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October 22, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA spw-'RDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGANI DAILY SA~URDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1968

Text of Cutler's Evalu

tions Cutler's Powers Increased
cise of student authority over theirTCover AllNon-Academics
own affairs;

I

HELD OVER
2nd HIT WEEK!

4

Following is the text of rec-
ommendations for changes in
the authority of the Office of
Student Affairs approved yes-
terday by the Regents.
For nearly a year, the vice-
president for student affairs and
his staff have been examining
issues concerned with the regu-
lation of non-academic conduct
among students at the Universi-
tv Thi e, ta niinn h a. , a n n

In order that the responsibility
and authority for the regulation
of non-academic conduct may be
clearly identified; it is recom-
mended:
1) That the Regents specifical-
ly affirm the legitimacy of the
President's delegation of power
in matters of non-academic mis-
conduct to the vice-president for
student affairs;

S nI2) That the Regents recognize
part of a larger re-evaluation of the vice-president for student af-
the role and function of the vice- fairs as the ultimate authority in
president for student affairs, and establishing and enforcing stand-
of those units and functions for ards of non-academic conduct for
which he is responsible. individual students and student
At the September meeting of groups, subject to the superior
the Board of Regents, on the sug- authority of the President, and
gestion of Regent Cudlip, the to appeal to the Regents;
Board directed the vice-president.
for student affairs to examine the 3) That the Regents, in tak-
existing lines of authority for the ing these actions, specifically state
regulation of non-academic con- that these policies supravene oth-
duct among students and student er existing delegations of author-
groups, and to provide a report ity for the establishment and en-
and recommendations which would forcement of standards for the
establish clearly the lines of ac- conduct of individual students and
countability and authority in such student groups;
matters. 4) That the Regents permit the
This review has now been con- vice-president for student affairs
pleted. The existing situation is to delegate his authority in these'
one in which substantial confu- areas to such academic authori-
sion exists. Diverse and often con- ties, student groups, and members
flicting sources of authority exist, of his staff as seem appropriate
and effectively prevent the estab- to the establishment and main-
lishment and functioning of a tenance of an effective regulatory
system for the regulation of non- system, consistent with the pur-
academic conduct. poses of the University as stated

'in bylaws 8.03 and 8.04, and that
such delegations be reported to
the Regents on a regular basis;
5) That the Regents direct the
vice-president for student affairs
to undertake an immediate and
comprehensive review of existing
regulations, under the authority
granted above, with a view to pro-
tecting the rights to legiti-
mate protest, maintaining the or-
derly processes of the University,
and furthering the goal of per-
sonal, social, and moral develop-
ment of individual students and
student groups in their life out-
side the classroom;
6) That the Regents direct the
vice-president for student affairs,
in conducting such review, to
make adequate provision, in what-
ever regulations are established
and in whatever enforcement proc-
ess is developed, for due process
and for the protection of the
academic careers of all students;
7) That the Regents direct the
vice-president for student affairs
to review the existing regulations
and procedures of Student Gov-
ernment Council, particularly as
they concern matters of regula-
tion of student organizations, pro-
cedural matters pertaining there-
to, and that he make such recom-
mendations for change in the Stu-
dent Government Council Plan
as are consistent with the gen-
eral purposes of the University
and the goal of responsible exer-

8) That the Regents encourage
the vice-president for student af-
fairs to conduct these reviews with
a view to involving all concerned
segments of the University com-
munity, specifically including the
faculties of the several schools
and colleges, interested and re-
sponsible student representatives
and organizations, and members of
the administration;
9) That, pending the conclu-
sion of such review and report,
the vice-president for student af-
fairs may establish such interim
regulations and enforcement pro-
cedures as are necessary for the
orderly conduct of student affairs
within the University;
10) That the Regents direct the
vice-president for student affairs
to conduct the above matters with
all deliberate speed, and report
to them at the earliest possible
time.
It is understood that any in-'
terim regulations and enforce-
ment procedures adopted hereun-
der will be reported immediately
to the Regents, and that the struc-
ture and operation of the plan
which is developed will be report-
ed to the Regents for review and

(Continued from Page 1)
room is a matter of great import
for the prevention of similar in-
cidents in the future, or for their
effective handling should similar
events occur again," he said.
Clear Jurisdiction
Folowing the meeting, Regentj
Irene Murphy said she felt the
Regents "have now clearly stated
that they hold Vice-President Cut-
ler responsible for student non-
academic affairs. Thus no other
vice-president could enter his
jurisdiction.

tions for change in the Student
Government Council Plan."
Commenting after the Regents'
meeting, Cutler said that the new
system "gives us a locus of ac-
countability. We now have an
appropriate framework to devel-
op a system for non-academic con-
duct."
Although faculty members were
consulted by Cutler's office in.
I making up the new regulations,
they were unaware that the mat-
ter would be completed at this
Regents' meeting.

"HIGH LOW COMEDY. It is a strange and effecting film that
should not be passed by. "-PAUL SAWYER, Michigan Daily
"BRILLIANT"
'-Brendan Gill. The Nei ' r~
p: r

"In the sit-in neither Pierpont Robertson
nor Cutler really knew who had Associate Dean of the Literary
the authority and accountability," College James H. Robertson said
she added (the students sat-in yesterday that he had not been
after failing to win an appoint- informed of the proposals' immi-
ment with Vice-President Pier- nent approval.
pont to discuss the question of "I think the Regents were a
Ann Arbor police taking pictures little concerned over the ambig-
at campus rallies.) uity of jurisdiction in this area.
No More Apparently they made this move
"Now students won't sit in at so that they can't be questioned
Vice-President Pierpont's office. in the future as to when who is'
they wouldn't have any reason to," going to do what to whom," he
she said. "He and the other vice- said.
presidents no longer have any;~-
control of student non-academic
affairs."
One of the key charges in the _ _ _ _

NOW_
I * 'I'I'I G

Shows at
1:00-3:35
6: 15-9.'00

4

"Devil-
may-care
dogfights in '
the skies... s
devil- may-care'
love affairs on
the ground!"

"Wild and
exciting
with
fighting
biplanes!
bsbig"

approval.
Respectfully submitted,
Richard L. Cutler
Vice-President for Student
Affairs

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new regulations gives Cutler far!
more power in his relationship to
I Student Government Council.
Previously, only SGC could in-
itiate changes in the regulation of
student organizations and the
council's own plan.
r Mandate
'For the first time a vice-presi-
dent for student affairs has been
mandated to make "recommenda-,
I Phone 482-2056
Iq r

Information
A WAR MADE THEM ALIES...
A BATE MADE THEM LEGEND!I

IMA at7.I

^IWN

20hCENU~sents E0B6[ PEPfiI3O MM~ASON [JStJMiAM~iD
Matinees $1,.00-Eves. '& Sun. $'1'.25

r

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan. Daily assumes no editor-
tal responsibility.- Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two :times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information cal 1764-8429.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER '22
Day Calendar
Football-U-M vs. Minnesota: Mich-
igan Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Jean Renoir's "La Re-
gle du Jeu": Architecture Aud., 7 and
9:05 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Pei-
formance-APA Repertory Company in
Baldridge's "We Comrades Three":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. 8 p.m.
university Musical Society Concert-
Moscow Chamber Orchestra, Rudolf
Barshai, conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notces
Junior Year in Germany: An infor-
mal meeting for freshmen and sopho-
mores interested in spending their Jun-
ior year in Freiburg, Germany, will be
held on Tuesday evening, Oct. 25, at
7:30 p.m. in Room 3D of the Union.
Center for Russian Studies Collo-
quium-William Zimmerman,%ass.t prof.
of political science, '"ocial Science Re-
search in the USSR under the Ex-
change Program: Problems and Possi-
bilities": Lane Hall Commons Room,
4:10 p.m., Mon., .Oct. 24. All interested
personsare invited.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its }feeting
October 20, 1966
ORGAN I ZATI ON
NOTICES

Approved: That the Men's Glee Club
be allowed to sell block orders for
their two concerts on Nov. 12 under
the following stipulations:
1) The limit of 2900 block ticket sales
for each concert will be observed.
2) Block ticket sales will be open to
any person requesting 10 or more tick-
ets.
3) Block ticket sales will be held at
Hill Aud. Box Office honoring the
ticket request of the first person in
line at the designated time for the
start of block sales.
4) Block ticket sales will be held for
two days. Thurs., Nov. 3, and Fri.,
Nov. 4- a.m. to 6 p.m.
Approved: That SGC allocate $400 to
the Writer in Residence Program.
Approved: That SGC llaocate $800 to
Graduate Student Council as planned
last year'and now budgeted.
Approved: That SGC allocate $15 for
a coffee hour pilot project.
Appointed: Dick Wingfield and Jim
Benton to attend a forum on Inter-
national Order and World Peace to be
held at Princeton University on Oct.
28-30.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval 'request forms for student
sponsored eventsare available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Christian' Science Organization, Lec-
ture: "You and God," Oct. 28, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Gradu-
ates and seniors make appointments by
4 p.m. of the day preceding thevisits
by the following companies. All em-
ployers expect to see your file before
the interview. Please return forms and
update your files as soon as possible.
Call 764-7460, General Division Desk.
MON., OCT. 24-
Atlantic Richfield Co., Phila., Pa.
-Afternoon only. Adv. degrees in Math
Across
Camputs
SATURDAY, OCT. 22

and Statistics for Bus. Syst. or Mgmt.
Sci.
U.S. Information Agency, Wash., D.C.
-Majors in Anthro., Poll. Sci., Econ.,
For. Lang., Journ., Philo, Cos., Gen.
Lib. Arts, Speech and Radio-TV are in-
vited to speak with representatives
about work with U.S.I.A., Foreign Serv-
ice, Bi-National Centers, and Voice dfi
America. Applications for the only
exam given this semester for the U.S.I.A.
must be filed for before the visit, on{
Oct. 22.
TUES., OCT. 25-u""
General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis,
Minn.-Adv. degrees in Math and Ind.!
Engrg. for Statistics and Operations Re-
search.
Household Finance Corp., Southfield,
Mich.-BA in Fine Arts, Gen. Lib. Arts,
Psych., and Soc. for Banking, Mgmt.
Trng. and Public Admin.
Humble Oil & Refining Co., Houston,
Texas-BA in Econ. and Gen. Lib. Arts
for Territorial Sales.
U.S. Information Agency-Continues
interviewing, see Mon. listing for fur-
ther, informatin.
Mead Corp., Chillcothe, Ohio-BA
and adv. degrees in Math, Arch. and
all areas of Chem. for Elect. Computing,
Personnel, Territorial Sales,I d. Sales
and Oper. Res.
Sunbeam Corp., Dearborn, Mich. -
Afternoon only. Bachelors in any field
of study for territorial sales.
WED., OCT. 2-
Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Hartford, Conn,-BA in Econ., Ed-
ucation, Law, Lib. Sci., Psych., Speech,
Soc. and Social Work for Ins. Home
Office, Mgmt. Trng. and Sales.
Bureau of the Census, Wash., D.C.
-BA and adv. degrees In Anthro.,
Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts, Math, Poli. Sci.,
Psych., and Soc. for Elec. computing,
Mgmt. Trng., Statistics and Mktg. Re-
search.
International Business Machines,
Dearborn, Mich.-BA and adv. degrees
Computing, Production, Sales and Syst.
in Math and Phys. Chem. for' Elec.
Engrs.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Milwaukee County Civil Service Com-
mission, Milwaukee, Wis.-Landscape
Architect I. Degree, specialization in
Land. Arch., Design br Mgmt,. One

year min. in Land. Arch. Application
and exper, papers available upon writ-.
ing to office of the commission, due
Dec. 8. 1966.
Cuyahoga County Public Library,
Cleveland, Ohio-Supervisor of tech-
nical services. Reference Librarian, 2
positions part time. Adult, young-
adult librarian, two openings for chil-
dren's librarians.
Michigan Department of Social Serv-
ices-All areas, especially Detroit. Pub-
lic Welfare Worker I. No exper. neces-
sary ,training program. In public as-
sistance and child welfare. All area
degrees.
S * *
For further information please calll
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Union Carbide Corp., Oak Ridge,
- Tenn.-Biol., Chem., Engr., Math, Phys.
and Stat. majors. Applications filed by
Jan. 1.
Lufthansa Airlines, Frankfurt, Ger-
many-Details now available for ap-
plication by students having conversa-
tional German.
* *
For further information please con-
tact Summer Placement Service, 212
SAB, Lower Level.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS: Make interview appointments
at Room 128-H, West Engrg. Bldg. Phone
764-8483.-
OCT. '28-
Clark Oil & Refining Co.
Commonwealth Associates.
Deering Milliken Co.-Res.
General Electric Co.
Lawrence Radiation.
Log Alamos Scientific Lab.
IMarathon Oil Co., Coo.
Page Communications.}
Reliance Electric Co.
Technology, ic. Dv
T. R. W.--Michigan Div.
Youngstown Sheet & Tube-Prod.
U.S. Naval Ordnance Test Station.

Ean~ic n 0.CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 5:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
-FREE HEATERS-

Shown at 7:10 & 11 :20
C-Starsg
SUSAN 09lE61 -5DES1CRANE WARREN STEVENS and
Deboah NOMAN MAILER
ALSO
Tony Curtis
Natalie Wood
Henrg Fonda
L.auren Bacall
Mel Ferrer
& Shown at 9:20 Only
Co-Starring
LESLIE PARRISH and EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
TECHNICOLOR* From WARNER BROS.
PLUS-
"WHEN FISH FIGHT"
2 COLOR CARTOONS

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
A SOL C. SIEGEL PRODUCTION
t WILLIAM
IILwEN
RICHARD
KELL
CO-STARRING
RE RA WRITYEN 3Y MUS C BY PRODUCED BY
c RhIEC N
MVAR ON , MO NOiltVMICIW

I

I r
I,
rg
r r
I rI
I r
Ir ,
I
I I
Oct.d22 and 23 e
I r
r I
I
* (The Rules of the Game )
rg
II
* (dir. Jean Renoir-I 939)
* French, subtitles. Renoir, himself, appears in
* this delightful and .poignant study of European I
"Society." H ighest Rating: Sight & Sound. One u
* of the greatest pictures of all time.
I
SH ORT: "COPS"-Buster Keoton
aI
r ,
I I
IiSrilwwrnr 50
al
L .. S...tur...day . and .S ...u...da..

I

Feature Times Today
1:00-3:00-5:10
7:15-9:25

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officiallyt
recognized and registered organizations,
only. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
* * *
Guild House, Monday noon luncheon,
Michael Zweig: "The Great Society"
(a series), Oct. 24, 12-1 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
* * 4
Graduate Outing Club, Hking and1
horseback riding, Sun., Oct. 23, 2 p.m.,#
Rackham Bldg., Huron St. entrance.
Gammia Delta, Supper at 6 p.m. fol-
lowed by a panel discussion on "new
morality" from a Christian point of
view at 7 p.m., Oct. 23, 1511 Washtenaw,
University Lutheran Chapel.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance,J
Mon., Oct. 24, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Wom-
en's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
Phi Sigma Honor Society, Prof.1
James V. McConnell lecturing: "Can'
Members Be Transferred Chemically,"
Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m., Rackham Assembly
Hall. Public invited.
* * *]
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Oct. 23, 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.
services, Rev. Eugene Nissen in charge.
Holy Communion will be celebrated
in both services; "This Do Ye." Bible
class at 11:15 a.m.
* * *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at,
Forest Ave., worship services at 9:30
and 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Bible study at
9:30 a.m. 6 p.m. supper followed by
program at 7 p.m., Dr. James Pollock,
Dept. of Political Science: "How Can,
a Christian and the Church Serve the
State?".

2 p.m.-Julian Bond will speak
on the Rand Day Care Center,
Willow Village.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild willj
present Jean Renoir's "La Reglel
du Jeu" in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The APA Repertory
Company will perform in Bald-
ridge's "We, Comrades Three" in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-Julian Bond will speak
at the Community Center in Ann
Arbor.
8:30 p.m.-The Moscow Cham-
ber Orchestra, conducted by Ru-
dolf Barshai, will perform in the'
Rackham Lecture Hall.
SUNDAY, OCT. 23
2 p.m.-Julian Bond will speak
at the Rand Day Care Center,
Willow Village.
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The APA Rep-
ertory Company will perform in
Baldridge's "We, Comrades Three"
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-Julian Bond will speak
at the Community Center in Ann
Arbor.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Jean Renoir's "La Regle
du Jeu" in the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The Moscow Cham-
ber Orchestra, conducted by Ru-
dolf Barshai, will perform in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.

To the readers and admirers of
Atlas Shrugged & The Fountainhead
Nathaniel Branden's
recorded lectures on
Objectivism
the philosophy of
AYN
RAND
and its application to psychology
Begin Mon., Oct. 24, 8 P.M.
Ann Arbor Federal
Savings & Loan Assoc.
401 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor
Admission opening night-$2.25
Student admission - $1.75
Nathaniel Branden Institute, inc.
For descriptive brochure, contact
NBI's Local Representative
Irving J. Ralph
2635 W. Delhi Rd.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48103
Phone: 663-3205 (eves & wkends)

The Gargoyle
apologizes for its
Sept. 21st Issue
(or rather for the lack of it)
We knew it would be a great
issue! We even hod 4,000 copies
printed up. But we still ran out!
We're sorry if you were one of
these who missed us. However, we
do have a clever suggestion. Get
yourself a special three issue sub-
scription to "Garg" for only 75c
(fantastic bargain) and get your
copy mailed to you direct.
Why miss out on the GARGOYLE
just because you and a quarter
aren't in the right place at the
right time?
Drop three quarters (or other
denominations) in a plain brown
paper bag and bring it over to our
office in the Student Publications
Building, or mail them to:
Subscription Department
GARGOYLE
420 Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

I

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a

CINEMA II

. i i
I- - -
fo-l
ivl llR-1hs in , a-Cracker Barre
WRITTEN BY SAUL LANDAU AND R. G. DAVIS
FROM ORIGINAL, TRADITIONAL AND IMPROVISED MATERIAL

presents

SATURDAY NIGHT
and
SUNDAY MORNING

or'(

1'

.U

I

ALBERT FINNEY

DIRECTED BY

R. G. DAVIS

7 and 9 P.M.
r ... me -0...,o

PROGRAM NOTES
WhAis n Ainstrel Sho> come of vo over 40 mov have

the material available did not talk about what we know, and
feared. The Minstrel form lends itself to some of the subjects
that confront us. It is an epic form, an open stage form where
social subiects can be bounced ground and not reduced to 'adjust-

Ii I

,G

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