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October 30, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-30

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PAFE TWQ

THE MICItIFO XN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1966

PAEE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1966

THEATRE
Color, Action Sustain 'Thirteen Clocks'

Science, Culture Topics
Of UNESCO Discussion

By J.F. PERKIN
"The Thirteen Clocks" by James
Thurber, as adapted by Fritz Lyon
for University Players, is, to a
certain extent, an unfortunate
choice for a Children's Theatre
production. The play has an ex-
tremely convoluted plot, most of
which seems to ne beyond the
grasp of the children who com-
prise the audience and at whom
the play is aimed.
However, this presentation man-
ages to redeem itself through the
use of broad action and portrayals
which are able to catch and hold
to a large degree the fickle at-
tention of the young audience.
William Moore, as the Duke of
Coffin Castle, is an eminently
hlissable villain, projecting enough

nastiness to fulfill this function
despite confusions over (his exact
relationship to the heroine, Sara-
linda) or (the manner of the
"death of time"). Gale Murray as
Saralinda is a very acceptable
princess.
Russell Jennings is similarly ac-
ceptable as the hero, who is con-
fusingly a mixture of prince and
beggar. Jennings never clearly es-
tablishes the motivation or gene-
ology of the prince, but he does
present a "good guy" in opposition
to the evil duke.
Extremely successful portrayals
from the standpoint of the audi-
ence were' Hark, the evil duke's
minion, played by David Duboff,
and the duke's guards, Alice Ap-
plebaum, Roy Baldridge, Mark

Bowles, and Frances Shelley, who
Mark Sennett their way, through
hue and cry.
The best part of the play is
undoubtedly Judith Noble, unex-
plained and unexeplainable char-
acter who bounces in and out of
the play, foiling the duke and
aiding the prince and princess, in
a bumblingly incompetent yet suc-
cessful manner.
All of the aforementioned char-
acters are given a great boost in
their endeavors to capture their
audience by the colorful and ima-
ginative costumes designed by
James Berton Harris.
Thus, "The Thirteen Clocks,"
despite the handicap of an in-
tricate plot too involved to be
conveyed to its young audience, is
salvaged to a great extent by the

color and broad, slapstick action
which it encompasses. The chil-
dren at the end are not sure what
happened to the clocks, who Prince
Zorn really is, or exactly how the
duke is related to the Princess
Saralinda, much less what the
Golux is doing in the play in the
first place, or how Hagga, the
woman who weeps jewels, is intro-
duced. But there is enough in the
play to keep their fidgets tied
more to interest than to restive-
ness.
Director Margaret McKerrow
has so guided the presentation of
the play that while sacrificing to-
tally what litlte chance the chil-
dren might have for comprehend-
ing the plot, she allows its flash-
iness to sustain her audience.

(Continued from Page 1)
working on his Master's degree in
C i v il Engineering (sanitary),
termed his study here a "valuable
experience" for three reasons: the
English language has many good
books in his field, the opportunity
to meet professors with a wealth
of experience and the complete-
ness of the University's libraries.
Lugo, who has been here since
August, 1965, holds a fellowship
from the World Health Organ-
ization and the Venezuelan gov-
ernment. He said that his govern-
ment awards the fellowships on
the basis of achievement, with the
stipulation that when the holders
return they will work for the gov-
ernment for two years.
Better Understanding
Chai Chin Suh from Korea, who
is studying Mechanical Engineer-
ing at the University under a fel-
lowship from UNESCO, expressed
the same sentiments. He said the
primary purpose of the fellowships
was to build better understanding
among nations and to promote
education, science and culture
around the world,
Suh, who studied for his Mas-
ter's 'degree at the University of
-Minesota approximately ;ten years
iv- 'has been teaching at the
UniVersity of Seoul, Korea, for the

past 15 years. He points out that ;
now, after his teaching experience.
he is better able to know what he
needs to learn here, adding that
the knowledge and experience he
gains here wil benefit all of thet
students he will teach when he re-
turns to Korea next year.
Information Center
The International Center's UN
Committee was established last
April for the purpose of "keeping
the international student body up-
to-date on the work of the United
Nations and related international
organizations such as WHO (the
World H e a l t h Organization)
UNESCO, and UNICEF (the Unit-
ed Nations Children's Fund), ac-
cording to Adam Frisch, '67, chair-
man of the Committee.
Presently numbering about 35
active members, the committee is
engaged in such projects as ar-
ranging informal lectures for the'
University's housing system, draw-
ing up a speakers list of interna-
tional persons on campus willing
to give their time for discussions of
the UN and of their home. coun-
tries, arranging library displays
about the UN, and arranging spe-
cial projects, such as the sale of
UNICEF Christmas cards, for the
observance of Human Rights Day

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The Week To Come: a Campus Calendar'

..,

SUNDAY, OCT. 30 Toronto psychology department Co. will present Sartre's "The
2:30 and 8 p.m.--The APA Rep- will speak at seminar sessions on Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
ertoryCompany will present Sar- "Motivational Effects of Auditory Theatre.-
tres' "The Flies" in the Lydia Pitch and Complexity" in the 8:30 p.m.-University Woodwind
Mendelssohn Theatre. MHRI Bldg. Quintet will present a contempor-
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild 4:10 p.m.-History of Art Dept. ar chamber music concert in
Halloween Weekend Festival will Lecture: Prof. Robert Branner of Rackham Lecture Hall.
present Ted Browning's "Freaks" Columbia University will speak on SATURDAY, NOV. 5
in Architecture- Aud. "Saint Louis and the Arts" in 9:00 a.m.-Computer Workshop
MONDAY, OCT. 31 Aud. B.. sessions at North Campus Com-
4:00 p.m.-Engineering Mechan- 7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild mons.
-ics Seminar: Prof. Lewis N. How- will present the Apu Trilogy film 9:00 a.m.-Center for Research
ard of Massachusetts Institute of "Pather Panchali" in the Staya- on Learning and Teaching work-
Technology will speak on "Prob- lit Ray Festival Program in Archi- shop on "Programmed Instruc-
lems in the Theory of Rotating tecture Aud. tion" in Rackham.
Fluids," in Rm. 325 W. Engineer- 7:30 p m.-Prof. Thomas J. Sch-
Ing, riber of the business administra-
tion school will conduct a demon-
'TUESDAY, NOV. 1 s tscoo dc cnpu-
Insrumntstrato of time-sharing ompu-
12:30 p.m.- Wind Instrument ers in Rm. 130 Bus. Ad. Bldg.
39 oncert: : School of n Music public ! 1 La
concert:I the North Cmpus reb 8:00 pm.--The APA Repertory WOODYALLEN THE W
conertaln the North Campus re- Co. will present Sartre's "The STRIKE
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Co. will present Sartre's "The Theatre . -h Tr-
Flies" In the Lydia Mendelssohn 8:30 p.m.-The Toronto Sym-
Theatre. phony Orchestra conducted by SEEHAR J
Seiji Ozawa will present a concert al p
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2 In Hill Aud.
8:30 a.m-Parent Education In- EX
stitute discussion of: "Better Lives FRIDAY, NOV. 4 "CASALES C
for All Children" in the lobby of 9:00 a-m- - Computer Funda-
the League. mental Workshop sessions at IMITED ENGAGEMENT
7:30 pm--Prof- Thomas J Sch- North Campus Commons.L"TEDAGEN
riber of, the business administra- 9:00 a.m. - Programmed In- "THE AGONY AN
tion school will conduct a demon- structions Seminar in the East
stration of time-sharing comput- Conference Rm. of Rackham.
ers in-Rm. 130 Bus. Ad. Bldg. 4:30 p.m. - Prof. Rudolf Ek- wlrrrrr --r----rr--r
8:00 pm,-The APA Repertory steing of the Reiss-Davis Child
- Co. will present Sartre's "The Study Center of California will
Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn speak on "Psychoanalysis in a ,
Theatre. University Setting" at the Chil- C
8:30 p.m.-University Symphony dren's Psychiatric Hospital. s
Orchestra and Chorus will present 7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild I
a concert conducted by Prof. Josef will present the second in the Apu
Blatt, with Henri Honnegger as Trilogy series, "Aparajito" in "
guest cellist in Hill Aud. Architecture Aud. I
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory -
THURSDAY, NOV.3 . Special Hal ov
3:45 pm.-Mental Health Re-
-search Institute Seminar: Prof. r
D. E. Berlyne of the University of g -
LIMITED ENGAGEMEN I (ONE NIG
STARTS Phone NO 2-6264
WEDNESDAY! DTonight:
LAST 3 DAYS!
r
8 HANG-UP1S FR
FREA
(dir. Tod Bro
American. Brilliant b
WALT DJSNEYe Short: "BE R
E with the Ke
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OPDONEGA Still o
M ENERY-HAMPSHIRE 7 and
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Technicolor* AVANT
" -d- EXPERIMEA
I1Y OR NWINNERS AND HIG
at 1.00-3:00-5:05-715-9:20 FOURTH ANN ARB
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7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present "The World of Apu"
in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory
Co. will -.present Sartre's "The:
Flies" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
SUNDAY, NOV. 6
2:30 -rh.--The -APA - 'Co. will
present a matinee performance of
Sartre's "The Flies" in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
4:15 p.m.-School of Music con-
cert: The Stanley Quartet in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
CONTINUOUS
TODAY from 1 P.M.

, i

this December.

ILDEST COMEDY OF TH
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NARRATION-ARTHUR ROSS:MUSIC WALTER SCI4AIV: U UEUU tEE K
ASSOCIATE PROUCER JACK MURT:YPRODUCER HAROLD LLOYD ..... U W-OF LIE ,

JOHN
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F R I DAY

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_ ___ ne :____.__._...v_. . ._._
x .. : ' '"'

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GR EGORY

plus FRANK HUBBELL and the STOMPERS
Presented by
ALPHA PHI OMEGA and the PERSHING RIFLES

lll1l

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G. M

Dial 5-6290
Held Over for
Another Amazing Week

1 'I ''I

dCl I I' Ald D 1E1' TI.FE4 A
with Jennie Fitzpatrick, Frithjof Bergmann, Milton
Cohen, Harold Borkin, Robert Ashley, Mary Ashley,
Ann Borkin, Lee Daly, Betty Manupelli, Billie Ash,
Carolyn Cohen, Taja Bergmann, Mike Sherker, Gor-
don Mumma, Jackie Mumma, Larry Leitch, Aune
Brita Ronkanen. By George Manupelli.
MATCHGIRL
with Andy Warhol
and Gerard Malanga
by Andrew Meyer
ADAM'S FILM
by Lawrence Janiak
DUO CONCERTANTES
by Larry Jordan
UP-TIGHT, L.A. IS BUR-ONING . . .

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