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October 30, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-30

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEY 3

SUDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

a aA V N V " u

W in
Dull Day:
Mendota
And Beer
By CHUCK VETZNER
Sports Editor
Special To The Daily
MADISON-Bartlett would t
over in his grave.
What a string of juicy qui
yesterday's game produced! I
logue sounded like the script fi
Miss Kelly's third grade class p:

Welcomed-Unemotionally

1
urn
otes
Xa-
rom
)lay.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Baby Badgers Tumble Frosh

"Well, Bump,
think?"
"I think we
game."
Meanwhile.
"Well, Milt,
think?"
"I think we
game.'

what do you
played a good
what do you
played a good

A Live Dud
A Badger rooter excitedly claim-
ed, "This is the most exciting
game I've seen in two years." This
guy must spend his autumn Satur-
days practicing the dead man's
float in Lake Mendota. Yet the
contest was not a yawner. It sim-
ply wasn't conducive to those
yummy statements that keep re-
porters scribbling on their yellow
pads.
Michigan was expected to win,
and it did. Wisconsin was expect-
ed to improve but lose, and it did.
So what else is new? It would take
Casey Stengel's writers to get good
material out of this football game.
The game itself was not a dud,
but it never set off any fireworks
either. Those long kickoff returns
and the last-minute touchdown
generated excitement which ended
with the final gun.
Silence . .
Milt Bruhn talks to the press in
his office with the reporters gath-
ered around. When he called for
questions, the response sounded
like the city room of the New York
Herald-Tribune. Man, it was dud.
Finally, Bruhn and his sidekicks
did get around to chattering- A
really moving commentary on the
Ohio State-Minnesota game.
Back in the Michigan locker
room, things were really humming.
The sound of the showers was sim-
ply fascinating. The reporters were
making thrilling questions. I've
heard waitresses produce more ex-
citement with an order for peanut'
butter and jelly on whole wheat
toastF
Forget It
But, of course, the best cracks
always occur on the field. In the
third quarter Dave Fisher took his
favorite pitchout play 34 yards to
the two, setting up the third Mich-
igan score. Back at the 15 a flag
was down and both sides had
awfully guilty f a c e s. Elliott
charged toward the referee to get
the lowdown.
"Pulling the face mask against
Red (Wisconsin)," explained the
official.
Replied Elliott, "We'll take the
game, thank you."

-Associated Press
TEARING AT BADGER FULLBACK Wayne Todd, Michigan
linebacker Frank Nunley and another unidentified Wolverine
hold him for no gain. The Michigan defense contained the
223-pound Todd all afternoon, allowing him only three yards
rushing.
LBJ EFFIGY, TOO:
Female Sports Editor,
'Beard' Spice Scene
By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER 'age for you, debate whether Vid-
Special To The Daily mer missed Clancy or Clancy miss-
ed the ball. Or wonder when Row-
about a school like Wisconsin, that ser will intercept knowing he
could get some glory out of it.
would rather hang LBJ in effigy I suppose once you have to re-
than their football coach? sort to writing statistics instead of
What can you do when a foot- idiosyncracies, you've reached the
ball coach looks as uninspiring as I stage where you can sit sophisti-
the lawyer for the AMA, and the catedly in the pressbox and discuss
coach who watches the action technicalities as Miss Seidler does.
from the pressbox wears a beard? But somehow that seems less re-
h t i f munerative than bouncing up and

By BILL LEVIS
Special To The Daily
MADISON - The Michigan
freshmen were unable to hold on
to "a raisin in the sun" against
the baby Badgers yesterday as
they lost to Wisconsin 25-14, at
Middleton High School.
Playing against the treacherous
early morning sun on the high
school field laid out from east to
west, the Wolverine frosh fumbled
two kickoffs that resulted in a
pair of Wisconsin touchdowns in
the first quarter. The Badgers also
turned an early pass interception
into a score which gave them a
19-0 lead with three periods to go.
Michigan freshman coach Bill
Dodd said after the game that
"the sun may have been a factor,
but Wisconsin outhit us in the
first half. We just couldn't get
the ball out of our own territory
when we had it and we just
couldn't field the kickoffs."
Too Tight to Tackle
The disappointed coach went on
to say that "we were tense out,
there and just couldn't get into
the ball game in the first half."
The young Wolverines had trouble
stopping the Badger offense al-
most all day long. Led by quarter-
back Lou Ritcherson, the son of
Wisconsin varsity coach Les Rit-
cherson, the novice Badgers out-
rushed the Maize and Blue 192
to 116 yards.
Wisconsin scored its first touch-
down with five minutes to go in
the first period after Badger John
Broders intercepted a pass thrown
by Wolverine Brian Healy. Brod-
ers ran it back to the Michigan
33. Several plays later Ritcherson
scored easily on a 15-yard sweep
around right end.
Who Forgot Sunglasses?
Michigan fumbled the ensuing
Badger kickoff and pickedup its
own miscue only to drop the pig-
skin again, this time with the
Badgers recovering on the Wolver-
ine 17. After a gain of ten yards
on a run by Stu Voigt, Ritcherson
passed to Mel Reddick in the left
corner of the end zone for the
score. The extra point was blocked
by Michigan's Richard Caldarazzo.
On the following kickoff, Mich-
igan fumbled again, and John
LeLonde recovered for Wisconsin
on the Michigan 14-yard line. A
few plays later, Ritcherson scam-
pered around right end for ten
yards and the score- The extra
point try was again blocked, this
time by Eric Sorenson.
Pryor Primes Defense
The Michigan defense, which
had been allowing the Badger
runners to sweep around the ends
in the first quarter, tightened up
the rest of the game, as the Wol-
verines only allowed the Badgers
one more score- Led by 6'4", 230-
pound Cecil Pryor of Corpus
Christi, Texas, a linebacker, the
Michigan defense bore down. Phil
Seymour, the cousin of Notre

Dame's pass-catching end Jim1
Seymour, broke into the Badger,
secondary several times to dropi
the Wisconsin signal caller for big
losses.
"In the second half, the Wol-
verine attack began to open up,"i
according to Coach Dodd. "We1
were tense in the first half, butE
we began to move in the second.1
We didn't make any changes, we1
just began to be ourselves out
there."
Curtiss to the Rescue
Tom Curtiss went in to quar -
terback Michigan in the second
half and sparkplugged the offen-
sive effort. John Gabler, brother
of former Michigan quarterback
Wally Gabler, topped all MichiganI
rushers with 55 yards in 14 carriesI
while Tom Weinmann gained 321
yards in 10 carries.
The Wolverines got on the
scoreboard on the first play of the
fourth quarter as Curtiss passed
ten yards to Jim Mandich and
then hit Bill Harris for 48 yards
and the final score midway in the
last period. Michigan attempted a
two point conversion after both
touchdowns, a Curtiss-to-Mandich
aerial giving the Wolverines two
markers after the first score. The
second try fell incomplete.
Mandich and Harris ranked
one-two in pass catching for the
Wolverines as .they gathered in
three and two, respectively.
The Badgers were paced on the~
ground by Voigt who carried the
ball 19 times for 60 yards, and in
the air by Ritchersonswho com-
pleted four of nine passes for 62
yards and two touchdowns. Red-
dick, who led the city of Chicago
in basketball scoring last year,
was the favorite target of Ritch-
erson, grabbing three passes for
55 yards and a touchdown.
Shades of Bubba Smith
Wisconsin was not without its
Texas-bred youngsters as big
Lucius Blair from Houston, Texas,
led the Badger defenders. He was
brought to Wisconsin along with
Frank Louis, a mammoth defen-
sive tackle from Beaumont, Texas,
by Coach Ritcherson.
The morning was marked by
sloppy play as Michigan fumbled
eight times while the budding
Badgers fumbled seven times. The

big difference was that Wisconsin
was able to recover four of Mich-
igan's fumbles while the Wolver-
ines could only get one of the
opposition's.
The Michigan frosh hope to
improve their performance when
they meet Toledo next Friday aft-
ernoon at Ann Arbor High School
in their second and final game of
the season.
SCORES
Arkiansas 34, Texas A & M 0
Pacific 38,San Jose State 35
Utah 27, New Mexico 0
Kansas 3, Kansas State 3 (tie)
Oklahoma St. 14, Iowa St. 14 (tie)
Oregon 28, Idaho 7
Oregon State 41, Washington State 13
Virginia Tech 23, Florida 21
Eastern Michigan 16, Wayne State 0
Dayton 20, Ohio U. 12
Georgia 28, North Carolina 3
North Carolina State 42, Virginia 21
Colgate 21, Lehigh i5
Princeton 24, Brown 7
Penn State 33, California 15
Rutgers 16, Boston U. 7
Cornell 31, Columbia 6
Harvard 27, Pennsylvania 7
Texas Tech 35, Rice 19
Drake 17, North Texas State 13

Nicholson M/C Sales
224 S. First St.
Hours: 9 to 9 Monday thru Friday
and 9 to 6 Saturday

presents 2 FREE Halloween Movies
"THE WHITE ZOMBIE"
and
A Surprise Horror Movie
Mon, Oct. 31st, 8 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

blame Milt Bruhn, or the half of
the team lost to ineligibility and
resignation, or whether it was the
lackluster 22 who were left, the
student body seems to have dis-
owned the Badgers in favor of the
Kollege Klub Bar and Lake
Mendota.
Pro Defeatism
Even Diane Seidler, sports editor
of the Daily Cardinal (and a girl,
yet), mechanically moaned some-
what before halftime, "If they
score again, they'll lose by one
lousy point anyway." That's call-
ed professional non-involvement.
Now at Michigan, you can tense
your right kneecap for Detwiler in
remembrance of times past, yell
"Go Fish" and glow with the as-
surance that Fisher will gain yard-

down for a winning team.
But There's Schinke
Wisconsin does have record'
holding Tom Schinke who booted
eight for ten field goals this sea-
son and who Diane approbated
with, "When you have a lousy
team, it's refreshing to see one guy
who is good." But Schinke evoked
unheartfelt applause for his ac-
complishments.
The solution for the Badgers
might be a few resounding victor-
ies. It must taste like bitter coffee
to admit that a game you lost sub-
stantially was your most interest-
ing one.

w . l

I

'M' Badgers Wisconsin

MICH.
First Downs 18
Rushing 13
Passing 4
Penalties 1
Total No. of Rushes 53
Net Yardage 303
Net Yards Rushing 232
Net Yards Passing 71
Forward Passes Att. 20
Completed 9
Intercepted by 1
Yds. Int. Returned 13
Total Plays 73
Kickoffs Returned by 4
Yds. Kicks Returned 104
Fumbles 4
Ball Lost By 2
Penalties, Number 5
Yards Penalized 73
MICHIGAN 7 7 7
WISCONSIN 0 7 3

WIs.
21
9
8
4
46
312
127
185
26
13
0
0
72
5
162
5
2
5
65
7-28
7-17

Boyajian
Todd
Yanakos
Wood
Schumitsch

Wisconsin
9
24
4
8
1

PASSING
Michigan
Att. Comp. P
Vidiner 20 9 .
Wisconsin
Boyajian 25 13 .
Ryan 1 0 .
PASS RECEIVING

7
80
12
26
2
Pct.
450
520
000

0.8
3.3
3.0
3.3
2.0
Yds.
71
185
0
Ave.
4.0
10.3
3.0
2.0
21.0
12.5
5.5
-11.0
13.10

Vidmer
Detwiler
Ward
Fisher
Reynolds
Johnson
Sharpe

RUSHING
Michigan
Tri
1
f

J
es Net. Ave.
0 14 1.4
9 38 4.2
4 60 4.3
3 99 7.6
2 4 2.0
4 13 3.3
1 4 4.0

Detwiler
Clancy
Ward
Sipp
McCauley
Fritz
Yanakos
Schumitsch
Todd
Kemp
Schaffner

Michigan
No.
1
6
1
1
Wisconsin
7
2
2
1
1
PUNTING
Michigan
Wisconsin

Yds.
4
62
3
2
147
25
11
-11
13

No. Ave.
5 45.2
5 43.2

SLj
AUC
jocks and
characters1

4
oti
will

VE>
her sundry
be offered
st bidder

It does all the work,
but on Saturday night which onegoes to the party?
Once upon a time there was an ugly little bug.
It could go about 27 miles on just one gallon of gas.
It could go about 40,000 miles on just one set of
tires. And it could park in tiny little crevices no big-
ger than a bug.
It was just right for taking father to the train or
the children to school. Or for taking mother to the
grocery store, drugstore, dime store and all the
enchanting places mothers go when everyone else
is working.
The ugly little bug was just like one of the family.
But alas, it wasn't beautiful.
So for any important occasion the poor ugly
little bug would be replaced. By a big beautiful
chariot, drawn by 300 horses!
Then, after a time, a curious thing happened.
The ugly little bug (which was made very sturdily)
never got uglier. But the big beautiful chariotdidn't
exactly get more beautiful. In fact, in a few years
its beauty began to fade. Until, lo and behold, the
ugly little bug didn't look as ugly as the big beautiful
chariot! The moral being: if you want to show
you've gotten somewhere, get a big beautiful
chariot. But if you simply want to get somewhere,

,;
f :

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