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October 15, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1.5 1988

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1960

national security agency
announces the
1967 SUMMER
LANGUAGE
INSTITUTE
NOME
Far Eastern and
Middle Eastern
Languages

BIG TEN:

oI

Spartans

Tackle

Buckeyes

ELIGIBILITY: Far Eastern and Middle Eastern language majors
(or those possessing equivalent proficiency) who will have com-
pleted three years toward the undergraduate degree by June 1967,
and have at least a "B" grade average.
ASSIGNMENTS: Students will participate in a 10 to 12-week
program of classroom training, on-the-job assignments including
area studies involving translation of texts, and general research.
SALARIES: Salaries will be determined by educational level
and experience.

By The Associated Press
The Big Ten starts bowling-
Rose-Bowling, that is-for keeps
Saturday with the season's first
full round of conference football
games.
Defending champion Michigan
State, No. in the AP's national
poll, may or may not walk off with
the title, but with the Spartans
barred from a Pasadena encore
the scrap for a Rose Bowl bid ap-
pears wide open.
That is, if the two-touchdown
favorite Spartans hand an un-
precedented third straight defeat
to a Woody Hayes-coached Ohio
State club today in Columbus. The
Buckeyes are still smarting from
their narrow 10-9 loss to Illinois
last week.
Full Slate
Today's league program includes
Illinois (1-1) at Indiana (1-0-1);
Iowa (0-2) at Minnesota (0-0-1)
and Northwestern (0-1) at Wis-
consin (1-0).
Since each conference school
plays seven league games, it is ap-
parent that despise a horrible first
half in which the circuit suc-
Tennessee
Hosts Bama
By The Associated Press
Tennesse, which lost its spot in
the Associated Press' college foot-
ball Top Ten last week, will try
today to ruin Alabama's chances
for an unprecedented third
straight national championship.
But the third-rated Crimson
Tide will have something other
than its ranking at stake when it
plays on the Vols home ground.
Last year, Tennessee provided one
of only two blemishes on an other-
wise spotless Alabama record,
when the two teams fought to a
7-7 tie.
Tennessee hasn't beaten Bear.
Bryant's team since 1960. The Vols
were knocked off 6-3 by Georgia
Tech last week in a bruising con-
test and figure to give Alabama its
toughest test of the season.
Arkansas and Texas play a cri-
tical Southwest Conference game.
The Razorbacks, who lost a league
game to Baylor last week, must
win totstay in contention for their
third straight title.
Second-ranked Notre Dame for
the first time since shocking Pur-
due in its opener Sept. 24 may
have to play all-out football
against dangerous North Carolina.
Surprisingly, the Tar Heels are
rated four touchdown underdogs
although they challenge the Irish
freshened from a two week layoff
since ambushing Michigan, 21-7.
Unbeaten Southern California,
No. 4 in the poll, meets a tough
Pacific Eight opponent in Stan-
ford, spilled in its first league
game by Oregon last week.

cumbed to outside rivals 14-11, State does retain its crown.
the Big Ten season is just starting. Illinois is expected to :tart an
Although Michigan State romped all-sophomore backfield against
unbeaten to a 7-0 loop record last Indiana.
season, only one other team in the The four-Bob Naponic, Bill
past ten years was an anbeaten, Huston, Rich Johnson and Carson
untied champion-Ohio State in Brooks-were in the game when1
1961 with 6-0 and the Buckeyes the Illini scored their vinning'
also in 1957 with 7-0. touchdown against Ohio State last
Therefore, a current contender|Saturday.
who finishes with one defeat still! Injuries forced Coach Pete El-
may grab or share the title and, liott to turn to first-year men.
even with two defeats, ,nay get Minnesota, its running attack
the Rose Bowl nod if Michigan crippled by injuries, remains a

BROWN BASKET RETURNS:
Daily Shorteircuits UAC, 8-0

it

By GRAYLE HOWLETT
Outlined against a bloodshot
October sky, the four swaybacks
rode again. Folk lore has deemed
them death, suffering, acne, and
athlete's foot. We call them Shis-
ter, Wasserman, Copi, and Tindall,
among other things.
Yesterday, at Ferry Field, the
sun shone once more as the Daily
Libels harnessed the four sway-
backs for a thundering triumph
over the UAC Shortcircuits, 8-0, to
bring back the little brown waste-
basket where it belongs.
With malice aforethought but
goodwill intended toward all
things that are right, the Libels
pushed the Shortcircuits up one

side of the field and down the
Dther in the most one-sided con-
quest since Michigan State took
on cows.
Shoo Shoo Shots
In an offensive thrust which
featured the pinpoint passing of
Neil (Shoo Shoo) Shister to either
Harvey (the Rabbit) Wasserman
or Jim (Toothpick) Tindall (who-
ever happened to be in the area),
the Libels rolled up a mediocre
477 yards total offense as the refs
tried to keep the game a contest.
Despite the Shortcircuits secret
stuting defense (it employed 25
men) the Libels broke on top with
a play right from Ambrose Schind-
ler's playbook as Wasserman

danced in the open to snare a
right-handed slant from Shister.
Aiding in the down field blocking
was Chuck (da Boss) Vetzner who
was holding a cookie .clatch in the
UAC defensive secondary.
To heap on the injury Tom
(Firer) Copi niftily side-stepped
the massive UAC defensive "front
fourteen" to take the conversion
flip from Shister to give the Libels
an 8-0 lead which they never
relinquished.
Wasserman, who is presently
considering an athletic tender,
could only comment on his heroics,
"It was nuttin', I always play my
best against the Shortcircuits."
In an effort to keep the score
down, the Libels next touchdown,
a 93-yard bomb to Tindall, was
called back because the instant
replay camera wasn't running.
Shister, who stepped into the
shoes of departed (Lovable) Lloyd
Graff, when asked to comment if
Graff's absence hurt the Libel's
chances quickly replied, "Who?",
obviously still mad over Graff's
treasonly pick of the Shorteircuits.
Blitz Blitzed by Blitz
Rick (Blitz) Stern of the Libels,
who has been waiting three years
for this glorious day of victory,
played despite a crippling injury
which occurred when a UAC ani-
mal pushed him over in his haste
to get to the Good Humor truck.
In describing his affliction, Rick
would only say, "Idwon't tell you
what it was but I don't plan any
long Honda trips. Actually the joy
of winning has wiped out any phy-
sical pain. Go Libels."
Of interesting note is that the
UAC girls challenged the Daily
girls to their own football game at
halftime. The Daily girls dilliently
practiced with Pat (.Flinger)
O'Donohue rifling, the pigskin
clear across the news room time
after time. It all went for naught
as the UAC girls declined to play
because they were wearing skirts
and sweaters.
Come to think of it, that was the
same excuse the UAC boys tried to
I use.

nine-point favorite to defeat
Iowa's Hawkeyes in the 'osphers'
homecoming football game.
Wisconsin may take to the air in
an effort to snare a Big Ten foot-
ball victory from Northwestern.
And the key man may very well
be an all but forgotten passer-
Chuck Burt.
The Badgers practiced in private
for this game. But the word
slipped out that Burt, who has
ridden the bench this season,
might appear in the pilot slot.

Si

*

TO APPLY: Complete Standard Form 57
(Application for Federal Employment), which
may be obtained from your Placement Office
or from any U.S. Post Office, by 21 October
1966. Mail both the Form 57 and a copy of your
college transcript to: -

,,CO1 . -

National Security Agency
Suite 10, 4435 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20016
ALL CANDIDATES ARE SUBJECT
TO A THOROUGH BACKGROUND
INVESTIGATION AND A
PHYSICAL EXAMINATION
APPLICANTS MUST BE U.S. CITIZENS
An equal opportunity employer, M&F

WORSHIP

-Daily-Chuck Soberman
HAIL TO THE VICTORS!

4r

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1 679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:15 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
1 1:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 a.m.-Bible Study-Dr. George Men-
denhall.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-"Contemporary Theology"-The
Rev. David Ullery.
WEDNESDAY, 10:00 p.m.-Vespers.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School. '
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister

SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:15 and 11:00 am.-"The Rock,"
Rev. Terry N. Smith.
Church School at 9:15 and 11:00 am.
Student group meets at 7:00 p.m., Mayflower
Room.
Guild House, 802 Monroe, 2-5189.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
191 7UWashtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
Church School and Services-9:20 and 11:00
a.m.-Sermon: "On Knowing The Truth."
Guest Speaker-The Rev. J. Edgar Edwards.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(TkeI +iorn (w e Micra iCvnM

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:00 a.m. - Worship Services.
"Bullet-Proof Vests," Dr. Rupert.
6:00 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room,
Cost 35c.
7:00 p.m.-Program, Wesley Lounge, "Viet
Nam-State Department's View," Arthur
Coll ingsworth.
TUESDAY
12:00-1:00 p.m. - Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "What Con Christians Believe?",
Dr. Ransom. Lunch 25c.
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Dr. Jesse DeWitt, "The
Church's Mission in the Inner City."
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
THURSDAY
12:00-1:00 p.m. - Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "The Prophets - Dissenters of the
Past," Mr. Beavin. Lunch 25c.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.--Young Marrieds, Youth Room.
Dinner and Games Night.
7:00 p.m-Wesley Grads, meet in Wesley
Lounge to go to Intramural Building for
Sports Night.

SayNo
to Johnson's War
with dollars & ballots

The November elections pose a test of
confidence in Lyndon Johnson. Every vote
cast for an opponent of the war in Viet Nam
is a vote against the belligerent foreign pol-
icy of the Johnson administration and the
deceptions with which it has undermined
democratic institutions.
In Congressional districts around the coun-
try, a grass roots movement for peace is chal-
lenging the destructive consensus of the cold
war; in many of these, electoral victory can
now transform dissent into real political
power.
Almost alone in Washington, a handful of
Senators and Congressmen has been seeking
to put the issues of this war before the people.
They must be joined by others on all levels
of government and throughout the country.
This will not happen unless Americans care
deeply enough to support "new politics" can-
didates against the "old politics" of military
intervention abroad and racial and economic
injustice at home.
The National Conference for New Politics
is assisting issues-oriented liberals, peace and
civil rights activists and anti-poverty organi-
zations who are striving to win elections. It is
a co-operative effort to provide financial, re-
search and human resources to those candi-
dacies and constituencies speaking clearly
for peace and a full scale assault on the root
causes of poverty. It is now abundantly clear
that the cost of the war has doomed hopes
of any meaningful attack on our slums and
ghettos. We can no longer be satisfied with
politicians who whisper sentiments for peace
in private that they fear toutter in public.

tributed large sums of money and services to
candidates in Alabama and Mississippi, New
York and California and elsewhere across the
nation. Particularly disheartening, however,
were those close contests in which a few
thousand dollars might have meant the dif-
ference between defeat and victory.
This time we want to make sure that pli-
ant supporters of Lyndon Johnson's war do
not go to Congress because the "new politics"
of peace is short of funds. Moreover, we are
convinced that growing numbers of Ameri-
cans see the need to continue the efforts of
political organization and education beyond
the November elections, if our country is to
turn back to the ways of peace and fulfill
the long delayed promise of equality for all
its citizens.
This is our opportunity to transform dis-
sent into real political power. Send a con-
tribution today to help elect public officials
of conscience and courage who will not be
manipulated into silence.
Please! Make your cheek payable to
NCNP and mail it now.
National Conference for New Politics

4

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:45 a.m.-University Fellowship.
11:00 a.m.-"A Lively Church with a Living
God."
7:00 p.m.-"Dare To Be a Daniel!"
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

40

Julian Bond

Simon Casady

National Co-Chairmen
The Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr.
Chaplain, Yale University

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a m.-Church School Hour.

Benjamin Spock, M.D.
Pediatrician

Members NCNP National Board

. . . -....... ------........... -...P
National Conference for New Politics M
250 West 57th Street, New York 10019 a
I --I- frr +h 'F, r mrinoncof

11

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