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October 23, 1966 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-23

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER ;29, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE N X1

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE NINZ

., aavi ... a a. .T
-_ +. .r-. . .

Gophers4
THE FINAL SCOR
JIM LaSOVAC
Happiness Is a Jug

E
GE

ggled
(Continued from Page 1) t
Yesterday the plays worked with t
all the precision of a Prussian b
drill team target practice. At the h
half it was 35-0 and it would have n
taken five "Win one for the Gip- f
per" speeches. seven tearful please a
to make your home town proud,
and several stern threats about a
lost scholarships to inspire either S
side for the tedium known as the d
second half. p
In fact, the Wolverines only
managed a puny two touchdowns
after the break. At least this made b
things easy on, the cheerleaderso
who are tradition bound to jump c
off the ledges after scores in a c
gymnastic point tallying proce- t
dure.
A Best-Seller e
But if one is going to recount c
the chronicle of Happy Day North R
of Stadium Boulevard, you might u
as well start with chapter one.
So here goes.b
Leaving out introductions and,

49-0
ok a pitchout and made it into
he end zone on the first bo.unce,
ut the ref said "no" 'cause you
ave to make it on the fly. Vid-
ner then gave it Detwiler for the
inal fraction of a yard. Sygar
dded the extra point.
When Minnesota, couldn't do
nything, it punted and old Rick
ygar returned it for the touch-
own and kicked another extra
oint.
First TD of the Year
Next was that real nifty play
y Clancy where he stopped an
verthrown pass with one hand,
aught it with two, and then
campered for his first score of
;he year. And Sygar kicked the
:xtra point.
After that was Ward's five-yard
atch where he was all by his
onesome in the end zone. Guess
ho added the extra point.
Okay, now comes that other one
y Clancy. This time everybod,,y
alls time out with only a minute

Engineers, Mathematician
Contribute to Technical
Programs of National
SignificanceI

It took Jack Clancy six games to cross the goal line this year.
Six games.I
But when he finally did it, he did it with style. Real class. Clancy
saw the pass coming high, so he jumped -up and pulled it down with
one hand, turned and raced for the goal. Minnesota halfback Gene
Hatfield raced after him, but Clancy evaded any possible tackle by
diving the last two yards to hit paydirt.c
He must have liked it, because only eight and a half minutes
later he did it again. Dick Vidmer unleashed a 25-yard bomb from the
Michigan 44, and Clancy, cutting down the middle of the field,1
grabbed it and outran his defender. Warren Sipp, running an even
deeper pattern, delivered a block to take the last Gopher safety out
of the play.
That's the way it went all game for the Wolverines. It wasn'tX
like last week against Purdue. Not like the MSU game two weeksr
ago, either.
This is the kind of game Michigan had yesterday. With less than
seven minutes gone in the first quarter, Rick Sygar took a punt on
his own 43-yard line, raced past Minnesota tacklers for 47 yards, and
picked up a block from Barry Dehlin on the ten to score Michigan's
second touchdown. And the play wasn't even nullified by a roughing
the kicker penalty!
It could have been. Last week it might have been. Two weeks ago
it probably would have been. Because John Rowser was right on top
of punter Dave Bald idge, and even hit him as the punt was sailing
toward Sygar. Baldridge, of course, immediately fell to the turf. What
good punter wouldn't? The ref, who had been watching the punt sail
toward Sygar, looked back long enough to decide that Baldridge had
back on his feet long enough before being hit, and left the flag in
his pocket. Then he turned to watch Sygar race down the sideline.
That was the way it went for the Wolverines yesterday.
It wasn't as if Michigan didn't have to work a little bit for its
y 49 points. True, the Wolverines took a 35-0 halftime lead into the
locker room with them. But they also racked up a 59-0 margin over
the Gophers in yards penalized. By the game's end they'd been penal-
ized 79 yards, contrasting to 11 for the Gophers.
But Vidmer's passing (he completed 15 of 19 for 212 yards) and
the running of Dave Fisher, Carl Ward, and Jim Detwiler kept the
offense moving all' afternoon. Stan Kemp was needed for only four
punts, two of which came after the first string had been taken out in
the last quarter.
The 49-point margin was the largest ever in the battle for the
Little Brown Jug, which will remain in Ann Arbor again after a
year's absence. Back in 1943 a Wolverine squad defeated the
Gophers by a 49-6 score. Michigan has now won the Brown Jug
30 times, while the Gophers have had it 18 times. There have
been three ties in the series. Before the Jug was the prize for the
victor, the two teams had met only six times, with Michigan win-
ning four of the contests.
The Michigan defense equaled the offense, holding the Gophers to
only three first downs by passing and another three by rushing. The
defensive secondary allowed only six completions by the three Min-
nesota signal callers, with 19 passes going awry or being broken up.
And there was the defensive line.
Yes, the Line. Rushing as few as four men on some plays, the
defense repeatedly smothered the quarterback and stopped the run-
ners for short gains. At. half time Minnesota had amassed all of -3
yards on the ground, and added 37 more in the second half for an
average of 1.1 yards per rush. Overall Michigan racked up 456 yards
to the Gophers' menial 106.
Minnesota's coverage of Clancy was interesting. With about
six minutes left in the second quarter, it seemed as if the see-
ondary had given up all hope of stopping him. At this particular
time Clancy stopped in his pattern when he saw Vidmer's aerial
fly way out 'of reach. A Minnesota back, however, seemed to as-
sume that Clancy would catch it anyway, and attempted to bring
him down without even glancing at the ball. Clancy added 10
receptions to his season total.
Another interesting sidelight to the game was that Paul D'Eramo
had his own shutout in the kickoff department, trouncing Minne-
sota's kicker 9-0.
On the fifth kickoff, the ball was held up by the wind and came
down on Dennis Cornell on the 25, where it looked as if he had a
good deal of running room. Unfortunately for Cornell, before he took
a step forward, his own teammate, Ken Last, conveniently bumped
him over right where he caught it.
Perhaps the cricial point in the game came with three and a
half minutes left to play in the first half. Michigan had the ball
on Minnesota's 19-yard line, and it was fourth down and two to
go.
What would Elliott do?
Michigan had only a 21-0 lead.
The crowd yelled 'Go!"
Could Sygar kick a field goal from 36 yards out on an angle
and against the wind?
Elliott decided to go for the o
first down. Maybe he remem-
bered something from last week.
Maybe he felt secure with a 21-0
lead. Anyway, Fisher, took a
4 pitch from Vidmer and went
around left end for 12 yards and
t at -own on the seven. Three
plays later, Ward took a pass at
the five and zipped into the end
zone.

Sl

U..

suchredas sone as~ 1 left so you figure something's up.
Sscored as soon as it Clancy just runs up the middle.
tb hold of that ball. With btaltfse hntetogy
~the eight, Dave Fisher but a lot faster thanthes tgs
on te eght Dav Fihercovering him. He catches it at the
31-yard line and keeps going to
give Sygar another extra point.
Short Run for "Diesel Det"
The sixth one was pretty easy
to forget. Except probably for Det-
wiler who scored it from about
two inches away-a good half foot
longer than his first score.
=4 The final... whoops, Sygar
added the extra point.
The final touchdown was a four-
yard carry by Ernie Sharpe, re-
member him? Bumb Elliott, who
must be criticized for a total lack
of imagination once again in-
structed Sygar to boot the conver-
-* sion. And the docile youth did so.
One of the most disappointing
aspects of the game was the
Homecoming Queen's failure to
make a public appearance. Captain
Clancy said this was his best game.
ever, but he probably wouldn't
JIM DETWILER have minded a pre-game smooch.
Wolverines Discover Gopher Holes

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Mi
First Downs
Ruching
Passing
Penalty
Total No. of 'Rushes
Net Yards-Rushing z
Passing .2
Forward Passes Att.
Completed
Intercepted by
Yds. int. returned
Total Plays (Rushes and

[ICH.
26
12
13
1
61
234
~222
20
16
0
0

MINN.
8
3
3
2
30
34
72
25
6
0
0

PASSING
Michigan
Att. Comp. Pet.
19 15 .789
1 1 1.000
20 16 .800

Vidiner
Brown
Totals
Wilson
Carlson
Stephens
Totals

Minnesota
Att. Comp.
3 0
17 5
5 1
25 6

Yds.
212
10
222
Yds.
0
58
14
72

Pct.
.000
.294
.200
.240

natinalsecurity'agency"
... where imagination is the essential qualification.

Passes) SI 55
Average distance 5.6 1.9
Kickoffs, returned by 0 9
Yds. Kicks Returned 91 184
Punts 91 32
Kickoffs 0 152
Fumbles, Number 0 1
Ball lost by 0 0
Penalties, number 6 1
Yards penalized 79 11
MICHIGAN 14 21 7 7-49
MINNESOTA 0 0 0 0- 0
SCORING
Michigan-Detwiler (1 run), Sy-
Sgar (kick).
Michigan-Sygar (57 punt return),
Sygar (kick).
Michigan-Clancy (24 pass from
Vidmer), Sygar (kick).
Michigan-Ward (5 pass from Vid-
mer), Sygar (kick).
Michigan-Clancy (56 pass from
Vidmer), Sygar (kick).
Michigan-Detwiler (1 run), Sy-
gar (kick).
Michigan-Sharpe (4 run), Sygar
(kick).
Minnesota-None.
RUSHING
Michigan
Tries Net Ave.
Fisher 20 68 3.4
Ward 7 34 4.9
Detwiler 16 60 3.8
Vidmer 7 20 2.9

PASS RECEIVING

Clancy
Detwiler
Ward
Humphries
Sharpe
Totals
Litten
Bryant
Forte
Cornell
Totals
Kemp
Baidridge

Michigan
No.
10
1
2
1
2
16
Minnesota
No.
2
1
2
1
6
PUNTING
Michigan

Yds.
168
11.
17
10
16
222
Yds.
55
-9
11
15
72

Ave.
16.8
11.0
8.5
10.0
8.0
13.9
Ave.
27.5
-9.0
5.5
15.0
12.0
Ave.
36
Ave.
40

i

No.
4
Minnesota
No.
10

PASSES INTERCEPTED
Michigan
Minnesota

None.
None.

Sharpe
Radigan
Brown
Johnson
Jobe
Totals

2
1
4
3
61
Minnesota
Tries
12
7
4
1
1
30

6
4
17
21
4
234
Net
20
43
4
-35
0
2
34

3.0
4.0
4.3
7.0
4.0
3.8
Ave.
1.7
6.1
0.8
-8.8
0.0
2.0
1.1

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Wilson
Cornell
Wintermute
Carlson.
Bryant
Stephens
Totals

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