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October 06, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. OCTOBER 6.1966

Canadian Public

Accepts

Expatriates

(Continued from Page 1) laws he liked and defied the ones
woman explained that she had he didn't. Why you couldn't even
gone to see "Don Giovanni" at the run a fraternity unless everyone
Stratford, Ontario, drama festival, went along with majority deci-

BEAT
STATE

CHRIST AS EDUCATOR
DR. THOMAS GWALTNEY
Associate Professor of Education at
Eastern Michigan University

A

'Who's 'Don Giovanni',"? asked
one interrogator suspiciously.,
Still, the amount of pressure on
the draft-dodgers and their friends
is minimal in Canada. The U.S.
expatriates point out that the ab-
sence of a Canadian draft gives
them far more freedom.
"Everyone thinks that because
the United States is a democracy,"
says one expatriate, "that we are
obliged to follow all its laws. But
that's not true. Simply because the
draft law was democratically pass-
ed doesn't mean we should be pro-
hibited from going against it."
Gen. Hershey disagrees. "Con-
gress never took notice of political
reasons for wanting to stay out of
the Army. You couldn't run a
democracy if everyone obeyed the

Still Hershey is not dismayed by
the spector of young men leaving
the country to avoid the draft.
"This isn't anything new," he
explains. "There's always been
people who've left their country to
avoid conscription. The history
books tell us that many of the
Imid-l9th century immigrants to
the U.S. were leaving central
IEuropean countries to escape com-
pulsory service. And a lot of them
became fine citizens here."
The Selective Service director
contends that American conscrip-
tiion "p r o v i d e s the military
strength to protect Canada and
keep it draft free. As long as you've
got a big brother around you don't
have to learn how to box."

7:30 p.m.
11l31 Church St.

*Fri. Oct. 7
Ann Arbor

Sponsored by the Baptist Student Union

F

$

RECEIVING A DEGREE ?

I

4

IN DECEMBER ?

IN MAY ?

r' talked to him. I said "Let the
GOVERNMENT worry about
MORALITY! ALL YOU have
to do is burn the villages!" But
he wouldn't listen. He'd just
start yelling about HITLER.
His father talked to him. He
said "Let the Government wor-
ry about RESPONSIBILITY!
ALL YOU have to do is drop
the bombs!" But it was no use.
He'd just start yelling about
WARSAW.
His teacher talked to him. He
said "Let the GOVERNMENT
worry about NATIONAL GUILT!
ALL YOU have to do is gun

down the silly peasants!" But
he paid no attention. He'd just
start yelling about BELSEN.
Our minister talked to him. He
said "Let the GOVERNMENT
worry about HUMAN DIGNI-
TY! ALL YOU have to do is
NAPALM the women and chil-
dren!" But it had no effect. He'd
just start yelling about the
NUREMBERG TRIALS.
So the day his draft card arriv-
ed he left for CANADA! He's
living up there now in some
place called YORTVILLE or
something!

I

U'

DIDN'T

RAISE
MY BOY
.TO BE
A
CANADIAN!

Reprinted with permission
Daily star-Barry Base.

of Toronto

© JOHN NEVER OF NORW~CN. NC,
N 9 1

We,
The Men of Ta u Cha pte r
PH I KAPPA TA U
Michigan Wil Wreck
And, in the light of this knowledge,
we have wagered a skin with our
Alfalfa chapter at the Harvard of
Horticulture.
And we now call upon all other
fraternities at Michigan who are also

IN AUGUST?
BUT IT W IL LGET TH ER EONLY I F YOU
MAKE A SITTING APPOINTMENT NOW!
y Our photographers will take pictures only
through this week.
Make Your Appointment NOW at the
MICHIIGANENSIAN Sales Booth on the Diag
$2.00 Sitting Fee Payable
As You Make Your Appointment.
While You're There, Order Your 'ENS IAN!
$5.00 NOW-Bu the Price Will Be Going Up.
MICHIGANENSIAN'67-A UNIQUE YEARBOOK

(shudder)

represented at Moo U. to

back our Wolverines sirmilarly-and tol
acknowledge that faith here.
We await the deluge .. .
GO BLUE!

V

L

LI

/

At)

Miss J sets a colorful pace

t hot's "in" retreats to hip-level
riot of color, a swirl of a skirt

4

- ni prices
Barometer falling .., this John Meyer Ba! Coat,
spirdilycut, immaculately tailored in imperturbable
Dacron*polyeste-ndraotn, and acolors that sing in the rai $2.
in shetland $18. The easy-going A-line skirt in district checks $15.
Shoulder bag inrshetland and leather $15. in red oak, barley,
hickory, spruce, heather, skipper and ginger.

.completely tuned in on the tempo of
today. Orlon~sweaters, sizes 34-40
shorty wool skirts, sizes 5-13.
Te new brights: navy, green, orange.
'~ '~'A. Poo r-girl. 10.00 A-line. 12.00
B. Str ipe pullov er. 7.00
44TIrum pet sk irt. 12.00
C. T ur tle-nec k. 8.00
Color-matched safari skirt.
Navy or turquoise. 12.00
Jaobon

40Mt MEYER
It's GRHA'S

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