eight inches
smaller and a hell of a lot faster.
He runs, runs, runs . . covering up
his mistakes-which are there-'
with a gutsy stamina.
"I'd have to say he's real quick,"
said Houston coach Guy Lewis.
On a one-on-one breakaway
with All-American Elvin Hayes
steamrolling in for the lay-up,
Maxey calmly flashed into position
in front of Hayes and the split-
faced grinner charged right into a
f oul.
Even without Maxey, Hayes had
his problems. The six goal-tending
calls on him ranked him as one
of Michigan's leading scorers.
Lewis took only a little time out
to quibble with the officials' opin-
* * *
Ill'n' Ni 'Cat
7111 'iats
By The Associated Press
LEXINGTON - Ron Dunlap
dropped in a couple of free
throws with 2:15 to go in overtime
last night and lifted Illinois to a
98-97 upset of Kentucky, the na-
tion's third-ranked college basket-
ball team.
Illinois never trailed, as Ken-
tucky had to come from behind
on two free throws by Thad Jar-
acz to tie it at 85-85 with 35 sec-
onds to go in regulation time and
force an overtime. ,
The Illini, who used their big
ment to their best advantage
throughout, quickly took the lead
again in overtime on a tipin by
Rich Jones.,
Kentucky was led by Dampier's
40 points.
Jones led the Illinois scoring

Stewart f
Sullivan f
Dill c
Pitts g
Bankey g
Maxey g
Adams f
McClellan f
Totals
Bell f
Hayes I
Kruse c
Grider g
Chaney g
Lentz f
Spain f
Starks g
Lewis g
Leg I
Benson I
Totals
MICHIGAN
HOUSTON

MICHIGAN
G F R
11120 1-2 11
7-14 2-3 12
7-18 1-1 7
6-15 4-5 7
1-3 1-1 5
6-10 0-1 2
0-2 1-1 1
0-0 0-0 0
38-82 10-14 491
HOUSTON
G F R
5-20 1-2 17
10-25 5-9 17
3-9 0-1 4
4-10 1-1 10
4-20 0-1 11
5-11 0-1 11
1-1 0-0 1
0-0 2-2 1
0-2 2-2 1
0-2 0-0 0
0-0 0-0 0

P T
5 23
4 16
2 1S
1 16
0 3
3 12
2 1
0 0
17 86
P T
1 11
2 25
1 6
2 9
5 8
1 10
0 2
0 2
1 2
0 0
0 0
13 75
6-86
37-75

By DAN OKRENT Elvin Hayes - Houston's All- ing again after being tied, 48-48. 20 as he couldn't take advantage
An innovatory zone defense and America forward scored 12 points Stewart's unerring jumpers from of his height when forced outside
a startling rebuttal of so-called for Michigan, being called for the right side of the basket led by the adept Wolverines.
"statistical truth" enabled Dave goaltending six times, three in the drive that enabled Michigan Teamwork
Strack's underdog Wolverines to each half. to remain at least five points up It was truly a team effort for
h a n d Houston's sixth - ranked It was that kind of night. for the entire last ten minutes Michigan. Center Craig Dill, look-
Cougars a stunning 86-75 upset in of the game. ing more at home up front than
Gone Gone Gone.
- nsi nyuu ~cieun

Yost Field House last night.
Emerging 'from the depths of
two earlier defeats meted out by
Tennessee and Duke, the green
Michigan quintet settled down af-,
ter a somewhat erratic first half1

vva , V a , V . . .
Things couldn't have been better
as the Michigan five made their
return to Yost in what might, un-
derstatedly, be called one of the?
most apprehensively - looked - at

32-100 11-19 80:
40 41
38 3'

ion after the game, "I disagree!
with them, but there's no useI
bitching about the officiating1
now."
Lewis, in fact, was more con-
cerned about the shoddy perform-
ance of his nationally-ranked
team. "I wasn't satisfied with a
thing they did tonight," he ground
out through tightened lips.
"There's no denying that Mich-
igan has a good team after what
I saw, but I was extremely dis-
appointed with our shooting, he
added.
Although -Lewis could not re-
member Stewart's name, he did
remember his number ani his
classic shot. "That number 40, he
was all right out, there in that
corner."
Strack praised Michigan' s team
effort and the effectuality of a'
strong zone defense. "We kept con-
trol of the ball on offense. Once
we got the ball, we didn't go for
the break right away. We gct
someone under the basket and3
worked the ball into him.
"We played smarter ball. Itt
helped. of course, that we didn't
fall behind as in our first two
games where we were playing des-
perate catch-up ball.
Strack called three timeouts in
the last ten minutes of the game
to help break up any concerted
Houston rally and help his players
keep their cool.
The zone defense, though, was
a veritable stroke .of genius. Hous-
ton stumbled into the arm-wav-
ing Wolverines, played monkey-in-
the-middle and then ended up try-
ing 30-foot panic shots.
"It really worked well," empha-
sized Strack. "In the first half
we played it a little too wide, but
we tightened up in the second half
and really held them down."
Pleased, relieved, excited and
titillated by the first victory of
the season, Strack .joked easily in
the locker room. "Well, we're not
really gunning to keep our place
in the rankings, but ...
"I have no complaints. It's fun
to really win one.
In his enthusiasm, Strack re-
minded the gathering crowd of
sportswriters that 'Michigan is go-
ing to be a threat in the Big Ten.
"I think we've shown that we
can hurt a team."
Lewis gave a sullen, matter-of-
fact explanation in terms of miss-
ed baskets and sloppy play. But,
then in almost an adamant co,-
fession, he added: "I'll tell you
how it was. Michigan came out to
win . .. and they did. They want-
ed the game."

and played with the aplomb and events in recent Michigan athletic
the class of seasoned veterans, history. Cazzie Russell was gone,
It was wonderful. Oliver Darden was gone, all the
Kenny Maxey-he came out on rest that had made up the starting
the court i the second half for fives for three consecutive Big
keeps and flashed around his 160 Ten championships had passed
pounds like a whirling dervish, onto fields of post-graduation, and
passing to the right, dribbling to one of the only non-sellouts in re-
the left, shooting the rubber cent years was attended more by
sphere straight up and in. the skeptic than by the believer.
That Kid But as an ingeniously-constructed
Dennis Stewart-the 6'6"' whiz three-two shifting zone marked
from Steelton, Pa., got into foul telling blows to the formidable
trouble early in the game, then Houston five, the skepticism pass-
keyed his play to the outside, con- ed into enthusiasm.
necting for 19 points in the sec- The game started on an uneasy
ond half. Houston Coach Guy note, as Houston took but ten sec-
Lewis remarked that he didn't onds to sink their first two-point-
know "that that kid had such an er. But Michigan quickly retali-
outside shot." Strack commented ated, and in between first-home-
that "maybe he (Stewart) is game jitters that spelled eight first
learning something." half turnovers, the Houston ad-
Jim Pitts-the 6'3" sparkplug vantage was turned into a Mich-
who is listed as a guard but who igan lead, as sophomore forward
played forward like ,a star next to Bob Sullivan sparked an attack
men five inches and 40 pounds his that resulted in a 24-13 tally with
superior: all over the court, the first period half gone. After
"Jumping Jim" shut down the big staving off numerous Houston
Houston guns like a man twice his challenges, Michigan was on top
size." at the half by a precarious two-
point margin, 40-38.
e u~.e Then, the second half. As Maxey
Ir s joined the starting five (minus
co-captain Dennis Bankey, who
was benched after playing' the
IT , 0 first few minutes of the half un-
der the aura of a minor case of
influenza), Michigan started roll-

While Houston took to the court
behind Hayes at the start of theI
game, the spectator was rare who
did not notice the obvious size
differential - the type of thing
that has always contributed to
Michigan victory in the past. But!
this time, Strack's boys were ob-
viously on the other side of the
fence. Houston outweighed Mich-
igan by 20 pounds per man (their
front three averages over 230
pounds at each position), and had
inches of height over Michigan's
starting alignment. All this, not!
to mention All-America Hayes
and sophomore Melvin Bell, who
averaged over 24 points in Hous-
ton's two previous victories.

he has in anybody's recollection,
managed to swing enough of his
215 pounds to facilitate the
smaller men's scrambling in and
around the key, and served as an.
admirable bulwark in the shifting
defense.
Houston Coach Lewis said it well
when asked if anything happened
that he didn't expect. Coolly and
somewhat reflectively, the man
who had all the reason in Dr.
John Naismith's world to look for-
ward to what might have been
an unbeaten season, replied: "Yes.
We were beaten."
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN SUTKUS

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4

A

The Vise-Press
But Strack's strategy paid off.
Houston was continually pressed
into bad shots by the vise-like
zone, and they notched an unbe-
lievably poor 32 per cent from the
floor, as opposed to Michigan's 47
per cent. Perhaps the most re-
markable statistic, however, was
Houston'sbackboard dominance,
as they snared 80 rebounds to!
Michigan's 49. But rebounds
aren't points, particularly when
men like big gun Hayes look like
fish out of water when forced-
as he was-to go outside the foul
lane to get their points.
And even Hayes was not much
above the Cougar norm, account-
ing for only 40 per cent accuracy
in his 25 efforts. Don Chaney, a
6'5" guard who was neatly han-
dled by an alternation of Pitts and
Sullivan. collected a dismal 4 for

drecords,
NEW on ATLANTIC records
JAZZ:

By The Associated Press
Notre Dame is the national
college football champion for the
first time since 1949. The Irish
handily defeated Michigan State
in the Associated Press' final poll
of the 1966 season while Alabama,
the defending titleholder, placed
third.
The crimson Tide's 3-1 victory
over Auburn last Saturday, their
10th in an unbeaten-untied string,
made no distinguishable impres-
sion on the AP's national panel of
sports writers and broadcasters.
Alabama won the 1965 national
title when it beat Nebraska in the
Orange Bowl and Michigan State
lost to UCLA in the Rose Bowl.
Alabama faces Nebraska in the
Cotton Bowl next month. Notre
Dame and Michigan State will not
play postseason games.
The Top Ten, with first place
votes in parentheses, season
records and total points on a
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:
1.Notre Dame (41) 9-0-1 506
.2. Michigan State (8) 9-0-1 471
3.Alabama (7) 10-0-0 428
4. Georgia 9-1-0 332
5. UCLA 9-1-0 291
6. Nebraska 9-1-0 224
7. Purdue 8-2-0 193
8. Georiga Tech 9-1-0 165
9. Miami, Fla. 7-2-1 76
10. Southern Methodist 8-2-0 62
Others receiving votes, listed
alphabetically: Arkansas, Army,
Florida, Houston, Mississippi,
Oregon State, Southern Califor-
nia, Syracuse, Tennessee, Vir-
ginia Tech, Wyoming.

lP+
Ur.. i r c0 '1
cI"Il"

r'rotessioiicti o t iiliiii ;n

NFL
Eastern Conference

AFL
Eastern Division
w

and POETRY:

Dallas
St. Louis
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Washington
Pittsburgh
Atlanta
New York

W L
9 2
8 3
84
7 5
6 6
3 8
r 10
1 10

T
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1

Pet.
.818
.727
.667
.583
.500
.273
.167
.091
.811
.667
.615
.500
.400
.333
.273

L

Western Conference

'T

Green Bay
Baltimore
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota

10 2
8 4
8 5
46
4 8
3 8

Boston 32
Buffalo 8 41
New York 5 5
Houston 3 9
Miami 2 101
Western Division
xKansas City 9 21
Oakland 7 5
ISan Diego u 51
Denver4 4 8
x-Clinched division title.
SATURDAY'S RESULT
Oakland 28, New York 28 (tie)
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
D~enver 17. Miami 7
San Diego 28, Houston 22
Boston 14, Buffalo 3
SUNDAY'S GAMES
New York at San Diego
Denver at Oakland
Boston at Houston
Kansas City at Miami

'T
2
1
0
0
I
1
i
p

Pet.
.700
.667
.500
.250
.167
.818
.583
.545
.333

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Dallas :31, St. Louir l7
Green Bay 20, San Francisco 7
Cleveland 49, New York 40
Baltimore 21, Chicago 16
Atlanta 20, Minnesota 13
Philade"phia 27, Pittsiirgh 23
Los Angeles 23, Detroit 3
SATUR DAY'S GAME
Green Bay at Baltimore
SUNDAY'S GAMES
'Minnesota at Detroit
Chicago at San Francisco
Clevelanid at Philadelphia
Pittsburgh at New York
St. Louis at Atlanta
Washington at Dallas

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with 32 points, while Deon
ner added 23..

Fless-I

Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Purdue 74, Ohio U, 71
Indiana 77, Missouri 65
Iowa State 87, Minnesota 69
Michigan State 81, South Dakota 54
Northwestern 120, Bali State 83
Kansas 94, Ohio State 70
Creighton 69, Iowa 68 j

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