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November 02, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PATE TWO

THE. MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVE ER.2,1966c

PAETO HEMCIA-DIYWDESA.NVMBR21-

, .

Music
Contemporary Music Festival
To Honor Resident Composer

Mothers Organize
For More Benefits

(Continued from Page 1)
which have been late and that
most delays of more than a few

By ANN L. MARCHIO
"Still. Are New Worlds" will
highlight the opening of the 1966
Contemporary Music Festival to-
night at 8:30 in Hill Aud. The
five-program festival is honoring
Ross Lee Finney, composer in res-
idence, and is open to all without
charge.
Finney, whose work will be feat-
ured in each concert, studied in
Paris with Nadia Boulanger and
later in Vienna with Alban Berg.
The opening number of the Nov. 4
program will be an homage to
Berg, based on variations from
Berg's last work, the "Violin Con-
certo."
In 1928 F nney .spent a year at
Harvard University, then joined
the faculty . at Smith College,
where he -remained until coming
to the University in 1948. During

his tenure at Smith he founded the
Smith College Music Archives and
the Valley Music Press, and con-
ducted the Northhampton Cham-
ber Orchestra. His "First String
Quartet" received a Pulitzer Prize
in 1931.
World War II separates his ear-
lier compositions from the better-
known ones of the mid-40's. After
duty in the Office of Strategic
Services, for which he received a
Purple Heart and Certificate of
Merit, F i n n e y composed the,
"Christmastime Sonata," the "Pil-
grim Psalms," and the 'Fourth
String Quartet," the first twelve-
tone work in his portfolio and the
first one to make use of what he
has come to call "complementary."
During the past sixteen years
Finney has received numerous
commissions and has traveled

abroad as a lecturer for the State days are due to change of address.
Dept. in 1963, with a research The HEW organization is also
grant from the Horace H. Rack- demanding separate grants for
ham school of graduate studies, winter clothing, school fees and
he established the University Elec- winter heating. At the present
tronic Music Studio. His commis- time, $9 per month is allotted
sioned score for the Sesquicenten- for clothing and incidentals.
nial Celebration will be presented School fees must come out of the
at the 1967 May Festival. funds for incidentals. A grant of
Finney himself will lead the from $7 to $13 a month is allo-
fourth program in the current cated for heating.
festival. It will be a lecture, "Does HEW is also asking for a list
Music Have Form?", and is sched- of all welfare ADC recipients. The
uled for Nov. 7 at 8:30 in Rack- welfare office claims that this in-
ham Lecture Hall. formation is confidential. However,
Finney will be interviewing him- they will release the amount of
self on the tape recorder and de- aid a recipient is receiving and
monstrating its potential. "With what their welfare status is if a
the recorder I can bring in any person wishing the information
performer I want," he said. "There presents himself in person and
will be a couple of symphony identifies the client in question.
orchestras and some others." This includes private business
The other four programs are men as well as social agencies
' -1 and schools. However, the welfare

r
t
a
f
G
ii
'
i
i

least until the case has been de-
cided." The Union claims that
many people have been cut off
before a hearing takes place.
The official policy of the wel-
fare department on termination is
that if a person is "found ineligi-
ble to receive aid" the ADC
grants must be terminated im-
mediately. Groups of ineligibility
are: income large enough to meet
budget needs; other adequate sup-
port; or, general "non-coopera-
tion."
The Union has also claimed that
members and possible members of
their organization have been har-
rassed and that they have not
been able to freely distribute their
newsletter.
HEW also claims that when a
client has been given notice, that
by the time she has filed a com-
plaint, gone to court and then
been reinstated, that she has lost
several checks. This policy they
feel is unconstitutional.
The amount of aid which the
mother receives is based on an
arbitrary budget from the state
determined by availability of
funds. Amounts needed per month
for food, clothing and incidentals
are fixed. The amount allotted for
shelter varies from county to coun-
ty.
ADC does not, however, provide
the full amount needed in each
budget. At the present time, there
is a maximum allotment of $128
for a two person family and a
$28 increase for each additional
member.

CINEMA
II
presents
TOM JONES
in color
With Albert Finney
Susannoh York
1 and 9:15 P.M.
Friday, Saturday,
and Sunday
Aud. A, Angell Hall
Advance tickets
ova ilable 663-5832
(I.D. required)

Aud. A, Haven Hall

7:30-9 P.M.

SPECIAL EDUCATION COLLOQUIUM
speaker: Dr.Vernon Haubuick
Prof. of Ed. at U. of Wisconsin
topic: "ROMANTICS & REALISTS: AN INSIDE
VIEW OF THE DISADVANTAGED CHILD"

F
I
*

Nov. 2
spon. by Special Education Com. of the School of Education

Police Brutality
L EROY CAPPAERT
Will Lead an Informal
Discussion on This Crucial Topic
WED., NOV. 2, AT 9:00
ARK COFFEE HOUSE
1421 HILL ST

Lashes. White House
Censorship Policies

-CHICAGO-Sigma Delta Chi,
professional journalism society, is-
sued a report yesterday, crticizing
the Johnson Administration for
maintaining. "an atmosphere of
censorship and secrecy," partic-
ularly at the White House and
Pentagon.
The society's annual Freedom of
Information Committee report
pointed to the passage of a federal
open records law as the most sig-
nificant achievement in the last
year, but warned that the new
law-effective July 4, 1967-could
be distorted by a secrecy-minded
administration.- The committee
urged constant vigilance by news-
men.
President Johnson was criticized
for virtually ending the regular,
open, live television press confer-
ences. He has had too few press
conferences,, and the general rou-
tine has been such that it is dif-
ficult for any. other than White
House regulars to attend, the re-
port said.
- The report commented exten-
sively on the controversies that
have, existed - between the press
and the bar with regard to the
news coverage of criminal law en-
forcement and court trials. While
urging thoughtful balance and re-
straint in the coverage of law en-
forcement and court matters, it
expressed great concern over the

Reardon report by the American
Bar Association Committee.
The Reardon report was char-
acterized as "the most disturbing
development" in press-bar rela-
tions, and the committee warned
that strict . application of the
Reardon report' carries with it the
potential for unduly curbing and
even destroying the watchdog role
of the press."
The Sigma Delta Chi report em-
phasized the dictum in the Shep-
pard case which states: "The press
does not simply publish informa-
tion about trials but guards
against the miscarriage of justice
by subjecting the police, prosecu-
tors and judicial processes to ex-
tensive public scrutiny and criti-
cism.".
The most critical comment was
aimed at the Defense Depart-
ment's 1962 Pentagon directive re-
quiring that every official, mili-
tary and civilian, make a report
to the press office before the end
of the working day.
The Defense Department, it was
warned, is standing in the way of
the free flow of information to
the press and to congressional
committees. Also, steps have been
taken that can seriously hamper
the audits as well as the public
commentary of the General Ac-
counting Office (GAO) when
dealing with Pentagon waste or
mismanagement.

concerts. Thnis evenings perior-
mance wil feature the University
symphony orchestra and chorus.
Friday, Nov. 4 at 8:30 in Rack-
ham Lecture ,Hall will be a pro-
gram of chamber works. Included
will be "Five Pieces for String
Quartet" (1957) by Leslie Bassett
and "String Quartet" (1965) by
Donald Harris. Bassett is a Pu-
litzer Prize-winning professor of
composition at the University and
a former pupil of Finney.
The Stanley Quartet will be
featured in the Sunday, Nov. 6
concert in Rackham Lecture Hall
at 4:15 p.m. The final concert on
Wed., Nov. 9 in Hill Aud. at 8:30
will 'present pieces for organ,
chamber orchestra, solo and
chorus.

office claims they will not release
lists of recipients, only informa-
tion concerning identified individ-
uals. HEW, however, says that
lists have been released to such
organizations as planned parent-
hood as well as other social agen-
cies.
Termination
A review of the process of ter-
mination of aid is also requested.
The group reviewing would include
representatives of the Social Serv-
ices Department, experts for the
universities and elsewhere, and
members of the HEW organiza-
tion.
The statement also reads, "we
demand that in cases where a
recipient has requested a hear-
ing, welfare payments continue at

LN CHANDLERt
-Columbia records recording artist
-mrs. chandler's husband
-folk singer & composer

E I

AshOW.'L

Ferency Claims Attempt
To Halt Political Plan

myrtle, the new

programs are

By The Associated Press
Democratic gubernatorial candi-
date Zolton Ferency charged yes-
terday that Gov. George Romney
"attempted to intimidate" a tele-
vision station manager into can-
celling a paid Democratic pro-
gram.
Ferency accused Romney of try-
ing "to enforce an information
blackout in the gubernatorial cam-
paign" by sending a telegram to
Elroy Strand, general manager of
WLUC-TV in Marquette, in regard
to a 28-minute. film based on a
two-hour debate between Romney
and Ferency.
Ferency said Strand first can-
celled the . 45-minute paid pro-
gram,' which included the tape,
and half an hour Monday took
back his stand. Strand said he
temporarily cancelled" the pro-
gram and this was not the result
of Romney's telegram.
Romney press aide Chuck Har-
mon says the informational tele-
grams went to the managers of
every TV station in the state, and
Romney "certainly doesn't think
he can tell any'TV station what to
do."
Romney and Sen. Robert Grif-
fin their airborne "blitz" cam-
paign in the Upper Peninsula.
Romney hailed the progress of the
Upper Peninsula under his admin-

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n
a.

Across Camp'us

4 .
4
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istration, saying that there had
been a 7 per cent increase in em-
ployment and a 39 per cent de-
cline in unemployment since he
took office in 1962.
Democratic senatorial candidate
G. Mennen Williams ate kielbasa
in the largely Polish-American
city of Hamtramck, and called for
international guarantees of Po-
land's nationhood. He called for
recognizing the Oder-Neisse line-
which would mean turning over
the former German provinces of
Silesia and Pomerania to Poland.
James F. O'Neill, the GOP can-
didate for State Board of Educa-
tian says the eight-member all-
Democratic Board is c o 11 e g e
oriented to disadvantage of ele-
mentary and high schools.
Phone 482-2056
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available, and are they a gas!
fOh, mama, is this really the end . . ."-B, Dylan
"Wow . -A. Fidder
Hail to thee, blithe spirit --P. B. Shelley
Chirp" -Charles

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2
7:30 p-m-Prof- Thomas J. Sch-
riber of the business administra-
tion school will conduct a demon-
stration of. time-sharing comput-
ers in Rm. 130 Bus. Ad. Bldg.
8:00 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present the
APA's production of Satre's "The
Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.

4:10 p.m.-History of Art Dept.
Lecture: Prof. Robert Branner of

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Pg1~
~ DISNEYpresents
OF DONE
OF.DONEGAL

Columbia University will speak
"Saint Louis and the Arts"
Aud. B.

on
in

7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present the Apu Trilogy film
"Pather Panchali" in the Staya-
t Ray Festival Program in Archi-
tecture Aud.

ROARING OUTOF
ThE 7'QENT/E' N/h TcO
-e-
JANUS FILMS presents
HAEU() ) I I 0ul0'
FUNNY SIDE OF LIFE
STARTS FRIDAY
MICHIGAN

li

ENDS
TONIGHT
THE WILDEST COMEDY OF THE YEARI

'V

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EXTRA
"CASALES CONDUCTS"

I

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LIMITED ENGAGEMENT STARTING THURSDAY
"THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY"

Ends Thursday
Dial 5-6290

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starnng PETER SUSAN TOM GORDON ANDREW
McENERY-HAMPSHlRE-ADAMS-JACKSON KEIR
Screenplay by Based on the book Co-producer Directed by
ROBERT WESTERBY 'Re yyR * Y BILL ANDERSON MICHAEL O'HERLfHY TECHNIICOL0R

ePLUSO

Complete Shows
at
1 :00-3:30-6:20--8:50

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II I II

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