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October 21, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-21

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PAGE six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER:1 1966

PAGE SIX - THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 1966

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SPOTLIGHT ON VIET NAM:

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Saigon: War- Torn City of Paradoxes

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday, Oct. 21 at 7:15 P.M.
JOHN PLANER will chant the service
with the HILLEL CHOIR led by Steve Ovitsky
Joan Spitzer-at the organ
B'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Hill Street All Are Welcome

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1429

EDITOR'S NOTE: Michael Winters
a free-lance correspondent who will
be writing feature dispatches for
The Daily from Viet Nam.
By MICHAEL WINTERS
Special To The Daily
SAIGON-To a newly-arrived
American, Saigon's most striking
feature is its most obvious: it is a
city at war, something most
Americans have either never seen
or have forgotten.
On the half-hour ride from Tan
Son Nhut airport into the city,
the evidence of the war is every-
where.
Concrete pillboxes are scattered
about the city, and every installa-
tion of any military value has
concrete and sandbag walls about
it. These positions are manned by

troops, with automatic weapons.
Barbed-wire salesmen must be
delirious with Saigon's market;
vast quantities of the wire are
used to secure many areas from
"trespassers."
Paradoxes
But amidst the war, this is a
city of paradoxes.
Children play and adults carry
on business as usual despite all
the activity. Saigon's two million
inhabitants have simply never
known any other life. A large
French cemetery near Tan Son
Nhut is a chilling reminder of the
fact,
There is an expression that de-
scribes the reaction of many
Americans to all this: "culture
shock."

While most have seen slums in
the United States, there is noth-
ing at home to compare to the
squalor and poverty here. The
streets are literally full of peo-
ple whose whole life lies in beg-
ging enough money or food to live
antil tomorrow, a tomorrow that
simply brings another day of end-
less drudgery.
Saigon is a city where anything
,an be had for a price: life, love,
laughter, luxury. It is said that
the middle classes here-such as
they are-are getting rich on the
war. Certainly those Vietnamese
who serve people and their needs
are profiting greatly.
The spectre of inflation haunts
everyone, especially the omni-
;resent poor.

Physically, Saigon is a city of'
compounds and alleys. Whole
blocks have high walls and gates
to shield them from the eyes of
passers-by. One can only guess at
what lies behind them.
Often, large numbers of people
live inside, though one can't know
under what conditions.
The same is true of the alleys.
Iron gates sit half open, but the
twisting walls do not invite inves-
tigation by strangers.
One of the most surprising as-
pects of Saigon life is the siesta.
Everything closes down at lunch
time and stays closed until 2:30
or 3 p.m. All the shops have iron
grills which seal them off quite
effectively; the proprietor and

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family eat inside. Sidewalk ven- It would be interesting to find
dors sit outside, around their |ut the desertion rate from Sai-
wares. Everything stops for the .
duration, even work in govern- gon s police force.
ment offices. All in all, this must once have

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Student Of f ices 2nd ,floor, Union 4
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Only the Americans keep hustl-
ing.
"Hustling" isn't quite the word
for Saigon's traffic.
The French must have taught
these "drivers" well, for they
surely surpass anything to be seen
in France itself. There are only a
handful of traffic signals in the
city, which is itself laid out so
that traffic circles are needed
to permit access to streets ap-
proaching the boulevards from
awkward angles.
Consequently, most driving con-
sists of "jockeying" for position.

been a beautiful city. The pub-
lic buildings are high ceilinged
and equipped with large, slowly-
turning fans. The main streets
are broad and shaded by trees.
Pedi-cabs and the colorful garb
of the lovely Vietnamese women
contribute to the atmosphere.
Yet there is a war on, and the
city and its population have been
distorted by it and the vast num-
ber of refugees it has created.
The measured pace of the East
collided years ago with the impa-
tient desires of the West, and the
tone of this city has suffered.

A

World News Roundup

Boycott Controversy Begins,
Oakland Rioting Continues

By The Associated Press trials had climbed more than six
NEW YORK-A sharp stock points by earlyafternoon.
market rally was erased in a late
selling surge yesterday after the The Dow Jones average closed
Dow Jones average of 30 indus- at 783.68, off 1.67. Of 1,407 issues
H illel Graduate Student
Committee Mixer

traded, 624 declined and 508 ad-
vanced.
MOSCOW-The Soviet Union
launched two earth satellites yes-
terday in a show for leaders of
eight Communist countries linked
to the Kremlin in a space research
agreement. !
First to blast off from Baikonur,
the secret Soviet. space center on
the edge of the central Asian
steppes, was Cosmos 130. It was
announced as part ofra space re-
search series, the first of which
was orbited March 16. 1962.
Several hours later the orbiting
of a Molniya satellite was an-
nounced. It is the fourth in a se.-
ries of satellites that soar to al-
most 25,000 miles above the North-

ern Hemisphere to relay television
and radio signals.
BERRYVILLE, Va. ()-Refired
U.S Sen. Harry Flood Byrd of Vir-
ginia-for a quarter century or
more a towering figure in Amer-
ican politics-died yesterday at his
white-columned country home.
Funeral arrangements were in-
complete.
Death of Virginia's "Mr. Dem-
ocrat" came as Byrd Jr. appointed
to the Senate a day after his 'fth-
er's retirement, was running for
election for the remaining four
years of the term.
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Poet
Nelly Sachs. a German born Jew,
and novelist Samuel Joseph Agnon
of Israel were jointly awarded the
1966 Nobel Prize for Literature
yesterday.
The Swedish Academy of Letters
cited Miss Sachs-who fled from
Hitler's Reich to find refuge in
Sweden-for "her outstanding lyr-
ical and dramatic writing." The
academy awarded Agnon his share
of the prize "for his profoundly
characteristic narrative art with
motifs of the Jewish people."

OAKLAND, Cal. (P)-Two fire
bombings yesterday extended Oak-
land's racial disorders into a third
straight day while an argument'
raged over whether a school boy-
cott was to blame for them.
The district attorney said it was,
that the boycott promoters were
"professional agitators" and that'
they place themselves open toI
prosecution.
A leader of the boycott called
this intimidation.
The superintendent of schools;
also blamed the boycott, called
Wednesday for three days to pro-
test the quality of Negro educa-
tion.
'No Connection'
But City Manager Jerome Keith-
ley and Police Chief Robert Pres-
ton both said Thursday they saw
no connection bewteen the van-
dalism and the boycott.
School officials said absentee-
ism yesterday shot up to 5,000
above normal, double the rate for
Wednesday.
The fire bombings were a fol-
lowup to an arson-suspected fire
Wednesday night which caused
damage to Fremont High School
estimated at more than $30,000.

.3

Ffi# F# Ffit F F'Ft F#

Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 P.M.
1429 Hill Street

JULIAN BOND"
-co-chairmaeof the National Conference
on New Politics
-former Communications Director of SNCC
-twice elected to (and twice refused) a seat
in the Georgia House of Representatives
will talk about
HUMAN RIGHTS AND
THE VIET NAM WAR

Admission 35c

SUBJECTS
WANTED

Three Negroes were arrested on
a school playground and police
said they confiscated enough gas-
oline and glass bottles to make
more than 100 "Molotov cocktails"
-botted gasoline bombs.
Educational Protest
Dist. Atty. J. Frank Coakley said
the leaders behind a movement,
set in motion Wednesday, to have
students stay out of school in pro-
test of the quality of Negro edu-
-ation were engaged in a "delibe-
rately planned boycott." This, he
added, makes them liable to prose-
^ution for "felony conspiracy."
'Intimidation'
Blatant intimidation," retorted
John George, a Negro attorney
who heads the Ad Hoc Committee
for Quality Education.
George estimated that around
700 students went to special "free-
dom schools" Wednesday. There
are 20,000 students in Oakland's
junior and senior high schools, the
targets of the boycott.
Under heavy police patrol, the
predominantly Negro Castleraont
High School resumed classes
Thursday in East Oakland after a
shutdown Wednesday caused by
250 Negro truants and outsiders
running wild there. Five white
teachers and three white students
were beaten and classrooms were
littered.
Dr. Stuart S. Phillips, Oakland
superintendent of schools, said
George's Ad Hoc Committee's boy-
cott must take responsibility for
the Castlemont High rioting.
Phillips, after visiting the school
Thursday, reported attendance
way down "but we hope parents
and students will have faith in
the fact there will be security."

4,
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Sunday, October 23

7:30 P.M.

"JAPAN-MODEL FOR PEACEFUL
MODERNIZATION"

for simple experiment involving
sensitization to a chemical. No
drugs or shots; drops of the
chemical are put on the skin.
Chemistry students not eligible.
Must be 21 or over, and plan
to be in town for at least 6
months.
Male subjects only at this time.
HIGH PAY:

I

I

DR. B. JAMES GEORGE,
Professor of Law-
Center for Japanese
Studies

eg tft t Uat4

at the

PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw

$1.50 for each weekly visit
lasting about 5 minutes.
This is especially lucrative
if you are in the Medical Cen-
ter area. If interested, send a
post card with name, address,
age, and phone number to:
Sensitization Study,
Dept. of Dermatology
U of M. Medical Center
(Please do not phone)

Business Staff

on behalf of the

EVERYONE IS WELCOME
TO ATTEND

El ise Boulding Write-In Campaign
on Saturday, Oct. 22, at 8 P.M.
at the Ann Arbor Community Center,
625 N. Main
on Sunday, Oct. 23, at 2 P.M.
at Ann Arbor High School
(50c admission)

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Sponsored by Friends of SNCC

ATTENTION: FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES
JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD
at FREIBURG, GERMANY
There will be an informational meeting
for all interested students on Tuesday
evening, October 25th at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 3-D of the Michigan Union. Faculty
members and students who attended the
program last year will be present to

proudly announees our new
Junior Managers
JEANNE ROSINSKI-Display
RICKI KEEPS-Promotions
DIANE SMALLER-Billing
CAROL NIEMIRA-Servicing
MICHAEL STECKELIS-Classified
STEVEN WECHSLER-Circulation
WILLIAM KRAUSS-Public Relations
GENE FARBER-National Advertising
SAM OFFEN-Layout and Proofreading

The Gargoyle
apologizes for its
Sept. 21st Issue
(or rather for the lack of it)
We knew it would be a great
issue! We even had 4,000 copies
printed up. But we still ran out!
We're sorry if you were one of
these who missed us. However, we
do have a clever suggestion. Get
yourself a special three issue sub-
scription to "Garg" for only 75c
(fantastic bargain) and get your
copy mailed to you direct.
Why miss out on the GARGOYLE
just because you and a quarter
oren't in the right place at the
right time?
Drop three quarters (or other
denominations) in a plain brown
paper bag and bring it over to our
office in the Student Publications
Building, or mail them to:
Subscription Department
GARGOYLE
420 Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

E1

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As for POSTERS:
Would you believe?
D. H. Lawrence Paul Newman
Babe Ruth MarIon Brando
Humphrey Bogart Marilyn Monroe
Theda Bara Rudy Valentino
John Barrymore Mae West
Shirley Temple Charlie Chaplin
W. C. Fields Jean Harlow
AND MANY OTHERS--LARGER THAN LIFE

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