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August 30, 1966 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN D,% 1 Ll

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966

PAGE EGHT T~E MIC~GAN DA. .TUEDAY..AGUST.3.....

,

I

Animated

University

Professors

O

Counteract Machine-like Standard
Freshmen will soon-if they for students and their disgust with and offering only a rehashing of Prof. Michael Benamou of the
haven't already-become familiar the Viet Nam war and foreign textbook material. French department, although he
with one of the most salient and policy. One of the 39 arrested last It would be appropriate at this teaches only graduate courses, has
overworked complaints about the point to also cite the creative ap- involved himself with undergrad-
large, impersonal University-that fall for sitting-in at the Ann po o sc eate uates' interests as a member of
Iproach of psychology departmentuae'itrsssammbro
undergraduates rarely or never Arbor draft board, he conceived teaching fellows, some of whom the faculty planning committee for
see the distinguished faculty this the idea for the new course he 4 have reorganized the traditional the Residential College. Benamou
institution prides itself on but offered last winter called "Social recitation set-up to provide tu- has worked as coordinator of the
allows to be buried with research Analysis of Revolution" while in torials or smaller, seminar-type intensive language program for
or publication deadlines. jail, according to his fellow sit- classes for students who have de- the Peace Corps.
The complaint is legitimate to inners. sired them. John J. Manning Jr., an English,
a certain extent, but. there are The course is one of the few Prof. Marvin Felhein of the instructor working for a PhD. Ain
some notably refreshing excep- which roquired no examinations. English department has involved 16th century historiography and
tions, rarely recognized by those himself with extracurricular ac- literature offers a sympathetic
who revel in attacking "machine- campus groups on the topic of tivities of undergraduates as well .ear as administrative assistant in
like, diluted educational stan- revolution, conducting a series of as demonstrated a -deep concern the junior-senior counseling office
dards." lectures on that subject during for their academic lives. He has and a cogent voice for student ac-
Perhaps the most prominent of winter semester at Guild House, acted as an advisor for the Honors tivism. He has often spoken ap-
Perapsthemos prmientof witersemstr a Guld ous, literary publication, Offset, and provingly and appealingly for
these exceptions is Prof. Anatol headquarters for the Ecumenical Itearyamuberoath, Reeo-n d entsgyand appeaingaymin-
Rapoport of the psychology de- Campus Ministry, was a member of the Reed Coin- students taking a role in admin-
prtote psychlogyhe-ampusMinimittee, which in the early 1960's istrative decision making.
partment, senior research mathe- Prof. Richard Mann of the psy- outlined suggestions for liberaliz- English protessor Donald Hall,
matician at the Mental Health Re- chology department has demon- ing Office of Student Affairs' poet-in-residence and poetry edi-
serhIsiue ehsapidstrated his interest in under- policy. ,
observations of his widely recog- tor of Harper's Magazine, current-
nized research on "game theory" graduate education by working While speaking frequently on his ly has his production of "An
to international politics but does with a group of teaching fellows Ispecial interests in literature, he Evening's Frost," on a former
not ensconce himself within the on a restructuring of psychology also addresses students on aca- famed poet-in-residence, touring
conine ofhi~schlary wrk. 101 and the institution of a pro- demic policy and their role in tento.I h otrcn
gram offering beginning students helping make it. He early express- ceativeiarts festial, he acted in
One of the organizers of the a chance to participate in field ed his opposition to plans for a a production of one of Alfred
1965 teach-in and last spring's work. "Project Outreach," as it is residential college. Jarry's rarely seen "Ubu" plays.
China conferencesRapoport fre- called,involves students in work Felheim has expressed his good Hall has been sometimes piqued
quently addresses student gather- at such places as Northville Men- opinionaofblectur-stylemclassesd
ings, especially those sponsored by tal Hospital, an experimental ele- constant point of student criticism, at the Daily's "distorted" concept
Voice political party. mentary school called "Children s He obviously has a valid point, at of "culture," and took pains es-
gAdothe familarfgure tun- Community School," a boy's train- least a f a his own es pecially to express his dissatis
Anth famiia nnur tlo u-heatas arachswnletue
dergraduates, philosophy Profes- ing school and institutes for so- are concerned. His Shakespeare faction with an editorial criticiz-
cnr 7Wrf-hinfR~r-nn hascially maladjusted children. class is alwa s full if no ing the building of a new theatre
Att Aver- ing the .undingIA.fAaAnew theatre

k4

A

Professor Frithjof Bergmann, philosophy department

Professor Alexander Eckstein, economics department

'American Association of Professors:
Aims at reserving Academic Freedom

5Or r ijoi tergmaiu , V ta
played an active role in teach-ins The program was instituted with
and has spoken at Voice rallies, the desire to permit students to
His undergrad-level courses in apply "textbook principles" to ac-
"Philosophy and Literature" and tual situations. Accompanying the
"Contemporary Continental Phi- "Outreach" idea was an elimina-
losophers" are consistently closed tion of the massive psychology 101
early during preregistration. lectures given in Hill Aud., often
A popular young sociology pro- attacked previously, along with
fessor, Thomas Mayer, has assum- other large-scale lectures, for
ed an even more intimate concern creating a feeling of anonymity

crowded, even though one of the
sections meets on Saturdays.
Felheim has said that he pur-
posely asks to teach Saturday
classes, because he knows that
students who sign up for his
course do so because they are
interested in having him for a
teacher, not merely in finding a
convenient hour to take a required
subject. And, Felheim's students
do seem to intensely appreciate
his teaching. Early last fall when
Felheim became ill, their dis-
appointment was obvious when
attendance, previously near per-
fect, dwindled for substitute
lecturers.

at the expense of more urgently
needed student facilities, But the
quibbling that ensued was not
really surprising; the Daily and
any defenders of "art, beauty,
esthetics" never have been the
best of friends.{
A professor who should be of{
particular interest to students
fearing a revocation of the II-SI
deferment is Ross Wilhelm of theI
business school. In an issue of thej
Nation last fall, Wilhelm outlined
a proposal for increasing salariesE
for the armed forces, putting them
on a voluntary basis and thus
eliminating the necessity for the
draft.

Welcome To Michi an
When you selected MICHIGAN you
chose the best
NOW
Select your BOOK STORE with the same care---
Ask any upperclassman and you too will become
an ULRICH'S customer-
DEPENDABLE
COURTEOUS
Since 1929 FRIENDLY

By BETSY TURNER
The American Association of
University Professors, a local as
well as national organization, de-
fines its main purpose as the pre-
servation of academic freedom.
By using the term "academic
freedom" AAUP implies that each
professor at a given institution has
the right to express his views on
any subject without the fear of re-
prisal.
Infringements on this freedom
of speech and deterrents which are
presented to the professors to keep
ii in Irom ex rcismng uii. r free-
dom are the main concerns of the
national chapter.
Professors from colleges and
universities across the country
compose this national organiza-
tion. "About 7 to 8 hundred pro-
fessors who teach at the Univer-
sity are members of the national
chapter," commented George Hay,
chairman of the math department
and president of the local chapter
of AAUP.
Tne AAUP has no legal powers
but it does wield a lot of political
pressure in the form of censure. If
a member of the organization feels
that his rights have been violated
by the college or university at
which he is teaching he may con-

tact the national AAUP organiza-
tion. It then sends a representa-
tive group to investigate the situ-
ation. The investigation involves
interviewing and questioning both
officials of the particular univer-
sity administration and faculty
members.
If the investigators consider the
complaint justified they will in-
form the university or college in
cue. -Lon of the digcovertd vajid-
ity. If the committee receives no
positive response to its findings,
the institution which has been in-
vestigated is placed on the AAUP
censure list.
AAUP members are advised not
to accept positions offered to them
by the listed institutions until they
h: a cqrrecu d 1he cnditions
which led to censure.
The University was placed on
the AAUP censure list from 1955-
1959 because the AAUP felt that
Sm" o ith R genu v-lows vio-
lated the rights of faculty mem-
bers
The AAUP also makes state-
ments and takes stands on issues
which concern the academic world.
At the natnional convention held
on April 29 and 30 of this year, in
Atlanta, Georgia, the decision was
made not to endorse the strike ac-

to use.
The local chapter of AAUP is
concerned mainly with giving its
members and other interested in-
dividuals a chance to discuss issues
which effect the field of teaching
and academic freedom.
The question of the teaching fel-
low's role in 'the University has
been of great interest to the local
AAUP chapter: At one of their re-
cent meetings, teaching fellows
were invited to present their side
of the issue.
The purpose of the AAUP meet-
ing is to make available the oppor-
tunity for open forum where ideas
and points of view can be discuss-
id he formation of a definite
statement on agiven issue is not
a part of the goal. Such was the
case on the teaching fellow issue.
The professors generally held
the viewpoint that teaching fellows
were not part of the faculty but
were students. Further, the money
which they receive is not a salary
but rather a fellowship, a type of,
grant. "The teaching fellows are

tion taken by the faculty of St. learning a profession which they
John's College in New York. Al- hope to practice the rest of their
though the AAUP recognized the lives. If the salaries are increased
faculty grievances as valid, they
felt that striking was not a suit- as substantially as the group de-
able protest method for teachers mands, the professors' salaries

A4

would have to be cut. This would
defeat the entire purpose of the
graduate program which caters to
the teaching fellow. Professors
would leave and the level of excel-
lency would certainly decline,"
Hay commented.
Another issue concerning AAUP
.s wilen and 'where the university
professor should, ethically speak-
ing, present his personal political
views to his students. The question
of participation in teach-ins and
formation of classroom discussions
on politics which have no rela-
vancy to the subject being taught,
were also discussed.
Participation in a faculty union
was a point of considerable consid-
eration among AAUP members.
The question is raised by the fact
that the faculty of two junior col-
leges, one which is located in Dear-
born, have joined a national union.
Tthics and what union methods of
protest are appropriate for the fa-
culty of a university are also pri-
mary points of interest.

*

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