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November 03, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-03

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PAFE TWO

t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVE31BER 3, 1966

PAFE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3.1966

FILMS-
Rays 'Pather Panchali': Monumental Film

Bernstein To Leave Post
As Philharmonic Leader

By PAUL SAWYER
Although each film in Satyajit
Ray's Apu trilogy is a separate
and self-contained unit, together
they form what is beyond doubt
the most monumental single work
in the history of cinema.
The theme is the life of a young
writer, traced from early child-
hood through the joys and trage-
dies of his young manhood. His
works are not all of equal interest,
Yet Ray at his best has moments
especially parts of the second film.
which impress one on first view-
ing, and on subsequent viewings
astonish-moments which in their
own way have never been equal
led.
As fo rthe first film, "Pather
Panchali," what can one say to do
justice to it except that it is one
of the greatest films ever made.
Its poetic intensity, its psycho-
logical suggestiveness, its lyrical
beauty seem to be the product of
such an accomplished master that
the actual circumstances of its
production are almost incredible.
Ray spent over two years on it,
with almost no money, and a crew
nearly all of whom including him-
self, had no professional experi-
ence.
Apu's Life
The film describes Apu's early
childhood in a poor household in
rural India. The subtle relation-
ships among the members of Apu's
family-the father, an unhurried
dreamer; the mother harrassed
and worn down by the struggle

against poverty; the grotesque old
aunt; the older sister, accused of
petty thievery from rich Neighbors
-are either stated or suggesred,
always by means of a few well-
selectedbdetails. Ray's genius lies
partly in the ability to suggest
powerful emotions and ironies,
and to give a precise definition of
character and situation by the
use of a single camera angle or
facial expression.

Another remarkable feature is
the spontaneity of his scenes, the
powerful sense of life happening
right in front of the camera. This
immediacy blends with the beauty
and compactness of Ray's images
to give a sense of concentrated
poetry. It is this blend of the
immediate and the archetypal, the
specific and the general, the time-
ly and the timeless that is perhaps

Across Campus
d A -$-;-.-A AA
IISSIn S

THURSDAY, NOV. 3
3:45 p.M.-Mental Health Re-
search Institute Seminar: Prof.
D. E. Berlyne of the University of
Toronto psychology department
will speak at seminar sessions on
"Motivational Effects of Auditory
Pitch and Complexity" in the
MHRI Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-History of Art Dept.
Lecture: Prof. Robert Branner of
Columbia University will speak on
"Saint Louis and the Arts" in
Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present an Apu Trilogy film
"Pather Fanchali" in the Staya-
uit RaY Festival Program in Archi-
tecture Aud.
7:30 p-m.-Prof. Thomas J. Sch-
riber, of the business administra-
tion school will conduct a demon-
stration of time-sharing comput-

1
3
1

DAIL OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an t
official pyblication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
tal responsibility. Notices should be)
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Rdor 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by/2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday, and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
raum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notes are not
accepted for publication. For more
i formation call 764429.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Day Calendar
School of Business Administration
Time Sharing Computer Demonstration
-Thomas J. Schriber, assistant profes-
sor of statistics: 130 Business Admin-
istration, 3 and 7:30 p.m.
Mental Health Research Institute
Seminar-D. E. Berlyne, professor of
psychology, University of Toronto, "Mo-
tivational Effects of Auditory Pitch and
Complexity": 057 MIHRI, 3:45 p.m.
History of Art Dept. Lecture-Robert
Banner, Department of Art History and
Archaeology, Columbia University,
"Saint Louis and the Arts": Aud. B,
Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.;
Cinema Guild Satyajit Ray Festival
-The Apu Trilogy, "Pather Panchall":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:05 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA Repertory Company in
Sartre's "The Flies": Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.;
University Musical ,Society Concert-
Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Oza-
wa, conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Open Seminar-"Radical Theology and
the Death of God," Guild House, 802
Monroe St., 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Of-
fice of Religious Affairs.
Dept. of Speech Presentation: Stu-
dent Laboratory Theatre Program, will
be the one-act play "The Outlaw," by
August Strindberg, on Thurs., Nov. 3
promptly at 4:10 p.m. in the Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
General Notices
Tuskegee Applications: University
students may now apply for the Tus-
kegee-Michigan student exchange pro-
gram for the second semester at Tuske-
gee Institute, Tuskegee, Ala., Feb. 3 to
June 3, 1967.
Applications for the program may
be obtained from John Chavis or Mrs.
Jean Potter in the Tuskegee Exchange
Office, 1223 Angell Hall. Forms should
be completed and returned to the ex-
change office by Nov. 15, 1966.
Winter Program of Graduate Student
Research Fund Grants: Is now open for
competition.
In preparing his application, of which
i5 copies should be submitted to the
Graduate School, the student should
present a clear statement concerning
the nture of his research problem and
the estimated cost of the specific items
of expenditure. The application should
be accompanied by a supporting let-
CINEMA
presents
TOM JONES
n color
With Albert Finney
Susannah York
7 and 9:15 P.M.
Friday, Saturday,

er of which there should also be 15
copies, from the chairman of his doc-i
toral committee.
For information and proposal guide-
lines, contact departmental chairmen
or Room 1014 Rackham Bldg. Deadline
for submission of applications is Tues.,
Nov. 15.
Dept. of Romance Languages Lecture:
On Mon., Nov. 7 at 4 p.m. in Rackham
Amphitheatre there will be a lecture
by Prof. Cecil Grayson from Oxford
University on "Alberti, Architect and
Writer (illustrated)."
Colloquium: Dr. Seymour Meyerson of
the American Oil Co. will speak oni
"Chemical Origins of Mass Spectra," on
Thurs., Nov. 3, at 8 p.m. in Room1
1300 of the Chemistry Bldg.
Psychology Colloquium: Prof. D. E.
Berlyne of the University of Toronto
will speak on "The Reinforcement of
Verbal Learning" on Fri., Nov. 4, at
4:15 p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall. Coffee
will be served from 3:45 to 4:15 p.m.
in 3417 Mason Hall.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Special Interviews for Journalism Ma-
jors Only: The Corning Leader, Inc.,
Corning, N.Y., publishers of The Leader
interviews on Fri., Nov. 4, all day, at
the Bureau of Appointments. Positions
in newspaper work on reporter and
desk. Call 764-7460 for appointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Local Office-Recorder. Conscientious
with ability to work with details of
records. Typing necessary. Exper. prefer-
red.
The African-American Institute, New
York, N.Y.-Department of Field Oper-
ations in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
(Continued on Page 8)

ers in Rm. 130 Bus. Ad. Bldg.
8:00 p.m - The Professional
Theatre Program will present the
APA's production of Satre's "The
Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Toronto Sym-
phony Orchestra conducted by
Seiji Ozawa will present a concert
in Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, NOV. 4
9:00 a. - Computer Funda-
mental Workshop sessions at
North Campus Commons.
9:00 a.m. - Programmed In-
structions Seminar in the East
Conference Rm. of Rackham.
4:30 p.m. - Prof. Rudolf Ek-
steing of the Reiss-Davis Child
Study Center of California will
speak on "Psychoanalysis in a
University Setting" at the Chil-
dren's Psychiatric Hospital.
7 and 9 p-m. - Cinema Guild
will present the second in the Apu
Trilogy series, "Aparajito" in
Architecture Aud"
8:00 p.m, - The Professional
Theatre Program will present the
APA's production of Satre's "The
Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-University Woodwind
Quintet will present a contempor-
ary chamber music concert in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
ARK
COFFEE HOUSE
1421 HILL ST.
"DEAD
SEA
SCROLLS"
Prof. MENDENHALL
WILL DISCUSS THE
CRUCIAL IMPORTANCE
OF THESE BIBLICAL
FINDINGS AND WHY
THEIR MEANING HAS
NOT BEEN PUBLISHED.
TH U RS., Nov. 3, 9:00

the unique character of Ray'st
work.
Because of its extraordinary
visual beauty and its rural subject,
"Pather Panchali" invites com-
parison with the film "Earth."
Beside it, however, "Earth" seems
static and stiffly impersonal. In
Ray's film there is a constant
sense of time passing, people
aging, images flowing and moving
like the free rythemlessness of
Ravi Shankar's music.
Certain visual motifs-notably
the pond with its various aspects
and the domestic animals that
grow up and give birth-add to
the sense of timeliness through
their recurrence, The age-old
symbol of the water takes on a
transcendent significance -- as
when the dead Aunt's cup falls
into the pond, or when the water-
insects flit and play on its snL.'face
like human beings in the precari-
ousness of their eixstence.
No director and perhaps no film
can in quite this way, and for such
an extended time, keep the viewer
suspended between laughter and
tears, between the airiest pleasure
and the profoundest emotion,
simply through a portrayal of or-
dinary people and events. "Pather
Panchali" is above all a film that
embodies a vision of the beauty
and tragedy of life, with a purity
and intensity that is rare in even
the highest art.

NEW YORK (P)-Leonard Bern-
stein said yesterday he will leave
as full-time music director of the
New York Philharmonic in the
spring of 1969 to spend most of
his time composing.
He will become "laureate con-
ductor" for life, an unusual title,
especially for a man who is now
only 48.
Bernstein first conducted the
Philharmonic at the age of 25,
filling in on short notice for Bru-
no Walter, who was ill.
He became the orchestra's music
director in 1958, the first native-
born American to head a major
orchestra in this country.
Bernstein has composed three
symphonies and other classical
music. He is known for his ballet
scores and scores' for the hit
Broadway musicals, "On The
Town," "Wonderful Town," "Can-
dide," and "West Side Story." He
received an Academy Award nom-
ination for the incidental music
for the film "On the Waterfront."
Bernstein, whose 10-year con-
tract expires at the end of the
1968-69 musical season, said that
"a time is arriving in my life when
I must concentrate maximally on
composing."
"This cannot be done," Bern-I
stein said, "while retaining the:
great responsibilities inherent in
the Philharmonic post, which is

a full-time commitment, and in-
deed more than that."
"It will, of course, be a wrench
for me to leave my post, but it
must be done," he said.
As "laureate conductor," Bern-
stein will still conduct the or-
chestra for several weeks during
the regular season and will take
part in the orchestra's recording
and television activities and its
tours.
Amyas Ames, president of the
New York Philharmonic Society.1
which controls the orchestra, said
the adjective "laureate" was
chosen for Bernstein to signify
"specially recognized" and "honor-
ed for achievement."

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DAILY CLASSIFIED PAGE

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(dir. Satyajit Ray-1952/58)
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* Presented in cooperation with the University Dept. of East Asian ,
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"All three shown in order, starting exactly at 7:00 with 10- r
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