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December 02, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1966E

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2,1986 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Widb

By HOWARD KOHN
Special To The Daily
KNOXVILLE-During the pre-
game show on a Knoxville radio
station last night, the announcer
called Tennessee's Ron Widby
"just a friendly home-town boy
who likes the mountain air."
Minutes later, deep in Davey
Crockett country, Widby went out
and smilingly treed Michigan's
young basketball team 72-54 in the
season's opener for both teams.
Teaming with giant-sized seven-
foot Tom Boerwinkle, Widby led
a Tennessee hunting safari-on a
synthetic rubberized floor made of
Tartan-which flushed out the ex-
pected tell-tale mistakes of Wol-
verine inexperience.
Knoxville-born, Widby is a six-
foot, four-inch senior who led the
Vols in scoring last year, took
time out to do the punting for the,
football team this fall, and started
his final season by ramming home
a game-leading 27 points last
night.

,1Vol
"Widby has a great touch. He
really knows how to handle the
ball and he doesn't need much
daylight to shoot," praised Mich-
igan coach Dave Strack after-
ward.
Tennessee's defense - oriented
Ray Mears took time out from
lauding his mastermind defensive
work to echo Strack's words. "He
can think faster on his feet than
George Wallace," laughed Mears.
Widby- plays the high post at
~the circle in Tennessee's' one-
three-one flanking offense. Boer-
winkle plays the low post under
the boards.
Mears' exuberance pierced the
smoggyslocker room air with con-
gratulations for everyone on the
Vol team. "This was a big game
for us. I think we did a good job.
This is really going to help us
go . . . but I'm glad it's over.'
Hidden Mistakes
The Volunteers covered up their
first-half inconsistency with a'
powerful (second-half exhibition
of shooting and rebounding to

coast into the final 18 point mar-
gin.
A ten-point spurt - electrified
by Widby's two jumpers and Boer-
winkle's mastery of the boards-
snapped a 33-33 tie early in the
second half and put the Vols in
charge.
Craig Dill's soft layup with 6:22'
left dragged Michigan back within
five points, 54-49, but seven con-
secutive points by Boerwinkle
(who looks deceptively like Bull-
winkle) settled the vendetta.
Boerwinkle's 12 rebounds, tops in
the game, totally wiped out Mich-
igan's puny backboard strength.
Defense vs. Defense
In the first 20 minutes, Mich-I
igan's oscillating full-court press
and Tennessee's fluid man-to-man
defense kept the score down to a
32-30 halftime lead for the Vols.
Dennis Bankey's two breakawayI
layups in the first two minutes of
play shot 20-point underdog Mich-
igan into a 5-0 lead-a lead which
lasted only until Widby began

a
k
f]
a
h
t
e
'c
ts
"d
;h
g
s
p

Defen

se Choke Cagers
pumping in the ball from behindon intercepted passes than a pan- 34.1 per cent in the second half,
Boerwinkle-anchored screen. cake baker with three hands. And while Tennessee's climbed from
Widby's 20-foot push-up jumpers with the channel closed under- 46.9 to 53.9.
ept the Vols even with Michigan's neath the basket, Dill and Ste- Stewart and Pitts each finished
ront-court combination of Dill wart were forced into shooting with 13 points and Dill with 12 to
.nd Stewart in the seesaw first less effective shots from outside pace the Wolverines.
zalf, the circle. "Our major problem was that
Finally, with 10:26 gone in the Michigan's first-half 52.2 per- we compounded our mistakes in a
ialf, Widby rammed home a tip-in centage from the floor dipped to hurry. When a team can get ten
o give Tennessee the two-point straight points in a couple of min-
dge it controlled until intermis- utes, you know that somebody's
ion. ScaresImaking a lot of errors," explained
A smooth slap-in by Jim Pitts, COLLEGE BASKETBALL Strack.
vhom Strack called his "most Detroit U. 87, Windsor U. 56 "We played desperate basketball
consistent player in the game," Cincinnati 85, Geo. Washington 61 in the second half. You don't get
ifted Michigan into that 33-.33 Creighton 78, Oklahoma State 76 i h eodhl.Yudntgt
teadlock shortly after the second- Ohio State 74, Butler 67 back into the game by trying 35-
Michigan State 77, W. Michigan 55 foot jump shots like we did. We
"alf buzzer. Bawling Green 97, Ball State 87 simply didn't play smart catch-up
"After that, I didn't like the Davidson 76, Wake Forest 63 simly intpa.satcthu
;ame very well," said Strack. Minnesota 60, Kansas State 59
On the Bl~e End Bradley 89, North Dakota 77 "I think that this game points
On tend- Blue sVanderbilt 76, Western Kentucky 70 up the main weakness of the team
Mear's' second - half strategy Houston 96, Albuquerque 84 --that when we get the ball we'll
trangled Michigan's open-lane Kansas 73, Arkansas 57
Notre Dame 58, Lewis 51 have to make sure we at least get
gassing from the corner inside to Texas Western 78, Sam Houston St. 54 off a shot at the basket."
Dill andI Stewrt. r r1'OQU the f~I

zlupf Sprite.
It makes
plenty of noise
all by itself.

Pleas e

don't

Sprite, you recall, is
the soft drink that's
so tart and tingling,
we just couldn't keep
it quiet.
Flip its lid and it
really flips.
Bubbling, fizzing,
gurgling, hissing and
carrying on all over
the place.
An almost exces-
sively lively drink.
Hence, to zlupf is
to err.
What is zlupfing?

Auk

Wolverines into more turnovers
All Vol-ed Up

FINAL WARM-UP:
Icers Tangle with Waterloo

By DAVE WEIR
With the University sequicen-
tennial activities approaching,
Michigan's hockey team has ap-
parently decided to celebrate their
M version of the historic "Battle of
Waterloo" a little early.
Scene of the conflict will be the
Coliseum at 8 p.m. tonight. The
invaders are known as the Golden
Hawks and they hail from one of
those small Canadian town where
the kids learn how to skate before
* they can talk. The big "W" on
their uniforms stands for Water-
loo Lutheran College.I
Actually, tonight's match comes
only one year after the first series
between the two outfits, which
resulted in a Wolverine victory of
9-4 in a similar Friday night en-
counter followed by a 2-1 defeat
the next night.,
The games with Waterloo will
be the final warmups, for the
UCLA's Lynn
Suspended
LOS ANGELES ()-The UCLA
athletic department said yesterday
that Mike Lynn, 21, only starting
senior on the Bruin basketball
M team, has been suspended from
the squad pending study of his
arrest on suspicion of forgery.
Lynn, of Covina, Calif., and
Larry, McCollister, 21, Lemon
Grove, Calif., were taken into
custody Wednesday after allegedly
trying to buy music records at a
* department store with a credit
card issued to someone else.
A UCLA spokesman said Lynn
will remain on the basketball)
squad until his involvement, if
any, is determined.

Michigan icers before the opening
of the Western Collegiate Hockey
Association season against Michi-
gan State in East Lansing next
weekend.
Chatham Felled Twice
The Hawks are 2-1 on the sea-
son thus far, while the Wolverines
have two victories over the Chat-
ham Junior to their credit.
A number of sophomore stand-
outs dominate the Waterloo club,
led by left wing Norm Allen, who
scored twice in last year's games,
including the winning goal in the
second contest. Two other sec-
ond-year men who were impres-
sive a year ago are center Dave
Tucker and left wing John O'Fla-
herty.
Michigan coach Al Renfrew re-
members O'Flaherty as "one of
their best players last season, even
though he was a freshman."
Another sophomore for Water-
loo, goalie Ken Payne, drew praise
from Renfrew for his part in the
Canadian victory last year. The
165-pound netminder stopped 30
Michigan shots en route to the 2-1
win. This season, he will share
goaltending duties with Jim Hau-
raney, a senior from Brockville.
Herman Starts in Nets
The Hawks' captain is senior
Larry Banks, a defenseman who
hails from Waterloo's "twin-city"
of Kitchener, Ontario.
The Wolverines will be attemp-
ting to continue their winning
ways started last weekend against
Chatham, when they racked up
8-4 and 6-0 victories. Harold Her-
man is expected to start in the
nets in tonight's game, while
sophomore Jim Keough, who was
credited with the shutout in last
Saturday's game, will be the goalie
in tomorrow's contest. Renfrew
indicated that he has not decided
on who will be number one net-

minder for the Wolverines as of
yet.
Renfrew said that he would wait
until after this series to make any
changes in the starting lineups,
since "it's really too marly yet to
determine which combinations are
working best."
Renfrew lists several objectives
for this weekend's series. "We are
going to have to work on oecoming
a scoring threat while at full-
strength .. . so far our goals have:
come when we have had manhad-
vantage.
"Thus far our defense has been'
pretty good, but that's because the
forwardsohave been coming back
to help cover. We will have to start
covering the wings in our own end
a little better and our forechecking
will have to improve."
Renfrew added that his charges
"have a long way to go :f we are
to catch the other fine teams in
the WCHA."

Sullivan f
Stewart f
Dill c
Bankey g
Pitts g
McClellan
Adams
Maxey
Totals
Wid by
Hendrix
Boerwinkle
Justus
Hann
Coffman
Bell
Totals

MICHIGAN
G F R
2-4 '0-2 '1
4-13 5-5 5
4-9 4-5 3
2-2 1-2 2
5-11 3-5 4
0-0 0-0 d
1-1 0-0 2
1-4 3-4 2
19-44 16-33 28
Tennessee
G F R
13-24 1-2 9
4-11 0-1 2
6-11 2-3 12
4-8 4-5 9
2-4 2-4 0
0-1 1-2 1
1-1 0-0 0
30-60 12-17 39

P'
1
41
21
4
21
0
1
4
185

T
4
13
12
5
13
0
2
5
54

PLUM STREET
comes to Ann Arbor
at
c-a - ar
from ti eoyster
109 S. FOURTH AVE.
near Huron
a most unusual selection of jewelry
specializing in
PIERCED EARRINGS OF UNMATCHABLE DESIGN

P T
4 27
3 8
4 14
1 12
3 8
1 1
1 2
16 72

MICHIGAN
TENNESSEE

30 24 54
32 40-72

NOW OPEN

Mon. thru Sat.

10 a.m.-6 p.m.

!!'-
...,

Total fouls: Mich. 18; Tenn. 16.
Attendance-11,300.
B. I Iboard}
The Michigan Women's Swim-
ming Team will participate in
an interstate meet with 23
other schools tomorrow in the
Women's Pool. Diving competi-
tions begins at noon, the finals
are at two, and admission is free.

ENJOY

Zlupfing is to drinking what
smacking one's lips is to
eating.
It's the staccato buzz you
0j make when draining the last fewn
Sdeliciously tangy drops of
r Sprite from the bottle with a
straw.
Zzzzzlllupf I
It's completely uncalled for.
Frowned upon in polite society.
And not appreciated on campus
either.
But. If zlupfing Sprite
is absolutely essential to your
enjoyment; if a good healthy
zlupf is your idea of heaven,
well...all right.
But have ,a heart. With a
drink as noisy as Sprite, a
little zlupf goes a long, long
way.
SPRITE. SO TART AND
TINGLING, WE JUST COULDN'T
lPA 3AAERtE~tS TRAO( MARK KEEP IT QUIET.
STUDENTS
Now's your chance to get the
THE"GREATEST EPIZZA"
at South U. Restaurant
For your convenience-open 24 hours daily
* Carry-out All Week 0 662-4170
Breakfasts-Lunches-Dinners
STEAK AND SHAKE
1313 South University
CHAR-BROILED STRIP STEAK
Salad,┬░Potato, Bread & Butter .........$1.50
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
Salad, Bread & Butter.................$1.30
Old Heid eiber
21 1-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING LOT ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 1 1 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays

pf

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The student
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a junior/senior liberal arts program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree
* THE NEW SCHOOL COLLEGE views general and special-
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meaningful only when it is rooted in a foundation of
liberal arts studies,
* It restores to students full recognition of their indi-
viduality and of their role as the central participant
in the educational process.
* It treats the undergraduate experience not as a sepa-
rate entity, but as one which should be connected to
what is meaningful in the total human experience.
" It regards as the goal of a liberal arts education, not
only.the acquisition of knowledge but, more impor-
tant, the development of those orderly and critical
habits of mind which are fundamental to all intellec-
tual inquiry.
* THE NEW SCHOOL COLLEGE is open to students who
have satisfactorily completed the freshman and
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of The Humanities and The Social Sciences. The
degree is awarded on the basis of student perform-
ance in a comprehensive examination given after two
years of study. Classes are held in the day hours at
The New School's modern Greenwich Village campus.
Applications for Fall 1967 admission are now being
accepted. Interviews can be arranged during the
Christmas recess. Phone ORegon 5-2700, extension 721.
. sAdmissions Off .est
THE NEW SCHOOL COLLEGE

2450 S. State-one mile south of campus. Ph. 662-7307
Open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 'til 9
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FOOD and LIQUOR SERVED

311 South Main

662-4240

III

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II nPFN DlAILY--11 A.M. to 1:3A.M. i

11

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