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October 22, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-22

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1866

t THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGESEVEN-

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVE1'1 -

Wolverines

Face

Young,

Hungry

Gophers

By RICK STERN
For what it's worth, there's a
sign in a pansophic Ann Arbor
chophouse known as "REd's Rite-
spot," predicting that Michigan
will beat Minnesota 28-10 this
afternoon.
And Grayle Howlett, a Michi-
gan Daily night editor and prob-
ably the only living biped to have
correctly forecasted each of Mich-
igan's first five games this sea-
son, also picks the Wolverines to-
day.
Even Paul Josephson, an obscure
dishwasher in the Alpha Phi Ep-
silon Phi sorority house, says that
Michigan will take the Brown
Jug when the two squads clash
at 1:30 this afternoon in Michi-
gan Stadium. And Josephson has
never seen a college football game
and probably couldn't discern left
tackle from shortstop.
In other words, though Michi-
gan has lost three football games

in a row and was almost booed off'
the field the last time, everybody
seems to be picking the Wolver-
ines.
What could be the reason be-
hind this fanatical belief in Wol-
verine destiny? Minnesota Coach
Murray Warmath, who hopefully
isn't picking Michigan, provided
some possible solutions to the di-
lemma, when we talked to him on
the telephone last night.
"Michigan is a veteran team
with probably the best backfield
in the country. They've had bad
breaks so far but all told they
have the experience and talent to
be a top team."
Warmath downgraded his own
stock of talent. "I wouldn't say
we're even above average in any
facet of the game, except per-
haps kicking. We're a young team
-20 of the 42 men we brought
along are sophomores-and we're
still not recovered from a wave of

early season injuries. I'd say we
have more problems than we do
assets."
The veteran Minnesota coach
touched briefly on what must be
a major factor in today's game-
the fact that Michigan played
probably their best game of the
season last week against Purdue
yet still lost. "We're very con-
cerned about Michigan's getting
beat because it should make them
want to win against us even more,
since . they clearly played well
enough to win last week."
"Our team is ready, too, men-
tally. We've had good practices!
all week and all of the boys are
enthusiastic.,"
Bodily Essence
Warmath emphasized the im-
portance of mental preparation in
college football. "It's everything,"
he said. "The team that's not up
just isn't gonna win. The adren-
alin simply has to be flowing."

1 Mjinnesota is undfeated ,0riin +.to

ClruiA TbrVIT~t 1T YTTTITUC

Big Ten games this year, havingI1 11tLJVl
tied mediocre Indiana 7-7 and OFFENSE
beaten Iowa 17-0. But in presea- MINNESOTA MICHIGAN
son action they lost two of three, Last (211) LE Sipp (216)
to Missouri 24-0, and Kansas 16- Jones (234) Lr Phillips (228)
14 with a 35-21 win over Stan- Laako (213) LG Hanna (220)
ford sandwiched in between. Killin (225) C Dayton (220)
Michigan is uncomfortably close Walsh (211) RG Bailey (214)
to the bottom of the standings, Klick (218) RT Hribal (220)
I with losses in their first two Anderson (242) RE Clancy (192)
games, to Michigan State 20-7
and Purdue 22-21. If the Wolver- Wilson (190) QB Vidmer (185)
ines want to salvage a respectable Wintermute (190) LH Detwiler (215) t
position by the end of 1966 they Whitlow (165) RH Ward (178)
will have to start today. Cornell (211) F8 Fisher (210)
'Feel' the Stadium
Warmath and the Gophers did MINNESOTA DEFENSEMICHIGAN
not work out in Michigan Sta-
dium yesterday afternoon, prefer- Sanders (221) LE Rosema (214)
ring to take a short hike around Hermann (229) LT Hardy (233)
the grounds instead. Warmath ex- Duren (242) MG Mielke (223)
plained the rationale behind this, Kamzelski (234) RT Porter (237)
then let a little of his own adren- Williams (234) RE Stincic (217)
alin flow. "Half of our team is Wheeler (203) LB Morgan (230)
sophomores and have never seen Reierson (191) LB Nunley (218)
Michigan Stadium. I don't believe Newsome (206) DR Rowser (183)
in working out before a game but NSomel(26) DR Bossr(183)
I did think the players should get Sakal (191) DB Bass (180)
the feel of the stadium. Hatfield (187) S Sygar (185)
"They also should get the feel Condo (193) S Volk (192)
of the dressing room," he volun-
teered, "which is probably the'son who is still recovering from replaced by Bill Hardy in the line-
worst visitors' dressing quarters an injury, Peterson should see ac- up. Williamson missed several
in the country. When they were tion though, according to War- days of practice this week due to
math. hudrijr
building the stadium, which is a shoulder injury
probably the best in the country, Deutscher Summing up Michigan's state of
they should have put in decent The other halfback is sopho- preparedness for the game, El-
dressing rooms." more John Wintermute, a speedy liott said that "the team has come
Urged back to the topic of foot- elusive back with "fine poten- up well in the past week and
ball, Warmath denied that soph- tial." should be ready." He referred to
omore quarterback Ray Stephens, Minnesota's best known player Minnesota as "a young team,
who has been third string up un- is split end Ken Last, who is prob- tough defensively, which has made
til this week, would start this aft- ably comparable to Wolverine a lot of progress thus far in the
JacoLat, season."
enn.standout JckClancy. Lswho
You Be the Quarterback has already become the first The Wolverines held only a light
I woulddoubtit very much,"Gworkout yesterday afternoon, with-
Iwuddui tvr uc,'Gpe in history to gain over out uniforms and the atmospher~e
said Warmath who ought to know. 1000 yards in his career, was de- out uniforseand detmosphern
"He worked out with the first scribed by Warmath as being "tall, was one of reserved determination.
unit for a while last Monday and a lot rangier but not as fast as Ho Ho, Hee
the reporters seemed to attach Clancy. I've seen pictures of Clan- An added incentive for both
great significance to this. Most of cy and I think that though his squads this afternoon is, of course,
therm write their own fiction, hands are not as good as Lasts', the oft, heralded Little Brown Jug,
though, instead of the facts," he he is a better runner once he gets symbolizing the long tradition be-
added.pthe ball. Last is slower than Clan- tween the two schools. This will
If Stephens, whose brother San- cy ,and Clancy of course, has back- be the 57th game meeting of Mich-
dy was a former Minnesota All- field experience. Last is our best igan and Minnesota, with the
America, doesn't start, then the man, though." Wolverines holding a 33-20-3 edge
nod will go to either of two Jun- in previous encounters. But the
iors-Larry Carlsoneor Curt Wi- .Michigan coach Bump Elliott e
son.Bot hae sen onsderbleindicated yesterday that no major Gophers have won five of the last
son. Both have seen considerable ncadystryth nmjr six, including three shutouts and
action previously. Wilson is noted strategy changes had been planned shx i4-dn three suyouts n
for a running game, actually lead- for the Gophers. He did indicate e 14-13 thriller last year in
ing the Gophers with 241 yards that junior defensive end Rocky Minneapolis.
gained this season.Carlson Ispri- Rosema was sufficiently recovered The Wolverine-Gopher battle is
marily a hurler and boasts an ex- from his bout with mononucleosis regularly a low scoring affair with
cellent pass completion percent- and would start today. the losing team averaging barely
age of over 67. Haurdy Boy
Joining the mystery signal call- Elliott also revealed that left SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
er in the backfield will be two tackle Dick Williamson would be GRAYLE HOWLETT

MURRAY WARMATH

CURT WILSON

t
i

over five points a game or less composite Wolverine record for
than one touchdown. Twenty-five those years standing at 43-0-1. In
of the fifty-six matches have end- those four years incidentally, the
ed in shutouts and the eight times Wolverines, under coach Fielding
that the Gophers have blanked the Yost, rolled up 2314 points and
Wolverines is more whitewashes gave up just 40 for an average
than any team in the country score of 53-1!
boasts against Michigan. But the past lies dormant this
You Can't Win'em All afternoon. 80,000 will watch the
As a matter of fact, way back struggling 1966 Wolverines and the
in 1903 when Michigan averaged inexperienced Gophers duel it out
47.1 points per game in winning for probably nothing more than
11 of 12 games, Minnesota held third or fourth place in the big
them to 'a 6-6 tie. This was the ten. And nobody will win 53-1
only game between 1901 and 1905 either, no matter what "RED's"
that Michigan failed to win, the says.

LINEBACKERS DENNIS MORGAN (34) AND FRANK NUNLEY (59) are anxious to slam 448 pounds
against the Gopher offense this afternoon. Michigan will enter the '68 Homecoming game as one-
touchdown favorites, although Minnesota is undefeated in conference play.
LOSH CROWNED:
Pep Rally Ignites the New

l
l
4
f
[J
I
t
r

U

CINEMAGUILD
announces the selection of
2 New Board Members
Andrew Lugg
Elliot Barden

6

Try Daily Classifieds

By HOWARD KOHN
Some of Michigan's traditions
got busted up last night . . . or
maybe they were just reincarnated.
It was actually pretty hard to
tell.
You know the kind of night-
autumn with the leaves coming
. down, a pep rally with Fourth of
July fireworks, a thousand or so
people who are still at least half-
alive yelling like high school kids,
and the kind of feeling you get
when that know-it-all cynic gets
shut down.
Homecoming Pep Rally
Michigan's Homecoming crowd
piled into the baseball stadium at
Ferry Field in an irrepressible
wave and then stamped its feet
and even refused to go home when
the master of ceremonies was
through spieling and the band was
through playing.
Doc Losh and Wally Weber were
poet laureates and main speakers,
of course, and Prof. Kolars filled
in the gaps with MC jargon.
Bump Elliott was there, prom-
ising in no uncertain terms that
Michigan would win today, and
the players were there to back him
up.
They were all talking to the
mob.
Rah, Rah! Michigan!
And the mob, with the go-go
spirit of hope, played "follow the
leader" and cheered without re-
straint.
4 tIt was hard to conceive of the
mob throwing cat-calls and boos
like confetti at the same team.

Maybe it wasn't the same mob.
"Let's hear it for everybody who
had the guts to come out and tell
this team we're behind them," said

Oh yeah . . . the Beta House
crowned Doc the first Homecom-
ing Queen ever at Michigan-,
scooping the Central Committee
and its choice.
Girl cheerleaders, a phenome-
nom in itself at Michigan, turned
out with their rendition of Inter-
national Showtime.
And everyone cheered . , . just
like that . . . all night . . Go
Blue! Go Blue! Go Blue!
The game starts at 1:30.

sophomores and a senior. The full-
back is a sophomore-Dennis Cor-
nell, a 200-pounder whom War-
math described as "just an aver-
age fullback at this point." Cor-
nell, a steel mill worker from Clin-
ton, Pa., is tall for football, stand-
ing over 6' tall and weighing 212
pounds.
Lining up in the flanker slot
is a senior, Ray Whitlow. Whit-
low, the smallest regular in the
Western Conference, at 160 pounds
has replaced junior Dick Peter-

rrr
--

i

WORSHIP

76'ers Dump Hapless Hawks

NEW QUEEN

PHILADELPHIA ('P)-The Phila-
delphia 76ers overcame a 13-point
first half deficit and led by Bill
Cunningham's second half scoring
spree defeated the St. Louis Hawks
119-110 last night in a National
Basketball Association game.
'Trailing 38-25 early in the sec-
ond quarter, Philadelphia, with
Hal Greer dumping in 17 points,
outscored the Hawks 37-19 to take
a 62-57 lead at intermission.
In winning their second game
in as many starts, the 76ers gained
a 76-65 lead early in the second
half. The Hawks, however, closed
the gap to 79-77 with 3:15 remain-
ing in the third period.
Cunningham came into the
game and sparked a Philadelphia
spurt that led to an 87-81 third
quarter edge. He continued in the
early fourth period to help the
76ers take a 15-point lead and
break the game open.

Weber. "Let's be 'Michigan men'
and face up to the score," said
the Doc.
r Twisting Their Arms
Everyone seemed well-pleased
with the compliments-confident
in their enthusiasm that they did
deserve them.
It was hard to tell who they
were cheering . . . the team or
themselves.
What about the traditions?

Boston
Philadelph
New York
Cineinnat
Baltimore

NBA
Eastern Division
W L
20d
hia 2 0
2 1
i 1 1
0 3

Cunningham scored 18 points in
the second half and finished with
22.
Greer led the winners with 31,
while Wilt Chamberlain had 22
and took down 26 rebounds.
Coach Richie Guerin topped the
St. Louis scoring with 28 points.

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.500
.000

GB
34
1
214
1142
134
132

Western Division
x-Chicago 3 1 .750
x-Detroit 1 2 .333
x-Los Angeles 1 2 .333
x-San Francisco 1 2 .333
St. Louis 1 2 .333
x-Late games not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 111, Baltimore 91
Philadelphia 119, St. Louis 110
Chicago at Los Angeles (inc)
Detroit at San Francisco (ine)

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:15 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 a.m.-Bible Study-Dr. George Men-
denhall.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m. - Speaker: Dr. James Pollock-
"How Can a Christian and the Church
Serve the State?"
WEDNESDAY, 10:00 p.m.-Vespers.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
6:00 p.m.-Trining Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible
cundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister

II

SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
S1 :00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.--Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for ail
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

i.h3 i /iCouncil
Extends its Continued Good Wishes
to the New Members of the

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at.9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-"Pulling To-
gether," Rev. Terry N. Smith.
Church School at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.
Student Group, 7:00 p.m., Mayflower Room.
Giuld House, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-51 89.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
Church School and Services at 9:20 and 11:00
a,m. Sermon: "Lessons in Nature."
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W, C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1 131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam'
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Worship Services.
"Here I Stand," Bishop Reuben Mueller,
Henry Martin Loud lecturer.
6:00 p.m. Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
Cost 35c.
7:00 p.m.-Program, Wesley Lounge. Bishop
Mueller, "Impressions on Viet Nam."
TUESDAY
12:00-1:00 p.m.-Discussion Class, Pine Room.
"What Can Christians Believe?", Dr. Ran-
som. Lunch 25c.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Din-
ner and program.
NEXT SUNDAY
6 :00 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room, followed by
Hayride and Party. Reservations needed.
Cost 85c.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship. Sermon: "On
Learning to Accept One Another."
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship. Sermon: "Life
That Can't Take Anything."
Dr. Seymour Van Dyken, guest minister at both
services.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S: Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
DARLINGTON LUTHERAN CHURCH
Wisconsin Synod
3545 Packard Rd.
Services at 10:30 a.m. For transportation cal
Rev. Robert Baer, 761-1418 or Tim Krier-
wall, 665-5952.

PR

11

IKAIP IPA AlLIPIHA

COILONY
Timz Pirkie

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron

James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m.-Church School Hour.
11:00 a.m.-Church Worship.

Dave Cha pin

Mac Joubran

11

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I

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