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November 30, 1966 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-30

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PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVE1WBER 30, 1966

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1066

Versatile

Swim

Squad,

Shows

Depth

'p

T JFASHINGIDE
dds FOR MEN

By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
How can a coach have a more
exasperating problem than too
many good swimmers?
"It's just one of those things,"
sighed Michigan swimming coach
Gus Stager. "We have too -many
butterfliers."
What a problem. First, there is
last year's NCAA winner in the
200 yard fly, and this year's cap-
tain, Carl Robie. Behind him is
Tom O'Malley, Michigan's dark
horse of last year who wound up
second in the NCAA 100 fly.
Supplementing them are two
promising sophomores, Tom Aru-
soo from Montreal and Lee Bis-
bee. Arusoo placed third in the
British Empire Games and Bisbee
copped sixth and seventh in the
AAU's 25 yard championships.
This, earned him a post on the
U.S. team that toured interna-
tionally last summer. Lauded
Stager, "Doing that well as a
freshman just out of high school
is rare-usually they're washed
out in their first competition."
Even Mike 'Conner, another
soph, is a good flier.
But ...
The catch comes in other events,
where depth is rather hypothetical
at present. Paul Scheerer returns
as number one breaststroker in the
country as a result of his NCAA
title, aided in that event by soph-

The medley really should prove have the edge on them in swim-!
a good events for Michigan with ming. In any event it should beE
three of four NCAA winning team close."E
members (O'Malley, Scheerer, and The big question is Kevin Barry,c
Groft) returning. Kingery will re- who dropped out of swimming this
place Orland. summer and might not becoming{
In contrast, the 400 and 800 back this year. If he does come
yard relays could prove the weak- back, there is the possibility as toc
est event. Almost half the Mich- whether he will be as good. Olym-
igan roster is being considered pic champ Barry was bettered
with Robie and Tom Williams the only by Robie in the NCAA 200,
most certain choices in the 800 butterfly.
and Groft and Wiebeck in the 400. Stager sums it up this way: "We'

-Arusoo

and Bisbee in

Scheerer in the breaststroke.King-
ery in the backstroke, Robie for
distance events, and Groft in the
sprints. Besides that we have
O'Malley. Wiebeck, and some
promising sophomores to add
depth to each event."
1967 SWIMMING SCHEDULE
Jan. 7-Big Ten Relays, 1 p.m.
Minneapolis
1:3-Indiana, 7:30 p.m.
Bloomington
14-Purdue, 2:30 p.m.
Lafayette
21-Michigan State, 2 p.m.
East Lansing
28-Openr
Feb. 4-WISCONSIN, 7:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR
11-INDIANA, 2 p.m.
ANN ARBOR

PAUL SCHEERER-NATION'S TOP BREASTSTROKER
omore John Robertson, a distance f pion, will spearhead the sprinters.

swimmer. '
Rus Kingery was the only Mich-
igan backstroker left after Rees
Orland graduated, and Stager in a
desperation move recruited Ken
Wiebeck to give him support. Wei-'
beck, rated second freestyle sprint-
er last year, at first had trouble
readjusting to his high school.
event. But he is improving and
"not only are his times better, but
now he's even coachable," remark-
ed Stager.
The freestyle events, then, arel
left to be populated with an un-
usual number of halfbreeds, due
to the losses of three seniors.
Robie will double as he did last
year and so will Weibeck. O'Mal-
ley followed suit by adding free-
style to his repertory, and stager
is very optimistic about his suc-
cess. O'Conner was also been I
switched from the butterfly, and
Stager is impressed with his times .
for so early in the season.
Bill Groft, twice Big Ten chain-
C .

Tom Lawton, a sophomore should
add ballast to the sprinting events
and seniors Tom Swarten and
Howard also should add depth.
Tickets
Michigan's w i n t e r sports
ticket policy will remain the
same as in past years, accord-
ing to ticket manager Don
Weir. Admission is charged for
all sports except wrestling and
gymnastics. The charge is $1
for students displaying their ID
cards.
Tickets for all basketball
games will go on sale the
Wednesday before the game,
which means that tickets for
next Monday's game against
Houston go on sale today.
Tickets for swimming meets
and hockey games are also
available at the ticket office on
the Wednesday before the
event. Two tickets can be pur-
chased on each ID card.

Practice is being approached
from a very psychological angle'
this year. Swallowing whole the
theoryethat swinining mile after
mile along wavy maize and blue
lane markers broken only by al
flip turn can get tedious, Stager
is trying to very the scenery as;
much as possible. Last year's inter-
val training, consisting of swim-
ming all-out for short distances
with periodic rests in between is
refined to split interval training
which means even shorter dist-
ances with shorter rests in be-
tween. Even workouts have been
staggered, with swimmers coming
on alternate days.
Solid Board
In the diving contingent, Bruce
Brown has graduatedleaving Fred
Brown and Bob Walmsley, a final-
ist in the national AAU champion-
ship last year. The returning;
Brown was All-American on both
boards last year.
Illinois state champion Jay
Meaden, a soph will join his
brother Tom, a senior and Dan
Ritschof rounds out the list of
divers.
With no meets until January,
Stager only has a rough idea of
Michigan's chief competition, but
once again the top contenders will'
likely be Indiana and Michigan
State. Regarding Indiana, Stager
commented, "Their divers are
probably better, but we. probably;
Dodgers Tradec
Davis for Hunt
By The Associated Press

By The Associated Press
1. Notre Dame (40) 9-0-1
2. Michigan St. (10) 9-0-1
3. Alabama (7) 9-0-0
4. Georgia 9-1-0
5. UCLA 9-1-0
6. Nebraska 9-1-0
7. Purdue 8-2-0
8. Georgia Tech 9-1-0
9. Miami, Fla. 7-2-1

505
471
427
336
286
203
194
159
62

have one good man in every event
- -p

33
t

10. Southern Methodist 8-2-0 45

I'

W eore washing out our
a ~scrub denim deportment
3
* '1,2 off3
reg. fleece-lined jackets
$8.50 C.P.O. shirts
NOW hip-length, snap-front jackets
$ L 0 scrub denim jeans
reg. NOW
$8.95 $4.50 pullover Pandora shirts
dd's
TI
"Wh TC & S~leLv. 03
m ' p

18-OHIO STATE, 3:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR
20-MINNESOTA, 7:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR
Mar. 2-3-4-Big Ten Championships
East Lansing
23-24-25-NCAA Championships
East Lansing
Apr. 6-7-8-NAAU Indoor
Championships and Pan Am
Selections-Dallas, Texas

*
0

(Society of Automotive Engineer)
presents
FORD'S INDY ENGINE
technical presentation with slides
and films of Indy and Le Mans
7:30 P.M.... Wed., Nov. 30

Multipurpose Room of UGLI

Everyone Welcome

e.

Have

you been putting off

A blidfold test
for beer.
If anybody ever says you can't
pick Budweiser with your eyes
shut, you can call his bluff.
First, stick your nose close
to the foam of each glass of
beer and take a sniff. Notice a difference?
The one with the clean, fresh aroma is
Budweiser.
Now taste. This gets a bit tricky. But
the one beer that tastes like beer without
any one flavor jumping out at you (like
hops, or an extra sweetness, or some-
times a sour or sharp taste) is Budweiser.
That's because Budweiser is blended-
by our Beechwood Ageing. We want you
to taste the beer, not the recipe.
If anybody pulls a beer-tasting test
on you, now you know how to win. Just
follow your nose.
Budweiser
KING OF BEERS + ANHEUJSER-BUSCH, INC. " ST. LOUIS
NEWARK " LOS ANGELES . TAMPA . HOUSTON

0

FRED BROWN
FACE TOP TEAM

your cycle

REPAIRS?

s
"' ' f

Tests on Tap for Dill, Cagers
By RICK STERN cagers are anxious to get under- ing five would be on the co
Though final exams haven't way "We're ready to play. We against Tennessee as against 1
officially started yet, Craig Dill need to play. There may be times freshmen. This means Den
faces three mighty rugged tests in in these first three games when Bankey and Jim Pitts at 1
the next six days. we don't look too good, but I think guards, Bob Sullivan and Den
Dill is a center and Michigan's that we have to learn from our Stewart at forward and Dill in t
first three opponents of the sea- mistakes," Strack said. middle.
son have among them two of the Match Lights Candles Concerning the role of Stewa
three outstanding post men in the Asked what he thought the who scored 29 in the freshn
country and a third who is per- freshman game of a week ago had game and was voted Sunday o
haps the 'most massive, taught the Wolverines, Strack of the four best sophomores
The former two are Elvin Hayes said "I think that it pinpointed the Big Ten, Strack said "He d(
of Houston and Mike Lewis of our big problem which is to play have the knack of scoring eas
Duke, both of whom are frequently as a team, not just as five roman and we'd like to think that h
mentioned in the same breath as candles." keep it up.'
Lew Alcindor of UCLA. The third, Strack said that the same start- Busy Future
who is the first chronologically, The Wolverines will really
is 7-0, 250-pound Tom Boerwinkle kept on the ball in the next t
of Tennessee. f weeks. After Houston on Mond
Scrutinizing the tests will be they breathe for a day and th
basketball professor Dave Strack, journey to Bowling Green (9
who sends his charges through last year) for a Wednesday nig
their final preseason workout this - encounter. Davidson (21-7) mo
afternoon, before leaving early in for a Saturday afternoon mat
Thursday for balmy Tennessee and Butler (16-10) which lost
and a three day swing through the xtthe Wolverines last year folio
south. on Monday. Exam break leaves t
Dill Will Do schedule free until Dec. 22 wh
"Don't be concerned about Dill," rough Ohio University (13-10) u
said Strack. "I think he's going provide a tuneup for the Los A
to do a fine job. Of course you geles Classic tournament.
can't expect too much of him First opponent in the Clas
either. He doesn't have the physi- r is Georgia Tech (13-13), follow
cal equipment of a Darden or a = ,4 r by either the winner or loser
Buntin. He'll certainly be facing the UCLA-Wisconsin tussle; th
three of the .roughest big men in < Dill may yet get to face th
the country this week; there's no fourth outstanding center.
doubt about that."
Boerwinkle, red-shirted as a SCORES
sophomore, is a fourth year jun- NBA
icr who hails from Independence Detroit 104, Boston 100
Ohio, whom coach Ray Mears feels ELVIN HAYES New York 118, Los Angeles 114
is ready to step into big time com -
petition. Tennessee's deliberate of-
fense though is geared around
football standout Ron Widby who-
averaged 17 points a game lastSKI R ENTA L
season and is picked by many as
the outstanding player in the RENT your skis, wood bindings, garnish
Southeast conference. boots, and poles for the entire ski season
Hayes, no shrimp at 6-8, 235, for only $25. Now thru March 1-limited
is listed on everybody's All- number available. Come in now!
America team. As a sophomore he r
was the 11th leading scorer in the
nation last year, averaging 27.2:
points per game and unless Dill
faces Alcindor in Los Angeles over 2450 S. State-one mile south of campus. Ph. 662-7307
Christmas, Hayes will -be the Open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 'til 9
toughest test of his career. -_
Blue Devil Lewis -_______
Lewis and the Duke Blue Devils,
whom the Wolverines face Satur-
day night on the hostile Durham Aeicau Culure Student's Association
court are rated third or fourth in Ini'l ut ttet' lsett
most preseason polls. As a sopho-I
more last season Lewis averaged
14 points and 10 rebounds a game
on a team that won 26 out of 30 THURSDAY NOON LUNCHEON
games and finished third in the:
NCAA. His .594 shooting percent-'
age was fourth best in the nation. Dr. Robert Skiar
'Thus in their first three games
the Wolverines are up against of the History Dept.
three squads that won 67 games
last season and lost only 18 and
who are all supposed to be strong- : will s.e$ . e on
er this season than last.

The Los Angeles Dodgers traded
two-time batting champion Tom-
my Davis and outfielder-infielder
Derrell Griffith to the New York
Mets yesterday for second base-
man Ron Hunt and outfielder Jim
Hickman in the first major deal
urt of the annual baseball meetings.
the The multi-player transaction
nis was completed soon after Buzzie
the Bavasi, the Dodgers' general man-
nis ager, indicated the National
the League champions were running
into difficulty completing a trade
art, because of the retirement of Sandy
an Koufax and a decision to put
one shortstop Maury Wills in the trade
in 'mart.
oes -~-~--. ---- --
sily SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
e'll DAVE WEIR

Put your cycle back into
GOOD RUNNING ORDER
FOR THE WINTER
Now a t-
NICHOLSON MOTORS
Corner of Ashley & Liberty
662-7407

1 i

....._

Fo

F -

be
wo
day
hen
-15
ght
ves
tch
to
Iws
the
hen
will
n-
sic
Ned
of
hus
hat

OWL

\\

0

Don't you think
student demon
I
" L 4

"--..

we're carrying this
stration a little too far?

ID

.ro-

Floater Boots
/
*--
:T
..dcY .. ap~voa0' fa

Spare Follett's. They've
always given us a good
deal on our used texts.
(
wIJ

0
I

S
0

..
r

Follett's pays you
more cash for
your used books
One of the most pleasant memories you'll have of
your college days is the warm glow you get when
you've sold your used textbooks to Follett's.
There's something about cold cash in a hot little
hand that get's you right here-in the pocket book.
After months of cramming things into your head,/
there's a definite relief in cramming something
into your pocket.
Follett's does this not only because they dearly
love and understand students, but also because
they're in the book business-buying and selling
-in a big way. We need lots of books, and the
best way -to get them is to offer the students more
money for them. We recondition used texts, but
if you want the most for your books, keep them
in:. frn~tn

S;dlllahn t lilLs' assuref(2voltX dal'21tliand (dry!
IIC s s 1 a i l a ll y w e a t h eu r .1 7 9

Our book
bargains are a
real blast, too.

9

.AdikL
.ez-ml

II1

.11

I

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