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October 20, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-20

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PAGE EIGnT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20. 1966

?AG~ EIGHT TUE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1966

Graduate Student
Informal Coffee Hour
TODAY
3:30 - 5:30 P.M.

G NEW SCHEDULING:
GRID SELECTIONS
Would you believerairea live Variety Costs'M'Money, Tradition
horse is this week's prize if you
can pick the most winners in Sat-

2nd Floor

Rackham Lounge

SAE PRESENTS
CHRYSLER'S RACING
HEMI
Technical presenta'tion
with slides and film

urday's grid contests? The Daily
is really gloating over last week's
8-0 rout of UAC, and we've de-
cided to have a whale of a prize
this week for the lucky winner to
show our enthusiasm. Boy, just
think of it-a ride in the Arb with
your girl, unique transportation
around campus, and a great stunt
during a football game.
Would you believe the Daily
Sports staff wil never again use
the phrase "would you believe?"
In any event. we'll stop fooling
around and tell you what the real
prize is for winning the contest.
Would you believe two tickets
to the Michigan Theatre? Just two
minutes of your time and you
might see "The Fantastic Voyage"
for free. What a bargain. Bring in
your entry to The Daily, 420
Maynard St., by midnight Friday.
Have you ever seen a submarine
ride through the human body?
Don't despair. Next week's prize
is Chuck Vetzner.
Minnesota at MICHIGAN
(score)
TCU at Auburn4
UCLA at Cal
Nebraska at Colorado
Florida at LSU
Notre Dame at Oklahoma '
Northwestern at Iowa
Wisconsin at OSU
Texas at Rice
Stanford at Illinois
OUICK

By HOWARD KOHN Illinois in its schedule on a year- more orderly appearance.
It had to happen. to-year basis and would have to One new by-law provides for
Ever since a House Committee rotate with the other five confer- seven Big Ten games per team per
began investigating Santa Claus ence teams on a share and share- year; the other limits November
and the Easter Bunny . . . the alike basis. games to teams within the con-
trend for giving everyone an equal Reed also gave the same consid- ference.
opportunity has been irrepres- eration to other rivalries between Michigan will be little affected
sible. other teams, and the Big Ten Ath- by either change, but cross-state
So Big Ten Commissioner Bill letic Board subsequently passed foe Michigan State has been
Reeddrafted a projected schedule the proposal, to become effective forced to reschedule its last-game
Notre Dame clash to an earlier!
team with all the others for at Wolverines' Schedule date.
least two games over a 10-year The only issue remaining now The Spartans have also had toI
period, is: what does the proposal mean
In past years, teams have devel- to Michigan?
oped traditional rivalries which at- First of all, the new schedule will
tract the green-fisted customers erode three of the Wolverines' es-
in legions each year. tablished series and thus reduce
Michigan, for example, has es- the number of "grudge" games.
tablished 50-year-long series with "The biggest disadvantage is
four teams-Michigan State, Ohio to three home games with Big Ten
State, Minnesota, and Illinois - teams every other year.
plus 20-40-year-old series with "The biggest disadvantage is that
Purdue, Wisconsin and Northwest- it will take the 'guts' out of our
ern. schedule-economically. We're go

accept Northwestern as a replace-
ment for the Irish as the season
coup de grace because the rest of
the conference had already pro-
tected their traditional finales
(e.g. Michigan vs. OSU).
Paradoxically, Michigan State
had originally sponsored a plan to
make all November games con-
ference games because it had been
forced to shop around for a final
opponent in its first years in the
Big Ten.

Oct. 27

. .. 97:30 P.M.

Multipurpose Room, UGLI

EVERYONE

WELCOME

U

Virginia Tech at Virginia
Brigham Young at New Mexico
E Iowa State at Missouri
Purdue at Michigan State
Indiana at Miami (Fla.)
SMU at Texas Tech
Toledo at Western Michigan
Columbia at Rutgers
Mississippi at Houston
Marietta at Otterbein

Can't Buck Tradition
Reed, of course, realized that he
was bucking tradition when he
proposed the change and conse-
quently allowed the schools to pick
out certain rivalries which they
wanted to preserve.
His idea sounded plausible until
seven conference teams turned in
Michigan as one of THE games.
Faced with this septangle, Reed
reverted to a plain, old arbitrary
decision which said Michigan could

ing to have to sacrifice playing in
a 101,001-seat stadium to play in
stadiums now even half that size,"
explains Athletic Director H. O.
(Fritz) Crisler.
For instance, Michigan - which
has the largest college stadium in
the nation-will play only Indiana,
Northwestern and Ohio State in
1971 conference home games.
At the same time that the Big
Ten adopted its "equalizing" out-
look, it also passed two other reso-

keep MSU, OSU, Minnesota and lutions which give the schedule a

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler

Delicious Hamburgers 15c T I
2000 W. STADIUM BLVD.
Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

Everyone's Invited!
Come see the SEND OFF !
TYLER, HOUSE
BED RACE.
from Ann Arbor to Detroit
Meet in front of the Union
TONIGHT! at 7
Thursday, Oct. 20

TOM KEATING, a former de
fensive lineman for MICHIGAN
who was All-Big Ten in 1963 and
now plays defensive tackle for the'
OAKLAND RAIDERS, was named
The Associated Press AFL Iefen-
sive Player of the week.
In last Sunday's game with the
Kansas City Chiefs, he recovered
two fumbles, dropped the Chiefs'
quarterback for losses flour times.
and made nine unassisted tackles
in what he called "probably my
best game as a professional foot-
ball player."
TOKYO'S YOMIURI GIANTS.
aided by tight pitching and two
homers, blanked OSAKA'S NAN-
KAI HAWKS 4-0 today to win the
Japan World Series in six games
4-2. It was the eighth champion-
ship since 1950 for the Giants, title
holders in the Central League.
The Giants got 11 hits against
four Hawks' pitchers, including
MASANORI MURAKAMI, the first
Japanese to play major league
baseball in the United States.
Murakami, who entered the game
in the sixth inning, played for the
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS in
1965.
The Giants are scheduled to be-
gin a series of games in Japan
against the LOS ANGELES DODG-
ERS, winners of the U.S. National~
League, beginning Saturday.
The National Hockey League
season has begun right where it
left of last year. BOBBY HULL!
scored two goals and one assist
in his first outing as he led the
CHICAGO BLACK HAWKS to an
opening night win. The Golden Jet
scored on his first shot of the sea-
son at 3:27 of the opening period.

4
Hathaway: Mr. Winters, how do you like our new
Club shirts?
Winters: Fine. Except for that tapered walst.
Hathaway: Not enough?
Winters:Too much.The first time I wore one, I looked
so darned slim that people would come up
to me in the street and give me ~..a..
money for a meal.'.~..
Hathaway: Pretty embarrassing, but. .
Winters: Then, girls would feel sorry for
me and take me home for dinner. ,
Their mothers would take one lookup >'f1$r . y.. ;.
at my tapered middle and pow! I'd %
spend hours at the table.~..~. ...
Hathaway: I see. But ... .............
Winters: And I want to tell you it's . I %
pretty frustrating. After all that
ood, was too tired to do anything
but go home and sleep.
Hathaway: Yes, I can understand that.
But taper apart, how's the rest of
the shirt?
Winters: Great. As soon as I get some
weight off, I'll be wearing
'em again.

/

*~~ .. ..... . ._

wI
107 han
the fron
Slip-on

>rtage
cia1 !

CHUCK WENTZ
(B.S., Bus. Admin.) of the
Bethlehem Steel Loop
Course has found plenty of
action in sales. He's one
of many vigorous young
men in our coast-to-coast
sales organization
numbering some 600
salesmen and managers.
Join the action.
First step: pick up
a copy of "Careers
with Bethlehem Steel
and the Loop Course"
at your placement
office. Then sign up
for a campus interview.
Our 1967 Loop Class
has openings for technical
and non-technical graduates
(and post-grads) for
careers in steel operations,
research, sales, mining,
accounting, and other
activities.

d stitches on
t make this Po
something Spe
BLACK ... $20.00
)mA CV

4

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