100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER. 6, 1966

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6,1966

Long-winded

Illini

Backs

Outdistance

Wolverines

(Continued from Page 1)
called time out, and when the
Blue lined up again, it was in 'I'
formation.
Vidmer took the snap and )itch-
ed back to Jim Detwiler, who was
playing the deep part of the I'-
and with a block from Ward-who
b}
A professor of
classical Greek
Kept searching for
objects unique.
They caused him to snicker
Except Colt Malt Liquor-
So he sat down and
drank his critique!
' 1AT.ON" A
A completely
unique experience!
*SPECIAL PRODUCTS DIVISION
THE NATIONAL BREWING CO., BALT., MD.

lined up directly in front of him,
Detwiler carried the ball just
across the goal line. Rick Sygar
converted to tie the score which
remained 7-7 at halftime.
Opted for Option
Early in the second half Illinois
took over on its own 10-yard line,
and Huston broke loose on a 66-
yard sprint to the Michigan 24.
One play later, the shifty Naponic
rolled right on the option and
sprinted through a wide hole un-
touched for the second Illinois
score.
Vidmer, after the following
kickoff, led a 58-yard drive with
Ward and Clancy again gaining
most of the yardage. In the drive
Vidmer hit Clancy with passes of
10, eight, 14, and, 16 yards-the
last play going for the touchdown.
Sygar's conversion tied the score
at 14-14.
Sygar Scores Again
With about two minutes left in
the third period, Illinois was
forced to punt from its 34. Sygar
received the punt and with a good
blocking setup in front of him, he
cut to the right sideline and
pranced 64 yards for a touchdown.
His conversion put the Wolverines
in front 21-14, but Illinois' two
long runbacks just minutes later
sort of took the glory away.
Michigan got possession of the
football three times after Sulli-
van's interception return, but
twice lost it on interceptions and
once on a punt. There was one last
instance of hope for the Wolver-
ines when-with just less than
two minutes remaining in the
game - Naponic fumbled and

Roger Rosema recovered for Mich-
igan on the Blue 49. Rosema
had three Wolverine blockers in
front of him, and only Naponic
had a chance for him from be-
hind.
Naponic to the Rescue
The sophomore signal caller
came through again, though, and
dropped Rosema along with Mich-
igan's signal hopes. "I just held
on for dear life," Naponic said
after the game.

Illinois' locker room was jubi-1
lantly noisy. Pete Elliott s'ood
amidst a semi-circle of reporcers
answering the post-game ques-
tiions, happy but still a little nerv-
ous, lighting up one Camel after
another. "Michigan played a good
game," he conceded, "But I think
we played better. We played our
best."
As usual, one reporter was morel
interested in the "Battle of the
Brothers" than the game. Elliott

Going the Wrong Way ...
On a One-Way Street.. .

stifled him. "We don't relish play-
in each other," he said.
What Rivalry?!?
"But it's nice to win once in a
while, isn't it?" He persisted.
"I'm just glad for our team that
we won," Elliott finalized, em-
phasizing "team."
No one complained about the
weather conditions. And despite
the snow and cold, individual per-
forformances were sharp.
Up and Away
Clancy added 11 receptions to
his nation-leading figure, good for
179 yards. Ward, breaking away
with speed, power, and determina-
tion all afternoon, netted 131
yards in 20 carries. And defen-
sively, linebacker Frank Nunley
made some bruising tackles on Il-
linois' ball carriers.
But nothing can be taken away
from Naponic. He mixed his plays
well, his fakes were effective, and
his passing was accurate. The fact
that Illinois' ground game more
than doubled Michigan's must be
credited mainly to this sophomore
quarterback.
"I was really proud of the way
my boys came back after losing to
Purdue last week," Coach Pete
summed up. "It was a hard thing
to do."

0

First Downs
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
Total No. of Rushes
Net Yards--
Rushing
Passing
Forward Passes Att.
Completed
Intercepted by
Yards interceptions
returned
Total Plays (Rushes
and Passes)
Punts, Number
Average distance
Kickoffs, returned by
Yards Kicks Returned
Punts
Kickoffs
Fumbles, Number
Ball lost by
Penalties,Number
Yards penalized
MICHIGAN 0 7
ILLINOIS 0 7

MICH. ILL.
14 13
5 11
8 2
1 0
38 53
114 246
183 41
27 9
13 5
0 3
0 103
65 62
7 7
37 32
5 4
106 140
74 57
32 83
2 .3
1 2
3 4
15 39
14 0 - 21
7 14 - 28

Michigan - Clancy (16 pass), Sygar
(kick).
Michigan - Sygar (65 punt return),
Sygar (kick)
Illinois - Naponic (20 run), Stotz
(kick)
Illinois-Sullivan (98 pass int), Hus-'
ton (pass from Naponic).

SCORING
Illinois-Naponic (1 run), J. Stotz
(kick)
Michigan - Detwiler (6 run), Sygar
(kick)
Illinois-M. Smith (40 punt return),
PAT (no good)

Player
Vidmer
Ward
Detwiler
Fisher
Totals
Player
Huston
Johnson
Harford
Naponic
Brooks
Bess
Totals
Vidmer
Naponic
Ward
Clancy
Humphri
Totals
Johnson
Wright
Huston
Totals
Kemp
F. Smith
Miller
Totals

RUSHING
Michigan
Tries LossN
7 49 -
20 51
9 0
3 3
37 571
Illinois
Tries Loss N
16 0 1
11 0
4 0
17 14
4 4
1 0
53 182
PASSING
Michigan
Att. Comp. Y
27 131
Illinois
Att. Comp. Y
9 5
PASS RECEIVING
Michigan
No. Y
1 <
11 17
es 1 1
13 1
Illinois
No. Yd
1
3 2
1 1
5 4

Net
-40
131
26
-3
114
Net
105
60
11
50
16
4
246

Ave.
-5.8
6.5
2.9
-1.0
3.0
Ave.
6.7
5.5
2.7
2.9
4.0
4.0
4.6

-Daily--Lanny Austin
BRUCE SULLIVAN coughs up the ball midway in the second quarter on a kickoff return as Gerry
Miklos brings him down. Rick Sygar moves toward the fumble which John Rowser eventually re-
covered on the Illinois 46.

14

NATIONAL FOOTBALL:

Yds. Pct.
183 .482
Yds. Pct.
41 .555

Washington Upends UCLA,

16-3

Ave

WE NUMBER ONE .. .
BUT WE STILL TRY HARDER
Come to the third organizational meeting
Student Council for Exceptional Children
Tuesday, November 8

ds.
4
.79
0
83
ds.
4
23
14
41
.rs.
56
'rs.
69
225

Ave.
4.0
16.3
0.0
14.1
Ave.
4.0
7.7
14.0
8.2
Ave.
37
Ave.
28
34
32

By The Associated Press
SEATTLE-Washington, spark-'
ed by Frank Smith's touchdown
interception and Jim Sartoris' 80-
yard kick-off return, upset third-
ranked UCLA 16-3 yesterday be-
fore 56,300 howling fans in dark,
rainswept Husky Stadium.
Washington went ahead on Don
Martin's 42-yard field goal only
four minutes into the game. Kurt
Zimmerman tied it up for the
Bruins with a 36-yard field goal
six minutes later.
Sartoris then did his heroics,
taking Zimmerman's kickoff on
his own seven-yard line, starting
up the middle where he found
daylight to the right at midfield

University Elementary School
Dr. Bates will speak

PUNTING
Michigan
No.
7
Illinois
No.
2
7

YI
2
Yr
1
22

Lunchroom

and was on his way until Mark
Gustafson caught him at the 13.
Six plays later, fullback Jeff
Jordan banged over left guard for
the touchdown and Martin's kick
made it 10-3.
Washington scored again mid-
way through the third period when
Smith picked off Gary Beban's
pass at the UCLA 29-yard line and
romped in for the touchdown.
Irish Maul Pitt
SOUTH BEND-Nick Eddy's 85-
yard kickoff return and Tom
Schoen's 63-yard return for third
quarter touchodowns enabled top-
ranked Notre Dame to subdue
Pittsburgh 40-0 yesterday.
The win was the seven straight
for the Irish.
Pitt's upset-inspired Panthers
held Notre Dame scoreless for the
first 25 minutes of the game. But
as the first half neared a close,
quarterback Terry Hanratty whip-
ped into the end zone on a three-
yard sweep to cap an 80-yard drive
and send Notre Dame ahead.
Then, in the third period, the
tide really turned against Pitt-
which has beaten only West Vir-
ginia in seven previous starts.

'Bama Routs LSU
BIRMINGHAM - Bobby Johns
cracked a defensive duel by scor-
ing on a 33-yard sprint with an
intercepted pass yesterday, carry-
ing Alabama to a 21-0 conquest
of Louisiana State which kept the
Crimson T i d e 's national and
Southeastern Conference t i t1 e
hopes alive.
Alabama had forged an 8-0
margin in the first half on a
safety and two field goals by Steve
Davis, but the Tide was not able
to score a touchdown until Johns
picked off Fred Haynes' pass and
swept into the end zone with two
minutes left in the third period.
A pass interception by Stan
Moss with four minutes left in the+
game nailed down the triumph for
the Tide.
* * *
Bulldogs Growl
JACKSONVILLE-Georgia's de-
fensive unit harrassed Steve Spur-+
rier all afternoon yesterday as the
Bulldogs handed the seventh-
ranked Florida Gators their first
loss of the season 27-10.
Trailing 10-3 at the half, Geor-
gia scored four times after the
intermission to blow the game

:

Attendance-59,322

]Fight
textbook
squint.
Get aTensor@ high-intensity lamp.

open before a Gator Bowl crowd of
62,820.
Lynn Hughes, 39-yard touch-
down interception early in the
fourth quarter put Georgia ahead.
Hughes' touchdown came after
Ronnie Jenkins plunged over from
four yards out to tie the score at
10-all in the third quarter.
Florida seldom had the ball in
the last period.
Arkansas Rolls
LITTLE ROCK - Linebacker
David Cooper's 37-yard run with
an intercepted pass gave eighth-
ranked Arkansas the cussion it
needed to slip past Rice 31-20
yesterday in a Southwest Confer-
ence football game.
Cooper's score came with 7:31
remaining shortly after quarter-
back Jon Brittenum had engineer-
ed the Razorbacks 69 yards to
erase a 20-17 Rice advantage, The
Razorbacks' go-ahead touchdown
came on sophomore tailback David
Dickey's two-yard plunge off tack-
le, his second score of the game.
The victory was Arkansas' fifth
in five conference games and set
up next Saturday's showdown
w i t h league-leading Southern
Methodist.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
JCHN SUTKUS
WELCOME!!
MON. thru SAT.
8:30 to 5:30 P.M.
DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

IW
w

YOUR
FAVORITE
BOOKSTORE
IS ALWAYS THE
BEST PLACE TO BUY FOR
SERVICE AND DEPENDABILITY.
Ulrich's Books Inc.
Wahr's University Book Store

where
YOU be
in as good a spot an original contribu-
as you are today? tion to your area of
Well.informed? Rt.J w interest. In an
Up on things? environment like
Intimately this, there's no
acquainted with the telling how far

Want a clean, white, bright light? Want to see words etched
on the page sharp and clear? Want to come away from those
heavy assignments without squinting and eyestrain? Want a lamp
that gets in close without getting in your way? Want to burn
the midnight oil without burning up your roommate? Want a
concentrated light that lets you concentrate?
Then what you need is a Tensor high-intensity lamp. What
do you mean you can't afford our $12.95 or $14.95 or $17.50
or $19.95 prices? Didn't you know you can get aTensor for $9.95?
So stop squinting. Get a Tensor high-intensity lamp. And
who knows,,your grades might even get a little better this term.
"tstensor
Sx._tiIt helps you see better's

state of the art in your field
of study?;

It

52 weeks for only $4.50

Or will you (through no fault
of your own) be dangerously
close to the brink of
obsolescence?
Could happen. Often does.
Which is one good reason to
consider a career at MITRE.
MITRE is pioneering in the
design and engineering of
complex information, sensor,
command, control and com-
munications systems for the
United States Government.
Our assignments include such
prominent electronic systems
as the NORAD Combat
Operations Center, the Back-
up Interceptor Command
System for SAGE, and the
National Military Command
System (NMCS).
These projects represent the
most important systems
challenges of our time, and
require the most advanced
thinking on a broad range of
scientific problems and the
technologies needed to
solve them.
As a member of the MITRE
team, you'll be working in an
atmosphere of scientific
inquiry, alongside colleagues
of outstanding reputation,
with the opportunity to make

you can go. But this much is
certain. You'll not be over-
looked, and you can't be
overtaken.
Salary? Benefits? They're
competitive, of course. More-
over, we have an excellent
Educational Assistance and
Staff Scholar Program.
(Many MITRE employees
presently attend nearby
educational institutions includ-
ing Harvard, Boston University,
Boston College, Brandeis,
Northeastern, MIT, and Tufts.)
Depending on your interests,
qualifications and current
openingsyou may start in one
of the following, or other,
departments:
System Planning and
Engineering
Air and Missile
Defense Systems
System Design
Systems Analysis
Air Traffic Systems
Tactical Systems
Strategic Systems
Range Instrumentation
Information Sciences
Computer & Display
Technology
Communications
Electronic Warfare
Radar Design
and Technology
Information Processing
Surveillance and
Warning Systems
Applied Mathematics

DID YOU MISS THESE
NEWSWEEK STORIES???
BRITAIN'S WITH-IT SOCIETY. Are
they "switched-on" or just "a
coffin of tarted-up people"? THE
DRAFT, 1966. Who's going, what
they face, how they feel about it.
LSD AND THE MIND DRUGS. A trip
with the acid heads and an ap-
praisal of the perils. POP... IT'S
WHAT'S HAPPENING. "The great-
est pop-art object in the world is
the planet Earth." WHAT ROLE
FOR THE EDUCATED WOMAN? "Sex

I

prejudice is the only prejudice
now considered socially accept-
able." THE LITTLE MAGAZINES OF
THE NEW LEFT. Youth, militancy,
energy and naivete provide the
bounce. BLACK POWER. How deep
the split in the civil rights move-
ment? AUTO RACING. The Year of
the Ford. VIETNAM. The polls and
the war. SCIENCE. Shattering the
antimatter mirror.
On and on it goes, week after
week-page after page of reward-
ing reading like this. Start enjoy-
ing it now.

* The Paulist Father is a modern
man in every sense of the word. He
is a man of this age, cognizant of
the needs of modern men. He is
free from stifling formalism, is a
pioneer in using contemporary
ways to work with, for and among
100 million non-Catholic Amer-
icans. He is a missionary to his own
people-the American people. He
utilizes modern techniques to ful-
fill his mission, is encouraged to
call upon his own innate talents to
help further his dedicated goal.
" If the vital spark of serving God
through man has been ignited in
you, why not pursue an investiga-
tion of your life as a priest? The
Paulist Fathers have developed an
aptitude test for the modern man
interested in devoting his life to
God. This can be a vital instrument
tn hln nyo make the most impor-

4

4

* Special Offer for Students Only: Newsweek, 6SA21
117 East Third Street,*
f6 5 a Dayton,Ohio45402 *
152 weeks for ony y$4.50 I want Newsweek to keep *
r me in the know for the next
52 weeks for $4.50 with the
tind rktndia tat n,

Technical representa- T H rE-r

>:<:

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan