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November 01, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-11-01

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PAGE STS

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1966

PAGE SIXTHE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 1. 1966

71

Petitioning Now Open
for
HONORS STEERING
COMMITTEE
Pick up petitions now
in 1210 Angell Hall Honors Office
DEADLINE FRIDAY, NOV. 11

Ann Arbor

High: Boos

vs.

Football

_='-
.. ...

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL
INTERVIEWS
Mr. Richard L. Nohl, a member of the Admissions
Board at the Harvard University Graduate School of
Business Administration, will be at the University of
Michigan on Monday, November 7, to talk to men
and women interested in graduate study in business
as a career of excitement and creative opportunity.
Requirements for admission for the two-year course,
leading to a degree of Master in Business Adminis-
tration (M.B.A.), include a college degree in any field
of concentration, a standing, in at least the top third
of the class, and a record of achievement in campus
activities, business, the military, or elsewhere. Sen-
iors, or others, wishing to talk to Mr. Nohi should
contact Miss Mildred D. Webber in the Bureau of
Appointments.

By GRAYLE HOWLETT
Ann Arbor High School has to
be a farm team of the University
'of Michigan. The academic air is
so thick you could cut it with a
slide rule.
Ann Arbor High is a place where
study halls are used for studying
and students wear letter sweaters
with their SAT scores on their
backs. If you walk the halls with-
out a copy of Plato's "Republic"
you're considered an enemy. And
if caught you must recite your
name, grade, and serial number-
all in digital computing code.
The cheerleaders there must
maintain a C-plus average and
have had a minimum of two
courses in crowd psychology. I
can remember back in my high
school days when cheerleaders had
to have other qualifications.
Even on football Friday nights
you get the feeling that the stu-
dent body is on a massive study
break and if Ann Arbor loses-
The New Ravens
are now at.the Schwabin
on Wednesdays and Sat-
urdays. For info. contact:
NO 8-8769

well, what the hell. There's al-
ways the books and that Quantum
Theory test on Monday.
Status Game
But as fate would have it (and
she usually does almost every
year), the biggest football game
in the state was dropped right in
Ann Arbors intellectual laps last
Friday night. The Bearcats from
Battle Creek Central, fresh from
their 17th straight victory and
rated No. 1 in the state, were
stacking their braun against the
the No. 2 ranked Ann Arbor Pio-
neers. The big question remained
whether or not the Ann Arbor
High campus could take it.
Ann Arbor's head coach Jay
Stielstra, a thin, serious looking
man who looks like your old math
teacher (he is, in fact, a social
science teacher) leaned back in
his chair on the afternoon of the
game and contemplated on the
effect the big game has had:
"We're a real sophisticated school.
Let's face it-we're no Massilon.
The general student population is
not caught up by sports. There's
a cosmopolitan atmosphere here.
The University is very influential
and this hurts the sports program
to a certain extent. But let me
emphasize that it's a nice climate.
"True we're really excited over
how many Merit Scholarship Win-
ners we get, but a big game will

bring them up. When they get the
big one, they really go wild."
Ricky-Ticky-Low
"Wild" seems to have different
connotations to the Ann Arbor
students, however, as evident in
their pre-game hoopla. Friday aft-
ernoon's pep rally brought out the
usual sign carriers but with the
excellent material Battle Creek
provided (home of Kellogg's
cereals), you'd think there would
be a little more hate conveyed.
Instead, the most witty one turn-
ed out to be "Dam the Creek," or
"A-square is greater than BC," in
perfect mathematical symbols,
probably just to let their teachers
know they hadn't forgotten.
Still it was the big game and
Stielstra talked unemotionally
about it. "We have no rivalry, as
such, with Battle Creek. We play-
ed them under similar conditions
in 1962 and 1964, but we don't
especially point to this game. We
play them one at a time."
Mayor Harry Wilklow Jr. of
Battle Creek and Mayor Wendell
E. Hulcher of Ann Arbor refused
to believe there was no rivalry and
played it big time all the way. If
Ann Arbor won, Mayor Wilklow
promised the Pioneers two cases of
cereal, a case of pet foods, and a
case of cookies, all Battle Creek
products.
If Ann Arbor lost, Mayor Hul-
cher owed the Bearcats an auto-

graphed game football, a key to,
the City, and the book "Michigan
Memories," nothing edible but
purely Ann Arbor products.
"It's really our offense against
their defense," Stielstra continued
getting back to football. "We can
score a lot of point. They've been
scored on only once. They're much
bigger than us. We're actually too
small for a class A team. They'll
try to run and crush us inside."
Anyone for Philo
Stielstra next turned to his phi-
losophy of tcoaching: "Psychology
is beyond me. I'm not the Woody
Hayes or Knute Rockne-type
coach. And the boys know this.
They don't go for any kind of
phoniness. Why, I couldn't hang
any type of signs in the locker
room or paste clippings in their
lockers. They wouldn't go for it.
They'd know it wasn't me. I just
stick to fundamentals and the
things we can control."
Mark Carrow, the curly-haired
quarterback for the Pioneers,
seems to be the perfect exponent
for the Stielstra philosophy. He's
the type of guy that eats pizza
with a fork and says "thank you"
after an interview. His uniform
seems to always stay white and
looks like he could just slip on a
tweed coat over his pads and be
ready to go to the homecoming
dance.
He also just happens to be prob-
ably the best roll-out passer in the
state and is certain for All-State
honors. Stielstra describes him as
being "poised and an excellent
play caller. He's a fantastic ath-
lete and probably his least favo-

rite sport is football. He likes The Pioneers lacked the muscle
baseball first and then hockey." and were pushed around by the'
It was on the cool and collec- likes of Chuck Brown (240). Tom
tive head of Carrow that Ann Beard (238), Orville Sherrod
Arbor's fortunes rode and it look- (265), to mention a few, and it
ed like he'd do it. was the poundage up front which
Poised Effort broke halfbacks Andrew Johnson
After Battle Creek had forged and Eugene Brown on long jaunts,
out to a 17-7 lead, Carrow started as well as opening up holes for
his team from their own 35 and fullback Paul English, and a total
drove them to score with 1:20 left rushing game of 451 yards.
in the half. He completed four of Coach Jack Finn of Battle Creek
six, the last one to Tom Wood for concurred, "We were physically
the score after he had scrambled tougher. Even though we lost
in the backfield a la Fran Tark- Beard and Ball (Tim) in the sec-
engton to find the open receiver. ond half, we still held them score-
Battle Creek added a field goal less. We thought those reverses
before the half, but Ann Arbor with Johnson would work on a
took the second half kick-off and team like Ann Arbor (two TD runs
drove for the tying score. With of 84 yards and 76 yards) ."
work horse Bruce Sharemet and Stielstra, who thinks winning is
"I" back Fred Smith carrying harera, yo thanksing ws
most of the burden the drive sput- harder on you than losing, was
tered on the Battle Creek 12. Car- feeling the pain of a six-game
row went to the air. First one wFinningstreak snapped plus a
conference championship 10o s t:
went incomplete. Second pass in- "Sure they were big physically but
tercepted and that was the end they didn't wear us down. They
for academic cause, and Battle just broke those long runs on us
Creek added another TD fortheir and we missed the tackles."
LA ,i arn......anwemsethtcks"

41

26-13 margin.

pnryca Tltn4 RaFrarhac

Carrow admitted that this was rpuse That netresnes
the turning point along with In the boisterous Bearcat dress-
Stielstra. ing room, while basking in the
The turning point, however, 26-13 win and their preserved rat-
was best stated by one of the Ann ing of No. 1, Coach Finn received
Arbor cheerleaders at the Friday the biggest cheer when he a*-
afternoon skit. nounced that Cokes would be free
The cheerleaders, wearing cer- for all the football players this
tain equipment of the football week.
players, were explaining their It kind of makes you wonder
function to a cha-cha beat. The what Coach Stielstra would have
one with the shoulder pads chant- promised his team if the Pioneers
ed: "This is what our boys wear would have won. Free Cokes are
to build up something that isn't a little too phony for Ann Arbor
there." High.

*

..1
'1

P

I I

.1

FACULTY LUNCHEON

COLLEGE TEACHING
Cooperative College Registry
A free service of 13 denominations to some 200 church-related
liberal arts colleges throughout the United States. Administra-
tive and faculty positions in all areas of curriculum. Ph.D.'s pre-
ferred. Master's required. Salaries-$6,500 to $20,000 plus
fringe benefits. Make appointment for interviews through the
Bureau of Appointments, 3200 Student Activities Building, Mon-
day through Friday, November 14 through 18.

Cards Scamper Past Bears

All faculty

members are

invited to

a light (50c), informal luncheon
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2
12:00 Noon
Speaker: MRS. ELISE BOULDING
Place: Baptist Campus Center, 502 E. Huron
Please call to make reservations: NO 3-9376

11

G

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ST. LOUIS A')-St. Louis used
the running of rookie John Ro-
land and two key interceptions by
Larry Wilson to whip the Chicago
Bears 24-17 last night and move
back into first place in the Na-
tional Football League's Eastern
Conference.
The victory gave St. Louis a 6-
1-1 record in the Eastern Confer-
ence, a half-game better thaB sec-
ond place Dallas' 5-1-1 record.
Chicago, a member of the Western
Conference, is 3-4.
Roland sparked two first-quar-
GRAYLE HOWLETT
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
I

ter drives that gave the Cardinals
a quick 14-0 lead in the first half.
Wilson returned an intercepted
pass 29 yards for a fourth-quarter
St. Louis score, then intercepted
a Rudy Bukich pass on the Cardi-
nals' 13 late in the game to kill
a Bears' threat.

The Bears scored on a Bukich
sneak in the second quarter, then
again on an 80-yard pass play
from Bukich to Gale Sayers in the
fourth quarter.
Jim Bakken and Roger Leclerc
matched field goals to round out
the scoring.

Professional

Chicago
Montreal
Detroit
Toronto
New York
Boston

NHL
W L
4 0
3 1
2 4
1 1
1 2
1 3

T Pts. GF
0 8 22
0 6 12
0 4 22
2 4 10
1 3 11
1 3 13

GA
1!
8
24
10
18
19

r

SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Montreal 3, New York 0
Boston 3, Toronto 3 (tie)
SUNDAY'S RESULT
Detroit 8, Boston 1
MONDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled

Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Conference
W L T Pet. Pts. OP
St. Louis 6 1 1 .856 192 130
Dallas 5 1 1 .833 266 106
Cleveland 5 2 0 .714 234 124
Washington 5 3 0 .625 174 164
Philadelphia 4 4 0 .500 163 184
Pittsburgh 1 5 1 .167 133 218
New York 1 5 1 .167 100 214
Atlanta 0 8 0 .000 95 299
Western Conference
Green Bay 7 1 0 .875 216 81
Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 176 122
Los Angeles 4 4 0 .500 131 134
San Francisco 3 3 1 .500 132 169
Chicago 3 4 0 .429 94 123
Minnesota 2 4 1 .333 150 129
Detroit 2 6 0 .250 111 170
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Green Bay 31, Detroit 7
Washington 27, Philadelphia 13
Cleveland 49, Atlanta 17
Baltimore 17, Los Angeles 7
Dallas 52, littsburgh 21
Minnesota 28, San Francisco 3
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
St. Louis 24', Chicago 17
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division

HOW TO GO BAROQUE WITHOUT GOING BROKE
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TODAY'S GAME
Boston at Chicago
NBA
Eastern Division
W L
Philadelphia a 0 1
Boston 4 1.

Pct.
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New York
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Weste
Detroit
San Francisco
Chicago
St. Louis
Los Angeles

BUY
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2 4 .333
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Boston
Buffalo
New York
Houston
Miami

W L TI
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SATURDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 127, Cincinnati 115
Philadelphia 138, Boston 96
Detroit 103, Baltimore 97
St. Louis 110, Los Angeles 109
SUNDAY'S RESULT
Detroit 124, Los Angeles 121

4
3
?.

3
5

Pct. Pts. OP
.667 151 149
.571 201 187
.571 172 155-
.375 207 194
.286 116 185

2
0
0

4.

Western
Kansas City 6
San Diego 5
Oakland 4
Denver 1

Division
2 0 .750 285 160
2 1 .714 198 123
4 0 .500 153 174
7 0 .125 108 264

*

per SEE
recordSTRE

MONDAY'S GAMES SUNDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled Buffalo 33, New York 23
Kansas City 48, Houston 23
TODAY'S GAME Boston 24, Oakland 21
San Francisco at Chicago San Diego 24, Denver 17

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JOIN THE DAILY
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Demonstrate Against The War-
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OF

I

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