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August 30, 1966 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

121 YEARS OF FRATERNITY TRADITION

SCHOLASTIC EXCELLENCE: The basic purpose of
college is to obtain an education. Sororities and
fraternities seek not merely minimum scholastic re-
quirements, but achievements above average. The
chapter makes perhaps its most vital contribution to
the individual member by maintaining an environment
that encourages diligent study and by providing special
incentives for superior scholarship.
EXPERIENCES IN EDUCATION: A valuable supple-
ment to the formal classroom is provided by informal
faculty dinners and discussions. Without investigation
and evaluation of ideas and concepts education is
static.,
MATURITY: Since its earliest days the Greek Sys-
tem has taught and exemplified the idea that each
member is a man or woman, not a child, and must
assume adult responsibilities. In his chapter house.
the student grows to maturity.

living inherently encourages awareness of one's self'
and others. A man becomes fully educated only
through learning to take a part in life with others.
FELLOWSHIP: Beyond all else, sororities and fra-
ternities 'offer close, warm friendship and within this,
participate in activities which encourage the indi-
vidual to expand his contacts with others. The fellow-
ship found in the Greek System gains deeper meaning
with shared efforts in college and expands to all
members in later years.
DISCIPLINE AND RESPONSIBILITY: The right to
budget one's time, the acceptance of the responsibility
as an individual and as part of a group and the ability
to rise above distractions all require discipline, self-im-
posed. These are lessons that the sororities and fra-
ternities teach.
TRAINING AND LEADERSHIP: Within the chapter,
men and women gain valuable experience in leader-
ship as thev learn to make decisions and carry out

worthwhile programs through careful planning and
dynamic command. Beyond the chapter, additional
opportunities for leadership and experience are pro-
vided in the executive offices of Panhellenic Associa-
tion and Interfraternity Council-
HUMAN RELATIONS: Man's meteoric progress in
science, due to intense research, calls for equal pro-
gress in human understanding. Sororities and fra-
ternities are research laboratories in human relations:
distilling man's views, precipitating joint action, cat-
alyzing thought, evaporating prejudice, and blending
effort.
BROADENING INTERESTS: As the world shrinks,
men can no longer live isolated from the problems of
peoples in other lands. Sororities and fraternities build
unity out of diversity, broadening the interest of their
members in the world at large.

consideration for the rights of others. In a sorority
and fraternity the members learn that each must
bear his full share according to his talents.
STANDARDS: Sororities and fraternities believe that
standards of conduct, responsibility and attainment,
voluntarily accepted by those who have chosen one
another for compatibility and common purpose, pro-
vide a positive incentive that enhances the college
curriculum.
THE ENRICHING YEARS: College days soon pass,
but the memories remain for a lifetime. The unique
adventure in the brotherhood of Greek living enriches
those memories.
CHOICE: When confronted with a choice, an aware
individual prefaces his final decision by a period of
evaluation so that a valid perspective is determined.
The Greek System is a choice; the decision to Join is
yours alone.

TOTAL EDUCATION:
value of the individual,

Based on respect and the
sorority and fraternity group

MICHIGAN FRATER NITY SYSTEM-a
repeat winner of the "Iron Man Trophy"
for the best system in the ne-+ion.

i

CONSIDERATION FOR OTHERS: Group effort
succeeds only in an atmosphere of cooperation and

GREEKS

A'T

MICHIGAN

TljESDAv. AUG. 30, 1966

SUPPLEMENT to THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FOUR PAGES

"Fraternities have been an integral part of the social
and academic life of the University of Michigan for

122 years.

In the main, the record which they have

established has been important and significant. The
irresponsibility and separation from the main stream
of University life which at one time was a studied as-
pect of our fraternities has given way to greater intel-

lectual interests.

Horseplay has been replaced with

more mature attitudes and activities. Our fraternities
have assumed a position of leadership and are con-
sciously striving to improve not only themselves but
the University of which they are a part."
ar/an i acher
President,
University of Michigan

irbis foutr-page sectiom
is paid for in full by The
University of Michigan's
Inier f raterutity Council.
and Paniellenic Association

m

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