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October 06, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-06

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PAGE TWO

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER G, 1966

:...:.*

PAG TO HEMICIGN AIY TURDA, CTOER6_.6

THEATRE
Student Laboratory Theatre
Succeeds with 'The Creditors'

FILMS

CT A RTC

li

Earth'; Silent Celluloid Poem'

A' '3 ui
FRIDAY r

STARTS
FRIDAY

By JOHN FRANCIS PERKIN
The Student Laboratory Theatre
opened its fall season yesterday
with a production of Strindberg's,
"The Creditors," a strongly auto-
biographical one-act play.
This presentation does great
credit to the group of student
volunteers who acted, directed and

staged it. The laboratory theatre,
an organization only loosely con-
nected with the speech depart-
ment, showed great professional-
ism in this production.
Peter Lembert, as Gustav, first
husband of the faithless woman
Tekla, injected great subtlety into
his performance of a man seeking

Black Panther Party Failing
In Lowndes county Election

HAYNESVILLE, Ala. UP) - Ap-
peals for "black power" may go
unheeded in the Nov. 8 election in
Lowndes County, where Stokely
Carmichael f i r s t experimented
with organizing Negroes into a
third political party.
Even though Negroes have a
sizable voting majority, none of
the seven Negroes running for
county office as candidates of the
Black Panther party is given much
chance of election.
White officials predict, hopeful-
ly, that many Negro voters, par-
ticularly the older ones, will reject
the Black Panther party, started
A Across.
Campuis
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5
4:15 p.m.-Bruce Carlson of the
anatomy department will deliver
a speech on the "Exchange Scient-
ist's View of the USSR" in Room
201 of the East Medical Bldg.
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory
Theatre Company will perform in
"Three Mysteries With Two.
Clowns" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
THURSDAY, OCT. 6 -
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Dovzhenko's
"Earth" in the Architecture Aud.
7:30 p.m.--The Office of Reli-
gious Affairs will present Edward
Crowther, bishop of Kimberley and
Kurman in South Africa speaking
on "South Africa: The Church and
Apartheid" in the Multipurpose
Room of the UGLI.
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory
Theatre Company will present
"Three Mysteries With Two
Clowns" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
FRIDAY, OCT.7
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present Dovzhenko's
"Earth" in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The APA Repertory
Theatre Company will present
."Three Mysteries W ith Two
Clowns" in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.

by Carmichael months before het
became chairman of the Student
Nonviolent Coordinating Commit-
tee, and made "black power" aj
national issue.
Atty. Gen. Richmond Flowers,
who won the support of most Ne-
groes in the Democratic primary9
for governor last May 3, said he
has found little evidence that Ne-
groes are williing to challenge the
long-standing tradition of white
supremacy.
White Domination
Flowers saw significance in the,
failure of the two Negro-domi-I
nated juries to vote against white'
defendants accused of civil rights
violence. The verdicts of those'
juries reflect continuing domina-
tion of the county by the white
minority, said Flowers, who lost
the gubernatorial race.
All 'eight Negroes chosen to the
jury to try Ku Klux Klansman
Eugene Thomas of killing a civil
rights worker decided on Sept. 27
that he was innocent;
Two weeks earlier, a county
grand jury of 11 Negroes and 7
white men voted unanimously
against returning a more serious;
charge against Thomas L. Cole-
man, a onetime special deputy,
sheriff charged with assault and
battery in the shooting of a civil
rights volunteer. The lesser charge
subsequently was dismissed..
Verdicts Mean Trouble
"This spells trouble for the
Black Panther candidates," said
Flowers. "I think the attitude re-
flected in these jury verdicts will
have a substantial effect on the
election."
If every eligible Negro in the
county votes for the Negro can-
didates next month, they will win.
There are 2,800 Negro voters and
2;300 registered whites..
When the Back Panther party
nominated candidates at a mass
meeting in Haynesville last May
3, only 821 Negroes attended.
Negro candidates are running
for sheriff, tax assessor, tax col-,
lector, coroner and three seats on
the County School Board. Their
opponents, all Democrats, are the
incumbent office holders.

vengeance upon the woman he has1
helped to create. Rudolf Berger in
the role of Adolf gives a vivid in-
terpretation of an artist sappedj
of his intellectual vigor and his}
manhood througn his marriage to
the woman Tekla. Lembert as the1
inquisitor and Berger as his al-
ready defeated victim provide a
powerful dramatic force to Strind-
berg's picture of man as he is de-
stroyed by woman.
Destroyer
Leah Caper as Tekla, the de-;
stroyer, succeeds in the difficult}
task of portraying the voracious
and faithless wife without making
her an object of moral judge- j
ments; she is what she is. Thus I
the presentation is a moving and
forceful statement of the play-
wright's theme.
The director, Beth Rankin, has1
so guided the performance as to
avoid mitigation of its dramatic
impact by making the play a per-
lod piece. Without any attempt at}
updating or wasted introduction of{
modernisms, she makes it striking-
ly plain how timely is the work of
the playwright himself.
Deserves Attention
The laboratory theatre has de-
monstrated admirably that it de-
serves the same attention given to3
other, better publicized produc-
tions. The organization more thanI
justifies its existence as a largely
independent student group, with
student stage managers, designers,
and stage hands devoting their
extracurricular time to then real-
ization of the productions, which
are performed at the Arena
Theatre in the Frieze Building,
with no admission charge.
The only supervision given to
these productions is indirect, in
that the directors are members of
a graduate class; however, control
over this sphere of production is
by private suggestion from the
faculty. A great deal of intimacy
is added by the fact that the
Arena Theatre in which perform-
ances are giver is in the form of
a theatre in the round.
Further presentation scheduled
in this series are: "Imprompty," by
Mosel; "The Outlaw," another
Strindberg creation; "Herr Pun-
tila Und Sein Knecht Matti" by
Brecht; "The Vigilent" by Cer-
vantes and two original one-act
plays. Performances are on Wed-
nesdays and Thursdays, at 4:10
p.m.

By PAUL SAWYERt
Alexander Dovzhenko's "Earth,"c
long considered one of the su-
preme masterpieces of the silent
cinema, should be seen by every-f
one this week-end. I say this not
just because of its importance to
the history of the film, nor be-
cause of its great intrinsic merit,£
but because "Earth" represents at
its best a mode of visual art that
is radically different from most of1
what is seen on the screen today.
When the contemporary film is
compared to other art forms, the
most common analogy is that ofy
the novel. "Earth," more trulyt
than anything else I have seen, is
a celluloid poem, by virtue of its
movement, its emotional effect,<
and the extraordinary beauty of
its images.
Whatever plot it has consists
essentially of only two incidents-
the coming of a tractor to rural
area in Russia, and the marty-
rdom and burial of the youngj
peasant who triumphantly leads
the forces of collectivization. The{
film therefore does not have much
dramatic force, but consists rather
of a succession of moods, moving
to several climaxes, which is more
characteristic of poetry than of
any stricly dramatic work of art.
The various objects, characters,
and events, moreover, form a
group of motifs and archetypes;;

their function as the elements of
a narrative, or the facts about a
specific time and place, is second-
ary. One could say of this film
what James Agee said of "Birth of
a Nation"-that it is a sort of
mythic embodiment of certain
parts of a nation's collective ima-
gination.
This is most obvious in the ear-
lier part, where the bearded old
peasants, the massively plodding
oxen, the ocean-like fields of grain
beautifuly fit Russia's traditional
idealization of her peasant life.
But the collectivization of the
farm is also treated in folklorical
terms.
Through an imaginative Use of
cutting and composition, Dov-
zhenko arranges his visual motifs
-horse, tractor, old man, child,
telegraph poles, apples-to drama-
tize the conflict between old and
new progress and eternity. His
camera is extremely selective, his
images for the most part austere;
by means of a few well-chosen
details, he is able to present the
essence of a whole way of life.
A realization that this film is
essentially non-dramatic should
solve part of the problem of its
slowness of pace for the modern
viewer. Most of "Earth" demands
to be contemplated rather than
followed and anticipated. One
should go through it as one would

an art museum, savoring each
magnificently-composed shot as it
comes. Some episodes seem to ex-
ist timelessly, with little movement
and some of the visual repeated.
Other episodes are rapid montages,
exhilarating and luxurious to be-
hold.
The problem "Earth" faces, as}
does every work of arththat strives
self-consciously f o r simplicity,
"universality," and "lyricism," is
the danger of artificiality. In this
film, the borderline between a
poetic compression of events and
artificial contrivances is a slim
one. "Earth" is also impersonal,
in spite of its great beauty, the
enthusiastically cheering women
and energetic men-yes, even the
hero, with his boyish, arrogant
grin- are figures rather than
characters, modeled to propaganda
requirements.
Yet all this is not to say that
"Earth" deals in blacks and
whites only. The woman in child-
birth at the end indicates that
changes will be painful for some,
and for these, especially the'old,
there is sympathy. In "Earth"
Dozhenko constructed out of the
exigencies of propaganda a cine-
matic poem of great compassion
and beauty.
Program Information 2-6264
LAST 2 DAYS!
The story of a man who had
to re-live twelve years in one
day with four women!

A FANTASTIC AND SPECTACULAR VOYAGE...
THROUGH THE IUMAN B.DY...INTO THE BRA

4

Progran

n Ino nfoAQ2-6.26

n inormalonY- oo,+STARTING
Ud~iiifi SATURDAY
Emu mow FOR 4 DAYS
-"AMONG THE GREAT MOVIES
OF ALL TIME !"- .&4vu.
WATER READESTERLOC
to OWt. Matthew'

I

DIAL
8-6416

-Im. Tabalrom
tmijul I

HELD
OVER!
3rd Week

,r,

ENDS TODAY
shes aglow Winner
elihanACADEMY
you remember) AWARDS
MG-MeomstsanArthurFreed Rodud ons ta"gCinemascOpe
Leslie Caron - Maurice Chevauier - Louis Jourdan - , OL 'ao.r

"Astonishingly frank! An unabashed look at rebl-life sex.
Remarkably uninhibited and specific in its recording of
the way lovers talk and touch and think!"
--Richard Schnickel, Life Magazine
"A tender and lusty study of love. 'Dear John' is a tour de
force of erotic realism. Lovemaking banter . . . as explicit
as the law allows!" -Time Magazine
"A truly adult love story!
It is a beautifulilm,
finely made !N
-Judith Crist, N. Y. Herald Tribune A Nu iitts
e igt,M GAN" eloer
Next: MORGAN"- (delayed 1 week by holdover)

at 1:00-3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30

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4
N"IZATIO N NOTICES
} " {Ct r
{... . . ...'i, " 'Jr.. .. {tie r" '''' hi",ey.," u7 h "'4''i{s'+rx: :SS}°"v.h ;+"{

Phone 482-2056,
Extanu On CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
GRANLEY COMPANY ',
SAMANThA ECOAR
M HUTTON8A
Snown at 7:10-110 y
ACOLUMBIA PICnJW RELfMS
Plus-
Shown 9:25
"i atOnly

11

I

Panhellenic Association

11

Associated Students of Michigan State University
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT SERIES
Proudly Presents:
HENRY MANCINI and his
FORTY-PIECE ORCHESTRA
FRIDAY NIGHT, OCTOBER 7
MSU's Jennison Field House
Also Appearing THE FOUR PREPS, '.

7

announces

I

SORORITY

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* * * .
Baptist Student Unio, Lecture: Dr.
Thomas Gwaltney, "Christ as a Teach-
er," Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m., Packard Road
Baptist Church, 1131 Church St.
* * * .
Young Americans for Freedom, Gen-
eral membership meeting, Oct. 6, 7:30
p.m., Third Floor, Michigan Union. A
film strip on the Watts riots will be
"The Decline and Fall of
The Entire World As Seen
Through The Eyes of
COLE PORTER Revisited"
FRIDAY,.October 7
8:00 P.M.'
Pease Auditorium
5e stern.Michigan University
"A contagiously joyous evening
of theatre.. ." Saturday Review
Tickets: Presale, McKenny Union,
Eastern Michigan University,
Performance, Pease.

shown. All members and potential
members urged to attend.
* *
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
Lt. Cmdr. Herbert W. Kebschull: "The
Role of the Military at the University,"
Oct. 7, 12-1 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
* * *
Guild House, Friday evening cost
dinner and program,, Mrs.'Ann Shain
and Mrs. Betty Powell: "Aftermath of
Jones School Shut Down," Oct. 7, 6
p.m. dinner, 8:30-1:30 a.m., The Roost,
a sort of coffee house, Guild House,
802 Monroe.

INFORMAL RUSH

In formation Meeting

Oct. 6

7 P.M.

Also.

"LEAPING DANDIGS"
IN COLOR
2 COLOR CARTOONS

ROOM 3A, UNION

Tickets:

$2.50 Sold at the door

I

38-22-36

GOOD AT FIGURES? Petition now for
Women's Athletic Association treasurer.
Please fill out a form at the Barbour gym office
WANT TO TRIM YOUR FIGURE? Come take an envig-
orating study break. Attend the organizational
meetings of
GYMNASTICS CLUB-Tuesdays 7:15, Barbour Gym
ARCHERY CLUBR-Thursday Oct. 6, 7:15, WAB
CO-ED Square Dance-Sat. Oct. 15, 8-11 P.M. WAB

SECOND
ANNUAL

"Magnificent Virtuosity!"-Detroit News
"Great Dramatic Excitement!"-Toledo Blade
"Fite Bravura Style!"-Detroit Free Press

)A

HUMPHREY

I

CINEMA
I[

BOGART

I

i'll

presents

FILM FESTIVAL

1I~

Cary Grant
Leslie Caron

ARK COFFEE HOUSE
1412 Hill Street

in

ANDREW LUGG

three big-bi nights
Friday, Saturday, AND Sunday
CASABLANCA, THE BIG SLEEP, KEY LARGO,
TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE, THE MALTESE
FALCON, PETRIFIED FOREST

FATHER
GOOS E

Will Lecture on the Topic
"Eroticism and Mysticism

I

1111 111

I

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