100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 30, 1966 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGESIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 186!

Swimmers,

Wrestlers

Place

Second

in

Big

Ten

Tankers Take Third in NCAA

Mat Win Streak Broken at 34 *

By STEVE FICK They played in their own sha-1
Like a diamond in a garbage dows, too: the shadows of a re-
dump, a good team at a school cord of continued excellence un-1
unused to winning ways will catch der the guidance of Coach Gus
the eye of even a casual observer. Stager. During Stager's 12 years
Put that same sparkler on dis- at Michigan, three of his squads
play against a background of oth- have taken conference titles, four
er gems or top-notch teams, and have won NCAA crowns, and none
it becomes a little harder to see, has finished below second in the
a bit tougher to spot . though Big Ten meet.
it may not shine the less. And so, like the Boston Celtics,
This is the way it seems to be Perry Mason, and the old Gotham
with Michigan's swimmers, who Bombers, Michigan's swimmers
were good enough to cop third have come to know a little of the
place in this year's NCAA champ- strange vulnerability that attach-
ionships, but who toiled all season es to being a perennial winner: if
long in the shadows of a game you win, so what?-you were sup-
called basketball and a man called posed to; but if you lose-now,
Cazzie Lee Russell. that's something to talk about.
Make WA HR'S your
headquarters
for all your textbook
and college supplies
SERVING U OF M STUDENTS SINCE 1883

But before they lost a regular
meet last winter, the Wolverine
tankers claimed victory in what
was probably the most exciting
and closely-fought match in their
history-a down-to-the-wire, 62-
61 win over defending Big Ten
champ Indiana.
The win, a come-from-behind
effort in a seesaw battle, was bag-
ged at the end when Bill Groft,
Ken Wiebeck, Bob Hoag. and Rich
Walls whipped the Hoosier entry-
in the last event of the day, the
400-yard freestyle relay. The
points for their win were just
enough to upset what had been
a three-point Indiana bulge and
give the Wolverines the nod.
Significant Victory
The victory, which Coach Sta-
ger attributed to team effort -
"they didn't punk out, they stayed
in there giving their best" - was
especially satisfying because it
marked the second time in as
many years that the Wolverine
tankers had bested the Hoosiers
in a head-to-head encounter. No
other team has defeated Indiana
(the 1965 and '66 NCAA runner-
up) in a dual meet in any of the
last six years.

By CLARK NORTON
Winston Churchill once warned
that 'without victory there is no
survival." Particularly when you're
fighting Germans with pitchforks.
But blood, toil, tears, and sweat
also come in handy when you're
building a Big Ten wrestling dual
meet winning streak, and, of
course, victory is essential-time
after time-for that string to sur-
vive.
The 1966 edition of the Michi-
gan wrestling squad did battle
successfully the ultimatum of vic-
tory facing them in the season's
first three dual meets, to run
their winning skein to 34 over a
period of four years, but succumb-
CARL ROBIE churns the water ed to the Inevitable Loss in their
ith which he set a world record fourth match when they bowed to
d won a silver medal in the 1964 the invading Minnesota grapplers
by an 18-8 margin. End of suc-
cess story?
for the Wolverines in dual meets Matmen Start New String
and came as no surprise, since Not to the Wolverine matmen,
only three men had graduated who promptly proceeded to dis-
from their third-place NCAA pose of their last four Big Ten

WOLVERINE SWIM CAPTAIN{
with his unique butterfly style w
for 200 meters when he was 16 an
Olympics.
Michigan's natators opened
their season January 8 with a
79-40 win over Wisconsin. Diver
Bruce Brown took both the one-
and three-meter diving events for
the Wolverines as sophomore Wie-
beck and letternien Groft, Walls,
Russ Kingery, 1967 captain Carl
Robie, Paul Scheerer and Bill Far-
ley added firsts in other events.
The victory was the ninth straight

BOB FEHRS

00,

Il

\4

sR

Traditionally
for, Fall ..
Redwond & nu; ,presents its Fall 1966 collectfon of natural
shoulder clothing and related furnishings. Authentic traditional
styles that take you anywhere in classic comfort, dignity, and
good taste.

Al

squad of 1965.
Hoosiers Dunk 'M'
The next day, Indiana tumbled
the Maize and Blue by a 176.5-
153.5 margin in the Big Ten re-
lays, capturing six firsts to the
Wolverine's three in the eight-
team meet. The loss was a dis-
appointment for the Wolverines-
the year before they had captured
eight of eleven firsts enroute to
downing second-place Indiana
104-76-but memories of it were
washed away when they churned
their path to the 62-61 victory
over Indiana the following week-
end.
Then the tankers kicked their
way to victories over Michigan
State (70-53), Purdue in a dual
meet (94-29) and Michigan State
and Ohio State in a triangular
(209-159-104) on the same day,
and Minnesota (90-33), in quick
succession.
Indiana Again
On February 12, the Wolverines
carted a 15-meet win streak to
Bloomington only to have it upset
66-57 by Indiana, which had trail-
ed 33-24 at one point but finished
strong.
Victories by Olympians Robie
and Farley in the 400-yard indi-
vidual medley and 1000-yard free-
style, Groft in the 50-yard free-
style, and two relay squads were
not enough to insure a Michigan
win. Indiana's Bill Utley grabbed
firsts in both the 100- and 200-
yard freestyle, events the Wolver-
ines had hoped to win, and Robie
was awarded second in the 500-
yard freestyle though finishing in
the same time as Hoosier Bob
(Continued on Page 11)

opponents and two non-confer-
ence foes as well, copped a second
place finish in the Big Ten tdur-
nament (which solely determines
Big Ten standings), and then
grabbed fifth place in the NCAA
championships.
Nor to Cliff Keen, Wolverine
wrestling coach, who managed to
be philosophical about his team's
lone setback in a 9-1 season, which
included a third place finish in
the Midlands tournament in La
Grange, Illinois, to open the year.
"Well," he explained, "the win-
ning streak actually represented
34 separate victories, each accom-
plished in its own fashion by a
number of different athletes. Its
main significance is that we did
win those 34 different matches,
each in their own right.
'While it was something I think

all the boys can be proud of there,
was no pressure on us to continue
the winning streak for its own
sake-rather we wanted to win
every match for its individual im-
portance."
Keen had felt from the begin-
ning of the season that the 1966
squad was one of great potential,
but remained cautious throughout
the winter when issuing predic-
tions for an outstanding season.
"The team is still unproven," the
coach asserted after the early
matches, in which the wrestlersj
gained decisive victories over Big
Ten opponents Iowa, Indiana and
Illinois. "We don't know quite
what to expect pet, since many of
the boys are still inexperienced."
Four Regulars Returned
In fact, at the beginning of the
season, only four of the eight,
weight classes used in Big Ten
competition were occupied by in-
cumbents. The other four, it ap-
peared, would have to be filled'
mainly by sophomores or upper-
classmen who have seen little pre-
vious action.
Yet at the end of the year, the
Wolverines had capped a "very
good season," according to Keen,
by a national champion, a run-
ner-up, a third, a fourth, and a
sixth place finisher in the NCAA
tournament, in addition to the
second place Big Ten team finish.
"Of course we're never really sat-
isfied unless we win the confer-
ence championship" (Michigan
had won the title the previous
three years), related the coach,
"but overall the boys did an ex-
cellent job."
Defeat Spurs Grapplers On.
The team seemed to reach its
peak immediately after the Min-
nesota defeat. After whitewash-
ing their next two opponents, Pur-
due and Illinois, the grapplers al-
so manhandled Pittsburgh and
Wisconsin before closing out the

regular season by shutting out To-
ledo and squeaking by arch-rival
Michigan State, in a contest that
wasn't decided until the final
match.
Ironically, Michigan State went A
on to capture the Big Ten tourna-
ment and the conference champ-
ionship by a scant four points ov-
er the Wolverines. while Minne-
sota, Michigan's lone nemesis dur-
ing the regular season, had to
settle for third.
Fehrs, Johannsen Lead 'Wolves' 4
The matmen were led through-
out the season by this year's cap-
tain Bob Fehrs, 123 pound run-
nerup in the NCAA finals; gradu-
ated captain Bill Johannesen,
who captured fourth place in the
137 pound division at the nation-
al championships; Cal Jenkins, $
who grabbed second place in the
Big Ten at 145 pounds; and Dave
Porter, NCAA and Big Ten heavy-
weight champion.
Other regulars in the Wolverine
line-up were Dave Dozeman, 130
pound senior who sat out the pre-
vious season with an injury suf- 4
fered in an automobile accident;
Burt Merical, who filled in for
injured Jim Kamman most of the
year (Kamman recovered in time
to take third place in the NCAA's
at 157 pounds); sophomores Way-
ne Hansen and Bill Waterman,
who alternated at 167 pounds;4
and Wayne Wentz, stalwart in the
177 pound class.
Two Top Stars
Fehrs met defeat but once be-
fore his second loss in two years
in the finals of the NCAA tourna-
ment-that in the Midlands tour-
ney, in which he dropped a close A
decision to Massaki Hatta, Olym-
pic world champion.
Porter was perhaps the biggest
surprise of the year. The sopho-
more muscleman from Lansing,
affectionately nick-named Baby
Huey by his friends, and rumored
to do such things as pull-ups by
making the bar come to him,
dropped only one decision all year.
Porter lost to Joe James, a former
national champion, in the Mid-
lands, but from then on was un-
stoppable.
Three Replacements Needed
But while Fehrs, Porter, Kam-
man, Hansen, Waterman, and
Wentz are all returning to form a
strong nucleus for this year's
squad, coach Keen faces the pros-
pect of finding new regulars in
three weight classes; 130, 137, and
145-Dozeman, Johannesen, and
Jenkins having graduated. Veter-
ans Gordon Weeks and Merical
have good shots at two of the
spots, but at least one position will
apparently have to be filled by a
(Continued on page 11)

SUITS
edwood & Ross suits are cut along
natural lines, narrow lapels, center
hooked vent with plain front trousers.
A complete variety awaits your inspection,
including Cheviots, Coverts, Worsteds, and
Sharkskins-many with vest .. .
from 59.50 to 100.00
SPORT COATS
istinctive separate jackets, fine im-
ported and domestic woolens. Cut
along natural body lines for correct
appearance. Tasteful colorings, individual
patterns in new midweight fabrics for mod-
ern comfort . . . from 29.95 to 65.00

DAVE PORTER

____ ____ ______________________________________________ I

1,j~
N
,tg4
JMM

Student Headquarters
for
MICHIGAN CAMPUS WEAR
SWEAT SHIRTS
(including special orders for fraternities,
sororities, dorms and clubs)
JACKETS

'M' BLANKETS
FOR SMALL FRY-Sweat shirts, Suits, Sweaters

STOP IN-See for yourself at the Briar Shop!
Convenient Charge Accounts available.

WOMEN'S GYM ATTIRE

SJ weater imports

L

SHORTS
BLOUSES

SHOES
ARROWS

BADMINTON BIRDS
SWIM APPAREL

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS' UNIFORMS
ALL GOLF and TENNIS SUPPLIES FIELD HOCKEY SHOES

the Classic Look from England

10 our distinctive sweater collection
features McGeorge and Cox
Moore fine lamb's wool and Scot-
tish shetlands in new heather tones. Hand
framed and fully fashioned.
V-necks & Crews 15.95
Cardigans 19.95

n F
o.

M14%$P
1
5, ao'J

MEN'S ATHLETIC SUPPLIES
SHORTS, REVERSIBLE T-SHIRTS, WARM-UP SUITS
SHOES for ALL SPORTS, EXERCISERS, PADDLE BALL PADDLES
HAND BALL GLOVES, SQUASH RACKETS, TEAM UNIFORMS
Complete Line of TENNIS and GOLF SUPPLIES

14*

FENCING EQUIPMENT

ISO-KITS

WINTER SPORTS FUN

SKI JACKETS and PARKAS
SWISS SKI SWEATERS

STRETCH SKI PANTS

SKIS and BINDINGS

SWISS SKI BOOTS

,.---.
r " '

ewoo& ftoss

ICE SKATES-MEN and WOMEN'S

SKI RENTALS

When YOU think of FUN-

4

in

I

r

tIII

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan