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October 14, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-14

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1.1, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1966

MEN
a

What?
TWO KOSHER CORNED BEEF
SANDWICH ES
with soda, pickles, etc.
Where.
HILLEL SUPPER CLUB
every Sunday at 5:30 p.m.
call 663-4129 for reservations

$1

EXPERT
Alterations
and
Repairs
Kwik 'n Kleen
Drive-In Laundry &
Cleanrs
740 Packard
Open Evenings

Demonstration Cities Measure
Sparks Controversy in House

Proposed Plan Aims.
To Reduce Confusion

By The Associated Press
President Johnson's demonstra-
tion cities bill ran into a crossfire
of arguments over racial balance
while the Senate-House conferees
reached agreement on a compri-
mise $1.75 billion bill to finance
the anti-poverty program for a
third year in congressional activ-
ity yesterday.
Rep. Paul A. Fino (R-NY) led
the attack against the demonstra-
tion cities measure, which among
other things would provide federal
aid for massive efforts in selected
cities to renovate slums socially
and culturally, as well as phys-
ically.
"If you vote for this bill, you're

committee said this was "a false
issue raised for the single purpose
of defeating this program."
He said, "There is nothing in
this bill that requires busing chil-
dren, nothing that requires re-
drafting of school district lines,
nothing to require any community
to take any action relative to ra-
cial balance or imbalance."
He called the measure 'a branch
of hope" offered to slum dwellers.
The final form of the anti-pov-
erty bill would allocate all of the
money to specific poverty pro-
grams in a far more rigid manner
than President Johnson proposed.
This was a victory for the House
delegation led by Rep. Adam Clay-
ton Powell (D-NY).
But, Powell told reporters he felt
the bill might be "in serious trou-
ble in the House" when it is

1429 H ill Street

All Are Welcome

I

PRESENTING THREE LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS ON-

fl

brought up next week. The Senate
is expected to act first, probably
on Monday.
Rep. William H. Ayres (R-Ohio)
said none of the three House Re-
publican conferees signed the re-
port because it would drop a House
provision to limit to 29 the num-
ber of super-grade positions in the
Office of Economic Opportunity,
the anti-poverty agency.
This would allow present law
authorizing 53 such positions to
prevail.
Powell said this is the principal
reason he expected it to be diffi-
cult to get the compromise bill
through the House.
Not all of these jobs, paying
from $20,075 to $25,800, have been
filled.
Sen. Joseph S. Clark (D-Pa)
head of the Senate delegation,
said the final product "is the best
we could work out and should be
acceptable to the administration.
At least it will keep the program
going in the years ahead."
Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY)
said he also regarded the bill as
"a fair compromise."
Javits pointed out that the ad-
ministration will have some flexi-
bility because it can transfer funds
between titles in the bill up to a
limit of 10 per cent.
Fino, however, concentrated on
a section of the bill that would
encourage the formation of metro-
politan areawide bodies to deal
with urban and suburban pro-
blems.

(Continued from Page 1 f might be getting white-washed al-
to OSA - but we have reserved though I personally don't." .
right of final appeal to the Dean," JJC had proposed that a 12 man
says James Robertson, associate committee of students, faculty and
dean of the literary college. administrators be established to
Leonard Greenbaum, a faculty study the entire problem of stu-
member of the Committee on dent discipline for a longtperiod,
Standards and Conduct, feels the but Baad rejected this as too time
question of final dismissal au- consuming.
thority will probably have to be Baad's present plans emphasize
settled by a Regental By-Law, a consolidation of the judiciary
Cutler's assistant, Baad, himself, structure into one with definite

*

seems to recognize this.
But if the problem of final au-
thority has prompted some con-
cern, Baad's efforts to re-emaining
and adjusting the judiciary have,
drawn almost universal praise.
Dean Robertson says he is "very
satisfied with the process," and;
feels Baad is making a "real, hon-
est effort" at bringing the faculty
and interested parties into the dis-
cussions.
While less enthusiastic, student;
members of Joint Judiciary think
Baad is doing a good job. There
is some feeling on their part, how-
ever, that he has his mind pretty
well made up about what he in-
tends to do and their role in sug-
gesting is minimal.
'White-washed?'
"Baad has been seeking student
opinion," says Richard Zuckerman,
'67, chairman of JJC, "but what he
does with it is something else..
Some members of JJC think we

lines of authority, probably cul-
minating with the vice-president
for Student Affairs although this
is speculation.
Propose Three Judiciaries

p

At this point, Baad proposes the
establishment of three original
jursdiction student judiciaries un-
der the OSA departments of Uni-
versity housing, University organ-
izations and University-Commu-
nity relations.
Above them, in an appellate role,
and also having original jurisdic-
tion in cases which do not fit into
any of the above categories, would
be a Joint Judiciary Council. Its
scope and structure would be sim-
ilar to the existing one.
Baad is not specific about what *
will come above JJC, but he does
comment that, "Since it is recog-
nized that it is within OSA's realm
to make rules, it only seems logical
that OSA should have power for
their enforcement."

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
.": . s"S:1:'.".'. '.:4,Y:::: a . A ,

I

THE TWADDLER
NEEDETH
The Twaddler, a short, literary-
critical magazine, is looking for con-
tributions from the undergraduate
student body. Our first concern in
selecting material is quality, with,
in very close second place, a phi-
losophy of freshness, significance,
conciseness, and imagination. Opti-
mistically this philosophy will result
in pieces which are people-oriented,
natural, lively, even (gasp) clever-
ranging from dead serious to humor-
ous.
We need vignettes: essays, short
short stories, dialogues, poetry, and
that of the great miscellaneous.
The first issue is due painfully
soon, so without further thought
send your life and soul to a vital,
punchy, little mag:
The Twaddler:
1344 Wilmot St. 761-8682
503 Hill 761-8819
809 Catherine 761-3376
2140 Markley 764-8727

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Baha'i Student Group, Informal dis-
cussion, Fri., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., 335 E.
Huron, Apt. 5. All welcome.
* * * ,
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk Dance
with instruction, Fri., Oct. 14, 8-11
p.m., Barbour Gym. Open to everyone.
* * *
Square Dance Club, Co-ed square
dancing and organizational meeting,
Oct. 15, 8-11 p.m., Women's Athletic
Bldg. All student and faculty mem-
bers invited to attend this first dance
and organizational meeting.
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
Prof. William Livant: "The Role of
the Military-Its Effect on Children
and Youth," Oct. 14, 12-1 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
Guild House, Friday evening dinner
and program, "Slides of the British
Isles," Oct. 14, 6 p.m. dinner and 7:30

I p.m. program, Guild House, 802 Mon-
roe.
* *~ *
Newman Student Association, Square
dance, Oct. 14, 8 p.m., Newman Center,
331 Thompson.
** *
Newman Student Association, Com-
munity mass and supper, Oct. 14, 5:10
p.m., alther William Barry will speak
at the supper, Newman Center, 331
Thompson.
Newr ian Student Association, Art
film: "Golden Coach," starring Anna
Magnani, in color, Oct. 15, 8 p.m.,
Newman Center, 331 Thompson.
Lutheran Student Foundation, Hay-
ride from the Lutheran Chapel, Hill
St. at S. Forest Ave., 7 p.m., Oct. 14.
Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Mon.,
Oct. 17, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frie2ze Bldg.
Spanish conversation in an Hispanic
atmosphere.
International Prograin Council and
Film Club International, Present a
double feature night of two interna-
tional movies: "Father Brown (The
Detective)" from Britain and "The
Householder" from India. Both are
comedies in English, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.,
Natural Science Aud.

====.
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Big or Small
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only the original can have
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A

THE LORELI
LAURA HALFORD
LAURA STEVENSON
MINSTREL SINGERS
AFTER-GAME
ENTERTAINMENT
4:30-5:30
CIDER and DONUTS

*

FOREST AT WASHTENAW

94 *Aliwaw*-l

Sharon Pritula knows the
Gift Boutique's candy will be a
.i reat success atl'arty time! .

dr'e*s,* *'ek oo, $2 0bue0Co
stitution checked wool, $26.00

WHY is MONEY such a controversial subject?
Could it possibly be that not enough relevant information has been dug up
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4

,..

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