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October 05, 1966 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-05

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAIUV

WEDNESDAY, O OA 6, 1966

OPENER TODAY:

Dodgers

Favored

mI

World

Series

. 1.1-11-

Next week explore,
en ineering o ortunities
as big as today's
brand new ocean
Talk with on~campus"Career Consultant from Newport News
--world's largest shipbuilding company-involved with
nuclear propulsion, aircraft carrier design, submarine build-
ing, oceanographic development, marine automation, all
the challenging advances on today's brand new ocean. The
New York TIMES calls this "the last earthbound frontier"~
with "profit possibilities as big as the sea."
Learn what our half-a-billion-dollar order backlog means to,
you in termrs of high-starting salary and years of career
security with no lid on your future. With orders up
$80,000,000 in five months, our need is urgent for imagina-
tive men in all the disciplines listed here. Men who like
tough challenges and individual 'responsibility.
Ask about opportunities for advanced degrees and research.
'We're next door toVirginia Associated Research Center with
one of the world's largest synchrocyclotrons, where grad-
uate engineers study high energy physics. We're across the
harbor from Old Dominion College, offering graduate
courses in Microwave Theory, Solid State Electronics, Nu-
clear Engineering. Nearby, too, is the Extension Division
of the University of Virginia offering courses toward credits
for masters degrees. And within easy driving is The Vir-
ginia "Institute for Scientific Research, a< world leader in
solid state physics.' Linked up with these opportunities,
Newport News offers scholarships, tuition grants, advanced
study and research leaves. Ask about them.
Get the facts on pleasant living and lower living costs here
in the heart of Virginia's seaside vacationland with its su-
perb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.

By The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES-Big Don Drys-
dale, the No. 2 man of the Los An-
geles Dodgers' pitching royalty,
will face 23-year-old Dave McNally
of the underdog Baltimore Orioles
in the World Series opener at
Dodger Stadium.
A sellout crowd of 55,000 will
watch the opener, scheduled for 3
p.m., Ann Arbor time.
McNally, a fast-balling lefty
with a 13-6 record and a 3.13 ERA,
gets thecall in the opener because
Orioles' manager Hank Bauer fig-
ures a southpaw pitcher is more
effective against the s p e e d y
Dodgers.
"Davey has the soundest arm on
the club right now," Bauer said
Monday, "and if the Series goes
seven games, we can give him
three starts."
Wanted Koufax
Manager Walt Alston would

have preferred to open with his 15-10 and second year man Wally.
27-game winner, Sandy Koufax, Bunker, 16-6, will comprise the
but had to switch to Drysdale opening Baltimore rotation. Os-
when Koufax was forced to pitch teen and Bunker hook up in Bal-
the full nine innings in the pen- timore Saturday when the scene
nant clincher at Philadelphia last shifts to the American League city.
Sunday. The Dodgers remained the 8-5
As the rotation now stands, choice because of their superior
Drysdale, 13-16, will be followed pitching and speed. Alston's staff
to the mound by Koufax, 27-9, and has a 2.63 earned run average
Claude Osteen, 17-14. Jim Palmer, and a whopping 52 complete games
compared with a 3.35 ERA and
only 23 complete games for the
Orioles.
Unbeaten at Home
In five previous World Series
games at Dodger Stadium, Kouf ax,

homers with a robust 175. The
Dodgers compiled an overall bat-
ting percentage of .256 while
knocking out a modest 108 round
trippers.
Sluggers Galore
With batsmen like Frank Rob-
inson, Brooks Robinson, Boog
Powell and Curt Blefary, the
Dodger mound corps will be put to
a severe test. Frank Robinson, who
became the first player in a dec-
ade to win batting's triple crown
by leading the league with a .316
average. 49 homers and 122 RBI's,
poses the greatest problem to Al-
ston and the Dodgers.
As for the rest of Baltimore's

A' E-n0 t h Lc 1K;01'vnf uFt~1tinvp'
Drysdale and Osteen havetallowed lineup, Bauer expects to platoon
a miniscule three runs total, with only his center fielders in the
each hurler fashioning a shutout. Series. Russ Snyder will play
The near-perfect pitching has against any right-handed pitching
brought the Dodgers' five victories while Paul Blair will get the call
and an unbeaten Series record at against lefties. Alston is making
home. one significant lineup change,
Both clubs boast strong bull- naming 38-year-old veteran Jim
pens, with the Dodgers' three con- Gilliam for the third base job
sisting of Phil Regan, Ron Per- held down in the last few weeks
ranoski and Bob Miller, and the of the season by Dick Schofield.
Orioles relying heavily on veter- Schofield is ineligible for the
ans Stu Miller, Idie Fisherand Classic because he joined the team
Moe Drabowsky along with rookie after the Sept. 1 deadline.
Eddie Watt.
The Orioles have a decided edge L.A. J i
in hitting, having led the Ameri if
can League in overall average with By The Associated Press
.259 and finishing second in LOS ANGELES - President

DON DRYSDALE

THE GENTLEMAN'S SHIRT

IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS

Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Marine Engineers
Industrial Engineers
Systems Analysts

Naval Architects.
Nuclear Engineers
Civil Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers

Mr. G. O. Vaughn,
Our Career Consultant,
will be at the Placement Office on Wednesday, October 12,
to answer questions, talk over qualifications, take applica-
tions for fast action.
NEWPORT NEWS SHIPBUILDING AND DRY DOCK COMPANY. NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA 0
An Equal opportunity Employer.

MAL DOMINY
(B.S.E.E.) of the
Bethlehem Steel Loop
Course knows where the
action is. He's an
electrical engineer at the.
world's most
modern steel plant
-our Burns Harbor Plant
in northern Indiana.
Join the action.
First step: pick up
a copy of "Careers
with Bethlehem Steel
and the Loop Course"
at your placement
office. Then sign up
for a campus interview.
Our 1967 Loop Class
has openings for technical
and non-technical graduates
(and post-grads) for
careers in steel operations,
research, sales, mining,
accounting, and other
activities.
An Equal Opportunity
Employer in the Plans for
Progress Program
BETHLEHEM
S T E E 1 TL
EL

Johnson says a good will visit to
Japan by the Los Angeles Dodg-
ers, starting shortly aftergtheir
World Series games with the Bal-
timore Orioles, will provide evi-
dence "that our two countries
have far more in common than
our mutually uncommon enjoy-
ment of baseball."
A letter of greeting from the
President to the Japanese people
was sent to Matsutaro Shoriki,
publisher of the Yomiuri Shim-
bun, the newspaper sponsoring
the Dodgers' visit.
Had a
unique
experience?
If so, real oriipaginary,
tell us about it in a
limerick and we'll send
you a completely
unique token of our
appreciation. Here's an
example:
"A chemistry major
named Bleaker,
Drank his Colt 45
from a beaker,j
He said, 'It's more
fun!
It holds two cans,
not one,
As an experience,
it's even uniqiuer. '

,.insights and insults
.. ~ CHUCK VETZNER
Camp Champs Who
0 tbomb Napalm
All right, Lyndon, now you've gone and done it. I've tried to be
patient and understanding. Sure, it takes a few years to get used to
your job. Everybody's entitled to a few mistakes. I remained calm
during the riots. I didn't panic when we napalmed the South Viet-
namese. What's a Bobby Baker here and there.
But dear Mr. President, how can I sleep easier at night when you
go and send the Dodgers to Japan.
LBJ, why must you choose the Dodgers to represent America.
Have you no pride. Haven't you ever seen the Game of the Week.
Even the Toledo Mudhens, but not the Los Angeles Dodgers, own-
ed and operated by Walter O'Malley, capitalist of the Western world.
Old Goldwater would bring out the call for the Yankees. Stokely
(the power guy) would give the Giants a ring. And you know very
well that Bobby, Teddy, and the Eastern Establishment would recom-
mend the Orioles.
But the Dodgers. What a group to send. It's like sending Allen
and Rossi to straighten out the Ghana Peace Corps unit. If the
Dodgers wrote the Declaration of Independence, they'd forget to mail
it. If they ran the CIA, Castro would be chief investigator for Latin
American affairs.
They're the champs, sure, but they don't fit in. They're radi-
cals in a sport for grey flannel suits. Winners are supposed to be
beautiful. Who ever heard of a sway back Kentucky Derby win-
ner, a Miss America with acne, a Rolls Royce with a rattle. The
Dodgers are the Ugly Americans with spikes and gloves. I'd
rather have Groucho Marx represent my country. Make that
Karl Marx.
The Dodgers perform the sport with the grace of a wounded boar
playing tag in a cactus patch. At their best, they're the Abominable
Baseball Men. When they're bad, people blacklist the products they
endorse.
The state of California ought to make them play in a closed
stadium-closed to the public.
The Dodgers strongest weapon is a withered left arm. When
they go into a slump, all you can do is look for a new arthritis
cure. The Dodgers swing bats the way Tarzan swings from trees-
with one hand and both feet off the ground. They hit home runs
about as often as P. K. Wrigley raises the price of his gum. More
Dodgers have died at second base in a double header than were
shot at the Alamo in a week.
But it's the fielding that really kills you. Lots of teams can't nit
and several rely on one pitcher. But they make up for it with a solid
defense. You know, the old American way. Don't, try to attack, just
keep them from making any advances.
Well, the team heading for Japan couldn't tag a Ricksha driver
in a run down between Yokohama and Yonkers. The last time a
Dodger caught a Texas Leaguer, two thousand people heard It on
their crystal sets.
When the Japanese see this bunch hit Honshu, they'll think
Ringling Bros. is playing Tokyo. Undoubtedly, one player will fall off
Fujiyama, and one will almost get drowned by a Geisha girl. The
Dodgers just can't do anything right.
This team is camp. They've got a style. It's called atrocious.
But, I must admit, they've got a message too. It's win, baby, win.
Somehow, they always figure out a way to forfeit defeat.
Maybe you do have a point Lyndon. You can't find a better
example of true heroism. Real rags to riches type stuff. And what's
more American than Horatio Alger. Go ahead and send the Bums to
the Orient. They'll confuse everybody so much, people will have to
respect them. The Dodgers will do us proud . . . if they don't get
lost on the way.
IN AP POLL:
Spartans Still First

*

Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

s ACs

Get the idea? Get it
down on a post card
and send to:
Limerick Contest,
Box 45, Colt, Arkansas.
In the meantime, try
this for inspiration?
NATIO '
A completely
unique
experience
0 SPECIAL PRODUCTS DIVISION
LTHE NATIONAL BREWING CO. BALTO.MD.4

By The Associated Press
Notre Dame continued to gain
ground on the leaders in this
week's Associated Press college
football poll while Arkansas, Ten-
nessee and Florida also made rap-
id advances on the strength of
impressive victories.
Michigan, who was ranked
eighth last week after two open-
ing victories, fell from the top 10
after losing to North Carolina 21-
7 last weekend. The Wolverines'
place among the top 10 was tak-
en by Florida which boosted its
record to 3-0 by beating Vander-
bilt and advanced to l0th place.

Michigan State, who faces Mich-
igan in East Lansing this Satur-
day, leads the pack for the third
straight week. The unbeaten Spar-
tans, who won their third in suc-
cession by defeating Illinois 26-
10 _ last Saturday, collected 371
points in the balloting.

4

WILD'S MEN'S STORE

A(I NLILLTALQS
TH{EM LEAN
AD CLEAN

311 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.

1. Michigan State (20) 3-0
2. UCLA (7) 3-0;
3. Notre Dame (8) 2-0
4. Alabama (3) 2-0
5. Arkansas (2) 3-0
16. So. California (1) 3-0
7. Nebraska 3-0
8. Tennessee 2-0
9. Georgia Tech 3-0
10. Florida 3-0

371
345
322
300
206
194
144
143.
83
69

I

I

Imm

mmmm

RE,

T

A

Others receiving votes, listed
alphabetically: Air Force, Bay-
lor Duke, Houston, MICHIGAN,
Missouri, Oklahoma, Purdue,
Southern Methodist, Texas, Wy-
oming.

IN ABu2LY
WrrH
~DAC2O
TO FIG-IT
(J1QN kLES,
KEEPS CREASES
SHARQ

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FOUR DAYS

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LIMOUSINES
for information call
663-8300
Tickets are available
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