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October 11, 1966 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-11

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1966

PROGRAM'S FUTURE BLEAK:
Northeastern College Students Propose
Radical Break with Traditional Education

,11.

Across
Campus

HOMECOMING '66

October 21-22

Collegiate Press Service
In cooperation with faculty and
administration, students in the
Hampshire Valley are developing
radical educational plans for their
colleges-the University of Massa-
chusetts, Smith, Amherst, and Mt.
Holyoke.
Last year, a $6 million donation,
establishing a trust fund, gave im-
petus for a cour school cooperative
college, free from tradition, trus-
tees, rigid curricula, and depart-
mental divisions. Named Hamp-
shire, the school is planned to en-
courage intellectual development
of ideas.
The .original plan for this resi-
dential, coeducational school, writ-
ten by professors fro mthe area
college, maintained that students
could be taught to educate them-
selves under a faculty as small as
50 for 1,000 students. The plan ad-
vocated intensive seminars with 12
students each, beginning in fresh-

man year, to train students for an lowing Mt. Holyoke's lead, changed tionalism, the fiction of James
active role in their education. from a five to four course system Purdy, works of Sartre, a critique
After the report was issued, stu- with fewer requirements and an of modern democratic society, La-
dents from Smith and Amherst increased opportunity for indepen- tin America, and folk-music.
Colleges submitted proposals advo- dent study. About 100 members will meet in
cating a highly flexible academic At Amherst, a faculty committee a house large enough for craft
program in which the curriculum issuedw a "student life" report last workshops and a coffee house.
would have no requirements, and year which discussed the relation- Free universities grew out of the
faculty and student assessments ship of the student to this educa- 1964-65 Berkeley student protests,
would substitute for grades. tional experience. The committee when leaders of the Free Speech

Newly selected vice-president of
Hampshire College, Charles Longs-
worth, said the student report was
"interesting; we'll consider it."
A faculty committee working
with the presidents of the four
colleges and newly appointed
H a m p s h i r e College president
Franklin Patterson, formerly dir-
ector of the Carnegie Corporation
Committee on Educational Tele-
vision, will release plans for the
college this month.
Meanwhile, the area schools are
re-evaluating their own programs.
This semester, Smith College, fol-

made suggestions from abolishing
fraternities to improving faculty-
student relations by having faculty+
live in dormitories. The college is
looking into implementation of the

Movement called a student strike
and invited faculty members to
lecture on civil liberties and civil
disobedience.
Since then, free universities

TUESDAY, OCT. 11
4:10 p.mE-Robert Marx, of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations will speak on "Religious
the Urban Training Center, Chi-
cago, will speak on "The Churches,
Community Organizing and the
Urban Poor" in the Multipurpose
Rm, UGLI.
8:00 p.m.--The APA Repertory
Company will present Pirandello's
"Right You Are" in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-Theo Alcantarilla,
conductor, and Robert Glasgow,
organist, and the University Phil-
harmonic will perform in the
Music School Concert in Hill Aud.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12
4:15 p.m.-Bruce Carlson of the
anatomy dept. will speak on "An
Exchange Scientist's View of the
USSR," Rm. 2501, East Med.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Brice Carnahan
will speak on "An Introduction to
Digital Computers and the MAD
Language" in the Natural Science
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Guiomar Novaes, pi-
anist, will perform in the Musical
Society Concert in Hill Aud.

Ai

M1

plan. have proliferated "in response to
Now students and faculty are the intellectual bankruptcy and
forming a free university similar spiritual emptiness of the Ameri-
to those in New York, Los Ange- can education establishment," as
les, Austin, Boulder, Chicago, Phil- described in the Free University of
adelphia Ann Arbor and San New York catalogue.
Francisco. Classes, which are self-directed
As most free universities the in reaction against traditional re-
new school offers unconventional strictions, meet in college facili-
courses not included in college ties, churches, apartments, coffee
curricula. These include black na- shops. No degrees are granted.

.I

Like

... Get enthused!

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

11

WEDNESDAY, 8:00 p.m.

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Auditorunin A', Angell Hall

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
'Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11
Day Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop-Michigan Union,
8:30 a.m.
Management Development Seminar-
"University Business Procedures":
Rackham Bldg., 10 a.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Lecture -
Robert Marx, rabbi, Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations, "Religious
Communities and Urban Power Struc-
tures": Multipurpose Room, Undergrad-
uate Library, 4:10 p.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Lecture -
Richard Luecke, Urban Training Cen-
ter, Chicago, "The Churches, Com-
munity Organizing, and the Urban
Poor": Multipurpose Room, Undergrad-
uate Library, 7:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA Repertory Company in
Pirandello's "Right You Are": Lydia
Mendelssohn 'lheatre,-8 p.m.
School of Music Concert-University
Philharmonia, Theo Alcantarilla, con-
ductor, Robert Glasgow, organist: Hill
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Antarctic Day Lecture-In observa-
tion of Antarctic Day the Glacial Geol-
ogy and Polar Research Laboratory, In-
stitute of Science and Technology, pre-
sents Prof. Campbell Craddock of the
University of Minnesota who will speak
on "Geological Studies in West Ant-
arctica," Tues., Oct. 11, at 4 p.m. in
2054 Natural Science Bldg.
General Notices
Directed Teaching in Elementary
Education-Winter Term, 1967: Elemen-
tary directed teaching assignments for
Winter Term, 1967 will be made in in-
terviews October 31 through November
30. Each student who has applied
for and expects to elect Education D 305
should make an appointment for an
interview in Room 1408 UES. Office
hours are 1-5 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Winter Term assignments will
be based upon the names which ap-
pear in the appointment list as of
October 26.
Students electing directed teaching
in special education for Winter Term,
1967 will receive instruction from Mr.
Bates.
Psychology Colloquium: Ernst Gell-
horn, M.D., PhD, professor emeritus
of neurophysiology, University of Min-
nesota, will speak on "Proprioception
and its Psychological Implications,"
Tues., Oct. 11, Rackham Amphitheatre
at 4:15 p.m.
Statistics Seminar: Prof. C. C. Craig
will begin a series of talks. Initially
his topic will be "An Application of
Thiele's Semi-Invariants to the Sam-
pling Problem," given at 4 p.m., Thurs.,
Oct. 13, in Room 3201 Angell Hall.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Thomas Wod-
zicki, Department, of Forest Botany,
University of Warsaw, will speak on
"Physiological Control of Xylem Dif-
ferentiation in Conifers," on Wed., Oct.
12, at 4:15 p.m., 1139 Natural Science
Bldg. Tea will be served at 4 p.m.
Notice to Employes of All University
Units: Blue Cross-Blue shield and Ma-
jor Medical Expense Insurance Open
Enrollment Period will be held in the
locations below from Oct. 3 through
Oct. 14, 1966.
Campus-Office of Staff Benefits,
3058 Administration Bldg.; Medical Cen-
ter, Office of Staff Benefits, 7030A
Hospital; Union, Business Office.

New applications and changes to
existing contracts may be made with-
out evidence of insurability. Family1
members, eligible for coverage, may be1
added at this time, including those
unmarried children over 19 but not yetI
25 who are income tax dependents.
No new, applications, changes, or
additions will be accepted after thisl
enrollment period, other than for new;
employes or approved 30-day changes
until October of 1967."
Doctoral Examination for Jordan Da-
vid Lewis, Nuclear Science; thesis: "Col-
lisions in Ionized Gases," Tues., Oct.
11, Conference Room, 1st floor, Phoe-
nix Memorial Lab., North Campus, at 9
a.m. Chairman, R. K. Osborn.
Lecture: Dr. Carl Bereiter, professor,7
Institute for Research of Exceptiopal
Children, University of Illinois, will
speak on ,"Academic Instruction for7
Pre-School Children," 7:30 to 9 p.m.,
Oct. 12 in Aud. B, Angell Hall, spon-i
sored by Special Education Commit-
tee, School of Education.
Foreign isitors
Following are the foreign visitors
programmed through the Office of For-
eign Visitor Programs, who will be on
campus this week on the dates indi-
cated. Program arrangements are being
made by Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, coordi-
nator, Foreign Visitor Programs, 764-
2148.
Henrdik Van Den Berg, associate pro-
fessor of sociology, Free University of
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Oct. 9-21.
Miss Maria Amalia Soares Arozo,
accompanied by Mrs. Cynthia Levin, di-
rector of the Any Nery School of So-
cial Work, University of Brazil, Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil, Oct. 9-11.
Nguyen Khac Hoach, accompanied by,
H. Fischer, dean, Faculty of Letters,'
University of Saigon, Viet Nam, Oct.
11-13.
Nguyen Dink Hoan, professor, Fac-
ulty of Pedagogy, University of Hue,
Viet Nam, Oct. 11-13.
Sadok Bahroun, accompanied by Ken-
neth Adams, director of planning and
budget, Secretariat of State for Plan-
ning and National Economy, Tunis,
Tunisia, Oct. 11-14.
Mrs. Ruth Froland, teacher of Ger-
man, French and English, Jonkoping
Senior High School/Junior College, and
teacher of German at Granna Inter-
national Senior High School/Junior
College, Sweden, Oct. 11-18.
Dr. Ljubinko Stojkovic, head, Virology
Devision, Serbian Institute for Public
Health, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, Oct. 12-
14.
T. V. Chidambaran, accompanied by
Mrs. Chidambaran, registrar, Universi-
ty of Bombay, India, Oct. 16-20.
Placent
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Gradu-
ates and seniors make appointments by
4 p.m. of the day preceding the visits
by the following companies. Allem-
ployers expect to see your file before
the interview. Please return forms and
update your files as soon as possible.
Call 764-7460, General Division Desk.
THURS., OCT. 13-
General Foods, White Plains, N.Y.-
BA and adv. degrees in Econ., Gen.
Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ., Math, Poli.
St., Psych., Speech, Soc., Biochem.
Chem. (anal., gen, and organic) for
Mgmt. Trng., Mkt. Res., Personnel,
Prod., Purchasing, Sales, Stat., and
Res. and Dev.
Air Force, Ann Arbor, Mich. - All
Day. Bachelors and Masters in all fields
for Air Force Training School.
Manufacturers National Bank, De-
troit, Mich.-BA in Econ., Gen. Lib.
Arts and Math for Banking, Mgmt.
Trng. and Data Processing.
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp., Tole
do, Ohio-All Day. BA in Econ., Engl.,
Gen. Lib. Arts, Math and Speech for
Mgmt. Trng., Personnel, Purchasing,
Sales and Transportation.
Union Carbide Corp., Linde Division,
N.Y., N.Y.-BA in Econ., Engl., Gen.
Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ., Math, Phys.,
Poll. Sci., Psych, Chem. (inorganic,
organic and physical) for Computing,
Mgmt. Trng., Personnel, Production,
Purchasing, Sales and Tech. Writing.
Argonne National Laboratory, Ar-
gonne, Ill.-All Day. BA in Biochem.,
Chem. (all areas), Microbiol. and Phys-
ics for non-professional positions in
Biol. and Zool.

FRI., OCT. 14-. and degree with courses in math or
U.S. Navy Management Intern Pro- statistics.
gram, Wash., D.C.-BA and adv. de- Harvard Medical Aea, Serving Har-
grees in Econ., Educ., Engl., Gen. Lib. vard Med., Public Health, and Dentistry
Arts, Hist., Journ., Law, Math, Micro-. schools and seven associated teaching
biol., Philo., Poll. Sci., Psych., Speech hospitals in the Boston, Mass., area.
and others. Management trng., person- Research activity within more than
nel, Public Admin., Stat. and Trans- 400 labs. Med. Res. heeds grads with
portation. Qualify on Mgmt. Intern major in Chem. or Biol.
part of FSEE.
Xerox Corp., Birmingham, Mich. - For further information please call
Afternoon only. BA and adv. degrees 764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
in Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ., Appointments, 3200ESAB.
Poli. Si., Psych., Speech and others.
Inside and Territorial Sales. SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co., 212 SAB-
Youngstown, Ohio-All Day. BA and Cherry County Playhouse, Traverse
adv. degrees in Math and Chem., all City, Mich.-Looking for Business Man-
fields. For Research and Development. ager, Promotion Director. Start June 1.
Box Office Treasurer also starting June
POSITION OPENINGS: 15. Good salaries.
Wheeling Steel Corp., Wheeling, W. Hickory Hill Riding Camp, Ill.-Girls.
Va.-Head of Employe Communications Need women counselors, experienced
Function, new department, need imag- equestrians. Will accept married couple
inative person, proven professional writ- if husband has WSI. Beginning June
ing ability, major journalism, Engl., 1 to end of August.
or ind. rel. Will publish employe news- * * *
paper or mag. Head of Salary Ad- For further information please con-
ministration Function, small to med- tact Summer Placement Service, 212
sized co. exper., pref. industrial top SAB, Lower Level.
position experience, salary admin. ex -_
per. with large co. BA required. ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
Trane Co., Clarksville, Tenn.-Mfg. VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
plant. Industrial Relations Manager, sign schedule posted at 128-H West
4-10 yrs. exper. in ind rel. and spe- Engrg. Bldg. Phone 764-8483.
cific exper. in labor relations, under OCIT. 17-
45 yrs. old. Calif. State Personnel Board.
Management Consultants - Director Continental 001 Co., Manufacturing.
of Research and Development. PhD, Dow Chemical Co.
Organic Chem. strong bkgd. in re- Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp.
search related to pigments, driers, com- Kelsey-Hayes Co.
pounds, inks, paper, soap, optical Leeds & Northrup Co.
brightners. Chief Project Engineer. As- Rayonier, Inc., At Chemistry Dept.,
sist. Res. Director, Project is Jet Stream 2035 Chemistry Bldg.
Continuous Cleaning Concept. MSME Racine Hydraulics & Machinery, Inc.
pref. and some textile industry exper. Radio Corp. of America-BS-MS only.
Between 35 and 45 yrs. old. Standard Oil of Calif.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania In- Timken Roller Bearing Co.
surance Department, Phila., Pa.-Assist- United Technology Center., Div. of
ant Life Actuary. At least four years United Aircraft Corp.
conducting actuarial studies exper., Westinghouse Electric Corp.
This week, explore
- engineering
opportunities
as bi gas today's
jg
brand new ocean
Talk with on-campus Career Consultant from Newport News
-world's largest shipbuilding company-involved with
nuclear propulsion, aircraft carrier design, submarine build-
ing, oceanographic development, marine automation, all
the challenging advances on today's brand new ocean. The
New York TIMES calls this "the last earthbound frontier"
with "profit possibilities as big as the sea."
Learn what our half-a-billion-dollar order backlog means to
you in terms of high starting salary and years of career
security with no lid on your future. With orders up
$80,000,000 in five months, our need is urgent for imagina-
tive men in all the disciplines listed here. Men who like
tough challenges and individual responsibility.
Ask about opportunities for advanced degrees and research..
'We're next door to Virginia Associated Research Center with
one of the world's largest synchrocyclotrons, where grad-
uate engineers study high energy physics. We re across the
harbor from Old Dominion College, offering graduate
courses in Microwave Theory, Solid State Electronics, Nu-
clear Engineering. Nearby, too, is the Extension Division
of the University of Virginia offering courses toward credits
for masters degrees. And within easy driving is The Vir-
ginia Institute for Scientific Research, a world leader in
solid .state physics. Linked up with these opportunities,
Newport News offers scholarships, tuition grants, advanced
study and research leaves. Ask about them.
Get the facts on pleasant living and lower living costs here
in the heart of Virginia's seaside vacationland with its su-
perb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.
aI

SO:APARTHEID-Law and Poliics
Franz J.T. Lee, founder of the Alexander Defense Committee, was born in Cape Province
near the Transkei "peasant reserve." Attending Anglican and Roman Catholic mission
schools he completed university entrance requirements and continued his education in
law and philosophy by correspondence at the University of South Africa supported by
F 4.contributions from members of the Unity Movement of South Africa. In 1962 Mr. Lee
received a scholarship to study philosophy and political science at the University of
Tubingen.
A member of the African Peoples Democratic Union of Southern Africa, his departure to
German saved him from sharing the fate of the Alexander Eleven, Dr. Neville Alex-
ander and ten young men and women sentenced to prison for their opposition to apar-
theid. In Germany he organized the Alexander Defense Committee and while continuing
his studies (currently at the University of Frankfurt) has lectured extensively on South
Franz J.T. Lee African affairs.
4:00-5:30 RECEPTION at GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe St. (The Rev. J. Edgar Edwards)
8:00 p.m. LECTURE, Auditorium 'A', Angell Hall

SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS, 2282 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING and GUILD HOUSE, 802

Monroe Street

4

Hughes announces new
openings on the
TECHNICAL STAFF.

iA

4

4

h. ~Ii

op

IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS

Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Marine Engineers
Industrial Engineers
Systems Analysts

Naval Architects
Nuclear Engineers
Civil Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers

processing, satellite and surface com-
munications systems, surface-to-air
missile systens, and tactical air weap-
ons command/control systems.
For additional information on the
opportunities offered at HUGHES-
FULLERTON in Southern California-
and to arrange for a personal inter-

00

On-campus interviews

I I -INMR.-Ew- I I WN IV I&I-AW1.1i .11

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