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August 30, 1966 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAnr. v.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966 ~A#~U' wvuvw

I £ V

1;

UAC Plans
Activities
UAC means University Activities
Center. University Activities Cen-
* ter means an active, autonomous
campus student organization run
by students, for the benefit of
students.
UAC benefits range from spon-
soring such traditional University
events as Homecoming and the
Creative Arts Festival to concoct-
ing new activities to keep up with
the fast-changing and varied in-
terests of the Ann Arbor college
community.
The inception of UAS itself ex-
emplifies this sensitivity to chang-
ing demands of today's campus.
The Michigan Union and Women's
League maintained their tradi-
tional separation until last year
when the activities wings merged
to form the University Activities
Center.
Union and League offices and
resources are used, as before, but
the officers and members now
work as one integrated unit. Now
Michigan men and women work
together to nourish intellectual
interests, work for the betterment
of student-faculty relations, bring
t~he best in entertainment to the
campus' audience of varied tastes,
provide opportunities to take ad-
vantage of Michigan's cosmopoli-
tan, international atmosphere, and
even assist students in making
plans for foreign travel.
All this, and more, is planned
and executed by Michigan stu-
dents.
In '65, UAC initiated the an-
nual Symposium, a gathering of
personalities recognized as lead-
ers in their respective fields to
discuss current and crucial issues.
Among the distinguished at last
winter's Symposium on the Future
of American Individualism were

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS, 1966-1967
Choral Union Series
(it luill Auditorium)

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCI ESTRA . .
JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
GUIOMAR NOVAES, Pintist . . . .. .. .
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . . .
SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE ......
THE CONSUL" (lenotti) New York
OPERA COMPANY
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . . .
SIXTEN EHRLING, Conductor
WINNIPEG BALLET ROYAL-. . . ..... .
SHIRLEY VERRETT, Mezzo-soprano . .
STOCKHOLM UNIVERSITY CHORUS ...
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ....
ERICH LEINSDORF, Conductor

...... Saturday, October
.. . .\\ednesday, October
.I ltrS(day, November

8
12

City,.....

. . . Thursday, November 1;7
(8:00) Sunday, November 20

THE ARABIAN DANCING GIRLS pictured above were featured in one of the booths set up in the
Intramural Bldg. for Winter Weekend, one of the many activities on campus sponsored by the
U i Vcity AtniitViUV ttai

niversity Ucvescenter.
To Raise Suen,

Kenneth Keating, former
Senator, and Nat Hentoff,

U.S.
jazz

critic and author.
Each year Creative Arts Com-
mittee presents a sampling of cur-
rent and outstanding endeavor at
the Creative Arts Festival. Last
spring the Festival brought the
New Christy Minstrels, Archie
Shepp, the jazz musician, and
W. D. Snodgrass, the poet.
Michigan students also provide
entertainment in the traditional
Soph Show and Musket produc-
tions, another UAC pooling of
talent to serve the campus. Soph
Show '67 plans to present their
own rendition of "How to Succeed
in Business Without Really Try-
ing"," which will be a follow-up
to their '66 production of "A Fun-
ny Thing Happened on the Way
to the Forum."
In the past the Michigan Un-
ion, before becoming half of UAC,
brought John F. Kennedy to
Michigan where he delivered his
famous speech creating the Peace
Corps. Other prominent and con-
troversial .speakers brought to
Michigan by Contemporary Dis-
cussion have been Everett Dirk-
sen, Sargent Shriver, George Lin-
coln Rockwell, Ross Barnett and
Malcolm X.
The advent of trimester eclipsed
the tradition of Michigras, and
made room for another tradition-
Winter Weekend. Big Ten basket-
ball, Skit Night, Saturday games,
and big name entertainment take
the chill out of Winter.
Fraternizing and working with
other students during the tradi
tional weekends and activities
throughout the year are not the
only opportunities to sample the
atmosphere at Michigan. The In-
ternational Committee presents,
every January, a World's Fair, an
exciting sampling of the food,, art
and music from the countries rep-
resented at Michigan. Opportuni-
ties for the meeting of foreign
and American students are of-
fered at the International Mixer
held during Orientation Week and
at teas and fashion shows during
the academic year.
The opportunity to explore for-
eign cultures in the original be-
came more of reality thru the Stu-
dent Travel Plan of UAC. Round-
trip charter flights from Detroit
and New York to Europe, or to
Nassau for Christmas vacation,
have been initiated and priced to
fit the student's budget. The Stu-
dent Travel Committee even pro-
vides ID cards which entitle stu-
dents to special rates while abroad.
For those who cannot leave
campus during the year, the So-
cial Committee -provides activi-
ties all through the year to take
the pressure out of the trimester
with free exam week movies, All-
Campus Mixers, and MUFUN-
f when Michigan women make bil-
liards a coed game.
Besides serviceto the campus
at large, UAC offers to the indi-
vidual an opportunity to make his
college days varied and rich. Tal-
ents and interests covering a broad
spectrum from the creative to the
V UAC a vital and functioning part
business-like combine to make
of Michigan.
The UAC mass meeting in the
Fall, or a visit to the UAC of-
fices on the second floor of the
Michigan Union may indicate your
place on Michigan's challenging,
ever-changing campus.

By MARTHA WOLFGANG
As every Ann Arbor student
quickly realizes, money is one of
the basic problems, on the Univer-
sity of Michigan campus. One only'
has to listen to comments about
the higher prices recently put into
effect at the MUG (Michigan Un-
ion Grill) to realize the normal
students' sensitivity in this most
delicate area. But the student who
is forced to work his way through
school is bound to feel the infla-
tionary pressure most frequently.
In 1964, a group of students at
the University decided it was time
to do something about the high
prices and low wages which pre-
vail in Ann Arbor.
The University of Michigan Stu-
dent Employes Union was formed
to promote ways to raise wages
and lower costs. All with the same
goal in mind, to give the Ann Ar-
bor student more money.
The UMSEU is not strictly a
union in the George Meany sense
of the word. It is more a loose
organization of students who are
interested in their own, and other
students' economic welfare. The
group was founded on four basic
principles:
0Students should not be forced
to pay the exloitative prices found
in most Ann Arbor stores.
0 There is de facto financial'
discrimination at this University
where an academic elite is an eco-
nomic elite and the poor are not
given a chance.
* The present sales taxes are
regressive, falling most heavily on
the poor.
0 The University presently con-
sists of students from higher in-
come families. The University
community needs students from
all economic levels to change its
narrow scope.
Now in its third year UMSEU
has had great success with the,
practical implications of its phi-
losophy. When the group was
formed, student employes received
$1 an hour.
In 1965, the University approved
a $1.25 minimum wage for stu-
dent employes.
As evidence of further success,
the Regents announced this sum-
mer that allotments were made in
the 1966-67 budget to increase the
minimum per hour wage from
$1.25 to $1.40 per hour.
One of the most significant
trends on campus this year was
the drive for unionization among
the University's non - academic
employes. This has been concur-

rent with the rise in the organi-
zation of public employes through-
out the state, including many of
the state-supported universities
and colleges.
The student union has pledged
its support to the unions trying
to organize these workers. Student
leaders felt that there future was
closely tied with that of other
University employes. This winter
they joined forces with the
American Federation of State and
County Municipal Employes to
help o r g a n i z e nor-academic

z Wrks
O Wages
workers. In return the union, an
affiliate of the American Federa-
tion of Labor will back the
UMSEU in its demands.
The UMSEU is unique in the
area of student activism. It is the
first student union to be formed
at any college. It has also refused
to narrow its scope to purely stu-
dents, but has expanded its in-
terests to full-time employes as
well. It is concerned with the eco-
nomic welfare of all the students,
and those affected by the infla-
tionary prices in Ann Arbor.

SEASON TICKETS: $25.00-$20.00-$17.00-$141.00-$12.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: $5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-
$2.50-$1.50 (Counter sale begins September 10)
ADDED OPERA PERFORMANCE
"LA TRAVIATA" (Verdi) . ..... New York City Opera Company
(8:00 p.m.) Saturday, November 19
Extra Series
(in hill Auditorium.)
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ..................(2:30) Sunday, October 9
JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
EMIL GILELS, Pianist . ... ................ .. .. . . Iuesday, November 8
"TOSCA" (Puccini) ......................... .(2:5-0) Sunday, November 20
New York City Opera Company
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . .. . . . .. ..(2:30) Sunday, February 26
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor
JOSE GRECO AND SPANISH DANCE COMPANY.. .... .. . . . Vednesday, March 8
SEASON TICKETS: $12.50-$10.00-$8.30-$7.00-O.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: $5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-2.50-t$1.50
(Counter sale begins September 10)
Chamber Arts Series.
(in Rackham Auditorium)
CHAMBER SYMPHONY OF PHILADELPIHIA.. ........ .Saturday, September 24
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Conductor
.MOSCOW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA . ... .... ..... . . Saturday, October 22
RUDOLF BARSHAI, Conductor
CHRISTIAN FERRAS, violinist . . .... . . .......... ...Nonday, November 14
MUSIC FROM' MARLBORO............................. Monday, January 30
*ANDRES SEGOVIA, Guitarist ...................... ..*Tuesday, February 28
JACQUELINE DU PRE, Cellist, and .. .................. Monday, March 20
STEPHEN BISHOP, Pianist
BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS..............(2:30) Sunday, April 9
Second performance scheduled on following evening: Moscow Chamber Orchestra, Oct. 23;
Segovia, Mar. 1
TICKETS: Telephone or write before ordering for any concert in Chamber Arts Series.
Fifth(Annual Dance Festival
(in hill Auditorium)

(2:30) Sunday, January
..Saturday, February
........Monday, March
........Thursday, April
..........Saturday, April

8
4
13
6
8

V

THE DOOR IS ALWAYS OPEN at the office of the University
of Michigan Student Economic Union as the organization strives
to expand its membership in order to achieve a more effective
voice within the University community.

Only,

a hole in the wall

But you wil I like the prices
STUDGNT BOOK SRVICE

1215 South U

761-0700

I# - = - ----- ---- i

HOSHO NOH TROUPE, from Tokyo .....................Monday, October
ROBERT JOFFREY BALLET . . ..... .... .... . ..... . . ednesday, October
FIESTA MEXICANA ........................ ........Saturday, October
SERIES TICKETS: $8.00-$6.00-$5.00
SINGLE PERFORMANCES: $4.00-$3.00-$2.00
Christmas Mu'sic

24
26
29

U

THDE MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB

"MESSIAH" (Handel)-Three Performances ............Friday,
(Hill Auditorium) Saturday,
2:30) Sunday,

December
December
December

2
3
4

TICKETS: $2.50-$2.00-$1.50--1.00 (Counter sale begins October 3).
"PLAY OF DANIEL"-Three performances . . . . . . . . .Thursday, December 8
(First Methodist Church Sanctuary) Friday, December 9
12th Century Musical Production by Saturday, December 10
New York Pro Musica, Company of 34
TICKETS: $5.00-$4.00-$3.00 (counter sale begins October 3).
Chamber Music Festival
(in Rackhain Auditorium)
BORODIN QUARTET (from Moscow). ................ Friday, February 17
STOCKHOLM KYNDEL STRING QUARTET, ...... . .........Saturday, February 18
with PER-OLOF JOHNSON, Guitarist
TRIO ITALIANO D'ARCHI..... ..... ................(2:30) Sunday, February 19

55:91 91

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