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October 28, 1966 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-28

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FAGS TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1966

PAGE TEN TIlE MICHIGAN DAiLY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28. 1966

Text of Cutler's Letter Explaining Discipline Stand

(The following is the complete
text of Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs Richard L. Cutler's
letter to Dean F. A. Allen, of the
Law School, regarding the Re-
gents' decision to give Cutler all
non-academic disciplinary pow-
ers over students and student
groups.)
As you probably know, the Re-
gents recently adopted a policy
placing responsibility for non-aca-
demic discipline in this office. In
this connection, I wanted you to
know at the outset that I do not
consider this action as a charge to
me to exercise summary or arbi-
trary authority over any student
or student group. Rather, I regard
it as a basis for proceeding to de-:
velop a system which will take
into account the diverse nature of
the University community, the
need for maintaining freedom
within the community, my own
belief in the importance of stu-
dent involvement in and account-
ability for affairs which concern
them, and the obvious interests of
all of us in furthering and pro-
tecting the academic careers of
our students.
In developing such a system, the
University is faced with several
issues: 1) the need to insure due
process, within a framework which
is legally sound and defensible in
the face of court test; 2) the need
to provide for continuity of handl-j
ing of cases of non-academic mis-
conduct, preferably within thej
system and procedures which now
exist; 3) the need for interim reg-
ulations covering areas of con-
duct presently not dealt with in

any systematic way; and 4) the
need to involve as broad a seg-
ment of the community as possible
in the development of an effective
and workable system.
It is with this latter point par-
ticularly in mind that I write you
now. The task ahead is a most de-
manding one. It is likely that it
will not be completed quickly. Fur-
ther, it is imperative that the most
sober and reasonable deliberations
possible accompany the effort.
For these reasons, I would like
to feel free to call upon you and/
or your associates to work with
me as we proceed with this de-
velopment. I hope that you will
be willing to help-
Our office has been at work for
several months attempting to de-
velop certain guide lines for a
disciplinary system. Among the
considerations which have guided
us are the following:
1) In general, student responsi-
bility for the operation of the ju-
dicial structure is desirable, sub-
ject to the authority of the Vice-
President for Student Affairs.
2) The role of academic authori-
ties in cases of non-academic dis-
cipline, where an action involves
demission of a student, shall be
recognized.
3) Certain university-wide stan-
dards for conduct are necessary,
although these should take care-
fully into account the, tradition of
the University as an institution
devoted to the principle of free-
dom with responsibility.
4) Certain academic units may
wish to demand a standard of con-
duct more stringent than that gen-

erally established by the Univer-E
sity.
5) Professional handling is ne-
cessary for matters of a particu-1
larly sensitive type; e-g., those
involving drugs, behavior result-
ing from psychological disturb-
ance, prostitution and other sex-
related questions, capital crimes,
etc.
We have felt that the disciplin-
ary responsibility of this office
should be effected, in large part,
through the several units respon-
sible to it, and that the Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs should
not involve himself in an "original
jurisdictional" sense, nor, except
in ususual cases, as an appelate

or review agent. Along these lines,
we believe that three of our units
(University Housing, Student Or-
ganizations, and Student Com-
munity Relations might reason-
ably utilize existing judicial struc-
tures, without substantial altera-
tion. We also believe that a central
judiciary group (similar to the'
existing Joint Judiciary Council)
should be maintained, although it'
should be expanded to include a
legal expert, a mental health ex-
pert, and a representative of our'
office. The central body would
serve as an appelate group for
cases arising from the several
"original jurisdiction" bodies, and
would hear originally cases which,

for one reason or another, did not
fall within the jurisdiction of the
lower "courts." Finally, the cen-
tral judiciary would be required
to consult with the appropriate
academic dean in cases where the
decision would affect the academ-
ic status of the student.
These concepts are, at the mo-
ment, tentative, and offered to
you only to indicate the general
direction our thinking has fol-
lowed. I trust that we will have
an opportunity to, discuss them, as
well as the entire issue, at an early
time. In the meantime, I hope that
yoQ will share this letter with any
of your associates whom you feel
would be interested.

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A Great Lakes Carbon placement advisor will be on campus
November 2, 1966, to interview candidates for bachelor's and

4

.Juvenile Court Referee Ross Campbell's
Six-Point Program for a.safer Washtenaw County.
1. Elect a Probate Judge who is an expert in juvenile
problems!
2. Up-date the Juvenile Court and related facilities to
meet today's needs!
3. Keep delinquent and abused children in the care of
trained specialists and out of the hands of politicians!
4. Solve future crime problems in today's homes, not
tomorrow's prisons.
5. Prosecute to the limits of the law adults who abuse,
neglect or criminally mislead children.
6. Keep special interests groups out of Juvenile Court!

*

4

Ross Campbell cares. Do you?

Ir

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