100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1966

THE, IFICIIIG.AN DAILV

SATURDAY, 4X~TQBIi~R 29, 1966 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

Bruhn' s Badgers wait Blue Invasion

By HOWARD KOHN
Wisconsin Coach Milt Bruhn
used to be a genial, easygoing
guy.
He'd had it rough at first -
being born in a little Minnesota
town (where the only thing you
could do after dark was sweat)
and:growing up during the de-
But he liked sports-starring in
three at Minnesota-decided on a
coaching career and ended up in
charge of Wisconsin in 1955.
Bruhn promptly guided the
Badgers to conference titles in
both 1959 and 1962-which is like
Elsa Maxwell swimming the Eng-
lish Channel without a snorkel.
His '62 team skied to an astro-
nomical average of 31.8 points
per game, and Bruhn looked ready
to invest in a national champion-
ship. He was all smiles whenever
you mentioned football.
Poof
But suddenly his teams and his
image collapsed.
Wisconsin won only two Big
Ten games in 1964 and slumped to
one conference victory in 1965.
His running backs of last year
looked like they were in a large-
scale retreat (averaging only 58.1
yards a game) and were so shell.-
shocked from the last four games
of the season that' they could
have applied for war relief.
Those final four games added up
to something like .28 points for,
188 points against and 304 effigy

parties in honor of Bruhn and his
battered Badgers.
Bruhn was still setting records
- but something seemed to be
missing.
Psst
Disgruntled alumni in Chicago
started a "whispering campaign."
Coaching speculators began tour-
ing Disneyland. Four assistant
coaches were either dismissed or
left.
But somehow Bruhn won a stay
of execution and returned this year
with new assistant coaches, new
players and renewed hopes.
So far, though, there seems to
be little change. Lady Luck re-
mains disinfatuated.
Tackle Dick Gauthier broke
his foot with a lawn mower last
spring. Three months later and
three days before fall practice,
he broke it again when he step-
ped on a board working with a
construction gang.
Punter Tim Woelliner-best on
the team-was acclaimed academ-
ically ineligible. (And punting has
become an integral part of Bruhn's
strategy.)
First-string Gale Buccarelli car-
ried the ball only twice before
being sidelined.
Gary Bandor, the fleet safety
who anchored the defensive sec-
ondary, was inducted into the Ar-
my.
No Odds
And today, Wisconsin is sched-
uled to .square off against Michi-
gan. The Wolverines have only a
1-2 Big Ten record, compared to
a 1-1-1 for the Badgers, but it'll
be hard to find a bookie who'll
give you even odds.
Last year, Michigan trumpeted
past Bruhn and Co., 50-14, to
march the all-time Michigan-Wis-
consin series to 19-7-1 in favor of
the Wolverines.
Earlier this year Bruhn told
reporters that he'd like to forget
last year. What he actually said
was "the hell with it."
Rookie Rejects
But all he's been able to do so
far is trade in the old beat-up
Badger model which had half of
its parts falling off for a new
model with half of its parts miss-
ing.
Only nine of Bruhn's 22 start-
ers are seniors. He benched Chuck
Burt, last year's starting quarter-
back and second leading passer in
the Big Ten (with the running
game moving in reverse most of

answer questions like that. I don't
predict games until they're over."
M' Offense Tops
Michigan, after its 49-9 decima-
tion of Minnesota last week (in
which almost every Wolverine
graded out 90 per cent or better),
will have the Big Ten's leading
offensive team on the field to-
day,
Coach Bump Elliott reported
Thursday that he hasn't planned
any major strategy changes, oth-
er than some defensive maneuv-
ering to cope with Wisconsin's
unbalanced line.
"We have to respect the poten-
tial that Wisconsin has. You can
.never take any team lightly," said
Elliott graciously.
Barry Dehlin will replace the
injured Dennis Morgan at line-
backer for Michigan in the only
lineup change from last Saturday.
Should the Wolverines want to
switch into a 4-3-4 again-with
three linebackers-either Paul D'-
Eramo or Bob Wedge can step in.
Wilhite Still Out
Bill Hardy will remain at de-
fensive tackle for the second week
in a row, in place of Dick Wil-
liamson, and Warren Sipp will
stay at tight end. Clayt Wilhite,
who began the season as the reg-
ular tight end before dislocating
his shoulder, will once more miss
the game.
Except for Wilhite and Mor-
gan's injuries, Michigan is very
likely in its healthiest condition
in two years. In addition, the Wol-
verines boast of five individual
leaders in the seven major Big
Ten offensive categories.
Bruhn is not without hope, of
course, that his Badgers can up-
set the Wolverines.
But he seems to be less out-
spoken and less trustworthy ever
since halfback Ron Gillingham
quit the team several weeks ago.
Gillingham gave Bruhn one of
the strangest reasons. He said he
wanted to study.
Frosh Teams Meet
Another important game takes
place in Madison today, as the
freshman squads square off at 9:00
in the morning. This will be the
first game of the season for both
teams.
The little Wolverines are a
highly-touted group with an out-
standing array of backfield talent,
while the Wisconsin frosh are al-
ledgedly'thebest they've had in
years' according to Michigan
coach Bill Dodd.

4'
Free to
Colley
S tuden ts
25*0 to others
A new booklet, published by a
non-profit educational founda-
tion, tells which career fields lets
you make the best use of all
your college training, including
liberal-arts courses-which
career field offers 100,000 new
jobs every year - which career
field produces more corporation
presidents than any other-what
starting salary you can expect.
Just send this ad with your name
'and-address. This 24-page,
career-guide booklet, "Oppor-
tunities in Selling," will be
mailed to you. No cost or obli-
gation. Address: Council on Op-
portunities, 550 Fifth Ave., New
York 36, N. Y. MICa. 10-24
SNOOPY
t's a war story filled with
raw drama, romance, guts,
and tears. And there's a pic-
ture of Snoopy on every
page.
$2 atyourycollege bookstore
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

Dr. Kenneth Hamilton is
a participant in the Rad-
ical Theology Conference
taking place at the U. of
M. this week. Dr. Hamil-
ton is Associate Professor
of Systematic Theology
at United College, Win-
nepeg, Manitoba in Can-
ada and author of sev-
eral books, most recent-
ly, GOD IS DEAD; THE
ANATOMY OF A SLO-
GAN.

MICHIGAN'S ALL-AMERICAN END, Jack Clancy, exhibits the form which has made him the'
nation's top pass-receiver this season during last year's 50-14 massacre of Wisconsin. The Wol-
verines face the Badgers in Madison today and hope to even their Big Ten record at 2-2.

Sunday,

Dr. Hamilton

the time, what else could they ski-last year's two top ground
do?), and inserted sophomore gainers-have been shifted to de-
John Boyajian in the lineup. fensive halfback and bench jock-
Boyajian completed 18 passes
against Ohio State last week in ey, respectively.
the best aerial performance since Brush replaced them with soph-
Ron Vander Kelen. omores Wayne Todd and Lynn
However, Wisconsin still lost, Buss, who were to join junior
24-13. In addition, Boyajian had John Kim Wood in the backfield.,
only 22 total completions going His plan almost worked. But Buss
into the OSU scrimmage. His us- hurt his leg in the Northwestern
ual game approaches Hubert game, sidelining him for Ohio,
Humphrey in futility. State and putting him on the
Many Punts, Little Punch doubtful list for today's game. t
For instance, in its tie game with Another soph-Bill Yanakos -
sluggish Northwestern the week will be his substitute. But Bruhn
before, Wisconsin had three points summed up the situation in a plea
and nine fumbles. There were 21 of frustration, "We don't have any
punts in the game. real strong threats in the back-
Even in their one conference field. We just use everybody and
victory, the Badgers merely man- I see what they can do."
aged a 7-0 margin over the Iowa Bruhn Speaks
Hawkeyes. (And "powerhouse" In fact, Bruhn prefers to talk
Iowa has scored in only two of its about things like desire and en-
six games.USC d Nebaka W thusiasm. He has little to say
i's leaky "defens washed about Wisconsin football players.
away before a combined 69-point "We're getting better everyI
tidal wave. game," he exclaims-almost defi-
Bruhn isn't laughing anymore, antly.
but his running attack remains Wisconsin does have one estab-
the biggest joke since Prohibition. lished standout among its assort-
Putt, Putt ed collection of "wipe-outs" in
It's been legging along at an placekicker Schinke. The 5'10",
inebriated rate of 2.4 yards a 175-pound junior hasn't had much
carry. opportunity to convert PAT's, but
Tom Schinke and Tom Jankow- he has booted seven field goals
STARTING LINEUPS
Offense

through the uprights to tie a
long-standing school record.
Three of his kicks have been
from over 40 yards out.
But after his championship
years' as engineer of the high-
powered Badger offensive ma-
chine, a field goal to Bruhn is like
settling for warm water after or-
dering a cold beer.
Run Up Score
There have been rumors that
some of the teams Bruhn worked
over earlier in the decade are
taking this chance to even the
score. (Note the 188 points in
four games last year.) Bruhn, of
course, disclaims any such no-
tion, "I don't think that's what
happened.
"All I can say is that I never
told any player to let up on the
field. I still don't," he explained.
However, Bruhn appears even
less happy than his 1-1-1 record
would indicate. Asked to comment
on Wisconsin's chances in today's
game, he flatly refused. "I don't
-II

will be guest minister at
the Campus Center.
10 'a.m. Service
SECULARISM
3 p.m. Discussion
DEATH OF
GOD
5 p.m Worship Service
Rev. Donald Postema

MILT BRUHN

Warriors Edge Bullets;
Pistons Clobber Bulls

FOREST AT WASHTENAW

By Th4e Associated Press
BALTIMORE--Jim King's 10-
foot dump shot with 25 seconds
left to play gave San Francisco
a 105-104 National Basketball As-
sociation victory over Baltimore
at the Civic Center last night. .
The win evened the Warriors'
record' at 3-3 while the loss was
the sixth in seven games for
Baltimore, ,In last place in the
Eastern Division of the circuit.
A tenacious defense paid divi-
dends for the visitors as two
outstanding plays in the final 1%
minutes thwarted a Baltimore
comeback bid.
Nate Thurmond, who tallied 19
points, came up with a key block
of a Gus Johnson jump shot in
the final 59 seconds to cap a 25-,
rebound performance which paced
San Francisco to victory.
PISTON-BULLS
Fort Wayne-The Detroit Pis-
tons came from behind in the
second half on the shooting of
A chemistry major
named Bleaker
Drank his Colt 45
from a beaker.
He said, "It's more fun!
It holds two cans, not one.
As an experience ..
it's even uniquer."
(4

Eddie Miles and beat Clicago 129-
117 in a National Basketball As-
sociation game last night.
The Pistons never led until Miles
put them ahead at 70-69 with'
8:50, tp play in the third quarter,
and they never trailed after that.
The Bulls came from eight points
behind to tie the score at 94-94
and tied it again at 96-96, but
Miles put the Pistons ahead to
stay with nine minutes to play
in the game.
Miles was high with 35 points,
including 16 of 32 shots from the
field. Bob Boozer, who got 22
points for Chicago in the first
half, finished with 31.
The Bulls had their biggest lead
at 37-28 at the end of the first
quarter. Detroit tied the score five
times in the second quarter, but
never went ahead. Chicago led at
the half 62-60.

WORSHIP

MICHIGAN
Sipp (216)
Phillips (228)
Hanna (220)
Dayton (229)
Bailey (225)
Hribal (220)
Clancy (192)
Vidmer (185)
Detwiler (215)
Ward (178)
Fisher (210)

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

WISCONSIN
Fritz (224)
Loukas (228)
Peterson (212),
Schoessow (216)
LaCroix (220)

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
306 N. Division

CHURCH

Sobocinski
McCauley
Boyajian
Yanakos
Wood
Todd

(233)
(185)
(193)
(177)
(225)
(223)

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DAVE WEIR

8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion. -
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 o.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy'Communion.
9:15 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin S. Malefyt
Reformed Church of America
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m-Service: Dr. Calvin Malefyt will
speak on "The Living God."
7:00 p.m.-Donald VanHoeven will speak on
"God Is Dead: An Evaluation,"
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
Cundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
1 1:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for a Ifservices-Call
NO 2-2756.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-"On Being
Alert," Rev. Terry N. Smith. Bach Cantata
No. 79, special music.
Church School at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.
Student Group meets at 7:00 p.m., Mayflower
Room.
Guild House, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
Church School and Services at 9:20 and 11:00
a .m .-Sermon: "Is Guilt Obsolete?"

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "The Playboy Philosophy."
6:00 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
Cost 35c.
6:45 p.m.-Hayride, meet at Wesley Lounge.
Refrehmentsrand party in Wesley Lounge
following hayricde.
TUESDAY
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Dinner and program.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time fori 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Pine Room. Din-
ner and program, discussion on "The Death
of God.",
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services-
Sermon by the Rev. Prof. Donald Mossman.
Sunday at 11:15 a.m.-Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.--Gamma Delta program
and supper.
Wednesday at 10:00-Midweek Devotion, Holy
Communion, The Rev. Kenneth Block, guest
preacher.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.

* The Paulist Father is a modern
man in every sense of the word. He
is a man of this age, cognizant of
the needs of modern men. He is
free from stifling formalism, is a
pioneer in using contemporary
ways to work with, for and among
100 million non-Catholic Amer-
icans. He is a missionary to his own
people-the American people. He
utilizes modern techniques to ful-
fill his mission, is encouraged to
call upon his own innate talents to
help further his dedicated goal.
" If the vital spark of serving God
through man has been ignited in
you, why not pursue an investiga-
tion of your life as a priest? The
Paulist Fathers have developed an
aptitude test for the modern man
interested in devoting his life to

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Kloudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a m-Church School Hour.
11:00 a.m.-Church Worship.

Cold

I Adb I - I% A in a...P ^"#In^" I

I

"

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan