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October 02, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-02

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNRAY, OCTOBER, 2, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MIChIGAN 1)41EV SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1966

PANASONIC
BY MATSUSHITA ELECTRIO
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Spartan

Juggernaut

Crushes

Illini

w

By The Associated Press
CHAMPAIGN - Sophomore Al
Brenner's 95-yard punt return for
a touchdown-longest in Big Ten
history-and a freak mid-air fum-
ble recovery that sent tackle Pat
Gallinagh lumbering 40 yards to
score sprung top-ranked Michigan
State to a 26-10 conference foot-
ball victory over Illinois yesterday.
Brenner took Tom Smith's punt
midway in the last quarter, streak-
ed up the middle and angled to-
ward the sidelines in his record
run-back to stun a crowd of
57,747.
But, what broke the game open
was the wierd touchdown by 220-

pound senior .Gallinagh minutes Beirne to set up a second quarter
before halftime. score for the Boilermakers and
It shot the Spartans ahead 13-3. Jim Finley hit Beirne for a 21-

1

Big Ten Standings

1

Another fumble captured late in
the third quarter on the Illini
three set up a touchdown sneak
by quarterback Jimmy Raye that
assured unbeaten MSU a fast start
in opening defense of its confer-
ence title.
4 - *
Purdue Boils SMU
LAFAYETrE-Purdue uncover-
ed two passing halfbacks to take
the pressure off quarterback Bob
Griese as the Boilermakers rolled
over previously unbeaten Southern
Methodist 35-23 yesterday.
Leroy Keyes passed to Jim

yard touchdown in the third.
Purdue was able to experiment
with its passing game after a long
return of the opening kickoff by
John Charles and a pass intercep-
tion by Keyes gave the Boilermak-
ers a 14-0 cushion in the first
period.
Wisconsin Nips Iowa
IOWA CITY - Wisconsin man-
aged to get a sputtering offense
into gear for only two big plays
yesterday, but that was enough for
a 7-0 victory over Iowa in the Big
Ten opener for both teams.
The Badgers, in pinning the 13th
straight conference defeat on
Iowa, struck early in the third
quarter when quarterback Frank
Boyajian and speedy right end
Tom McCauley teamed up on a
48-yard pass play that put the ball
on the Iowa seven.

Michigan State
Wisconsin
Indiana
MICHIGAN
Purdue
Ohio State
Minnesota
Iowa
Illinois
Northwestern

Conference All Games
W L Pctj PF PA W L PF
1 0 1.000 26 10 3 0 96
1 0 1.000 7 0 2 1 30
1 0 1.000 26 14 1 2 36
0 0 .000 0 0 2 1 65
0 0 .000 0 0 2 1 91
0 0 .000 0 0 1 1 36
0 0 .000 0 0 1 2 49
0 1 .000 0 7 1 2 34
0 1 .000 10 26 0 3 31
0 1 .000 14 26 0 3 28

PA
28
48
69
28
52
45
61
44
73
104

I0

NATIONAL ROUNDUP:
Bruins Tame Tigers

performance with a twisting 47-
yard touchdown scamper late in
the game that gave Washington,
its final points. ,n
The Buckeyes, who opened last
week with a 14-7 triumph over
Texas Christian, were a two-
touchdown choice but trailed 21-0

Gophers Holed Up
MINNEAPOLIS - Kinsas
crunched- 80 yards to score a
touchdown early in the fourth
quarter, then withstood the furious
passing of Minnesota reserve Larry
Carlson to edge the Gophers 16-14

JOHN BOYAJIAN

vaunted defensive line to shreds
yesterday, leading Washington to

By The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - UCLA and
Missouri lulled 32,649 and a na-
tional television audience into
lethargy for the better part of
three quarters yesterday, but the
explosives cut loose in the last
part of the game and UCLA
emerged on top 24-15.
Missouri, en route to its first
loss after six straight victories,
trailed 17-0 going into the last
quarter, but staged a furious rally
for two touchdowns and 15 points
to draw within two points of the
- I

also undefeated Bruins.
Gary Beban, UCLA's star quar-
terback, ran and passed the Bruins
209 yards in the first half, but
it all went for only a 3-0 lead at'
the half.
Huskers Squeak By
AMES, Iowa - Fullback Harry
Wilson burst loose for a 37-yard
touchdown run in the last quarter
yesterday to give Nebraska a
squeaky 12-6 victory over underdog
Iowa State to open defense of the
Cornhuskers' Big Eight Confer-
ence football title.
Nebraska, rated sixth-best team
in the nation, had a real battle
on its hands to down a stubborn
Cyclone team which maintained
a 6-6 tie until only a little less
than four minutes remained in
the game.
The Huskers scored twice in the
second quarter on 38- and 31-yard
field goals by Lars Wachholtz.

a 38-22 victory over the Buckeyes.
Buckeyes Choke Moore cracked the Buckeye line
COLUMBUS - Slashing half- for a fantastic 221 yards in 30
back Don Moore tore Ohio State's carries. He capped his brilliant
Collegre Roundup

I

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2

7:30 P.M.I

SCORES
GRID SELECTIONS
North Carolina 21, MICHIGAN 7
MSU 26, Illinois 10
UCLA 24, Missouri
Purdue 35, SMU 23
Notre Dame 35, Northwestern 7
Texas 35, Indiana 0
California 30, Pittsburgh 15
Wisconsin 7, Iowa 0
Kansas 16, Minnesota 14
Washington 38, Ohio State 22
Alabama 17, Mississippi7
Baylor 20, Washington State 14
Georgia Tech 13, Clemson 12
Duke 27, Virginia 8
Cornell 15, Colgate 14
Tennessee 23, Rice 3
Army 11, Penn State 0
Stantord 33, Tulane 14x
LSU 10, Miami (Fla) 8
Hamilton 34, Rensselaer Poly 6
OTHER SCORES
Nebraska 12, Iowa State 6
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2
Day Calendar
School of Music Recital-Students of
the Wind Instrument Department: Re-
cital Hall, School of Music, 4:30 p.m.
School of Music Recital - Marian

Air Force 15, Navy 7
Syracuse 28. Maryland 7
Colorado 10, Kansas State 0
No. Carolina St. 15, Wake Forest 12
Rutgers 17, Yale 14
Holy Cross 7, Dartmouth 6
Pennsylvania 20, Brown 0
Wyoming 36, Arizona 6
Princeton 14, Columbia 12
Mississippi State 20, Richmond 0
San Jose State 21, Oregon 7
Harvard 45, Tufts 0
New Mexico St. 23, Utah St. 7
Boston College 14, VMI 0
Slippery Rock 7, Edinboro 7 (tie)
w. Virginia 13, Virginia Tech 13 (tie)
Miami (O) 26, Western Michigan 7
Georgia 7, South Carolina 0
Kentucky 17, Auburn 7
North Texas State 20, Louisville 19
Florida 13, Vanderbilt 0
Texas A & M 38, Texas Tech 14
Arkansas 21, TCU 0
Houston 35, Oklahoma State 9
Owen, pianist: Recital Hall, School of
Music, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Gian Carlo Menotti's
"The Medium": Architecture Aud., 7
and 9 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA Repertory Company in
"Three Mysteries with Two Clowns":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
Open Draft Discussion: Led by Capt.
William Pascoe of Public Information
Office. Sponsored by UAC, on Sun.,
Oct. 2 at 4 p.m., Aud. A, Angel Hall.
UAC Creative Arts Committee: A
read-in, "Poets on the War in Viet
Nam," Union Ballroom, 8 p.m., Oct. 2.
Events Monday
Public Health Assembly -hGeorge
James, dean, Mount Sinai School of
Medicine, New York City, "Prologue,
Progress, Programs": Aud., School of
Public Health, 4 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Jose Millare, saxophone: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.

-i'The Dynamics of World Politics-
a Perspective From India "
Professor M. M. THOMAS, Kerala, India
of the
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Woshtenow Avenue
Begins a four-week series on
"Nation-Building In Asia" highlighting:
INDIA-October 2
CHINA-October 9
INDONESIA-October 16
JAPAN-October 23
EVERYONE WELCOME

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:

f
i

before they could even get on the yesterday.
scoreboard. The Jayhawks, smashing Minne-
* * * sota's running game, forced the
Irish Claw 'Cats Gophers to turn to the left-hand-
ed Carlson's passing but it was
EVANSTON - Notre Dame's not enough to overcome the Kan-
slick sophomore passing combina- sas ground attack.
tion of Terry Hanratty and Jim The Hawks' margin of victory
Seymour put enough steam in an came on quarterback Dave Boudas'
erratic Irish attack to conquer 26-yard field goal with 18 seconds
dogged Northwestern 35-7 yester- left in the first quarter.
day. * * *
Hanratty completed 14 of 23 Texas Blasts Indiana
passes for 202 yards and Seymour
snagged nine tosses for 141 yards AUSTTN-Texas scored in every
as the fourth-ranked Irish plodded quarter with a balanced attack
to their second straight victory last night to crush Indiana 35-0 in
against 20-point underdog North- an intersectional football game.
western. Bill Bradley, sensational sopho-
In between squandering scoring more quarterback, directed the
chances because of penalties and Longhorns to two touchdowns be-
c anes caus o enaliesandfore suffering a knee injury in the
fumbles, Notre Dame scored four fors f a
times on the ground with the first half.
timaontemounaeriate His sub. Andy White, led the
Hanratty -Seymour aerial act set-aroused Texans to three more
ting up two of them,_touchdowns in the second half.
Texas' stingy defense hawked

S. STATE atN. UNIVERSITY
next to Follett's

READ AND USE DAILY (LASSIFIED ADS

- ~'

A
man

I

CREATIVE ARTS COMMITTEE'PRESENTS

POPULAR DANCE LESSONS
(Frug, Jerk, Monkey, Etc.)
Thursdays-Oct. 6-27 . . . 7:30-9:30 p.m.
$4
BRIDGE I LESSONS
Tuesdays-Oct. 4-Nov. 15 ... 7-9:00 p.m.
$6
BRIDGE 11 LESSONS
Tuesdays-Oct. 4-Nov. 15 . .. 9-1 1:00 p.m.
$6
SIGN UP IN FISHBOWL OCT. 3
or
CALL U.A.C. STUDENT OFFICES
662-4431, Ext. 1030

HOWARD KOHNI
General Notices
Woodrow Wilson Fellowships: Nomi-
ntions for Woodrow Wilson Fellowships
for first year graduate work leading
to a career in college teaching are due
Oct. 31. Only 'faculty members may
nominate candidates. Eligible for nomi-
nation are men and women of out-
standing ability who are seniors, or
graduates notnow enrolled in a grad-
uate school, or graduates now in the
armed forces who will be free to enter
a graduate school in 1967-68. Seniors
who next semester will be double en-
rolled in the Literary College and in
the Graduate School are eligible .To
give nominees sufficient time to pre-
pare and submit the required cre-
dentials, faculty members are urged to
send in their nominations as early as
possible, although letters postmarked
Oct. 31 will be accepted.
Letters of nomination should include
the student's field of concentration,
his local address and telephone, and
should be sent to Prof. Otto G.FGraf,
Department of German, 1079 Frieze
Bldg., University of Michigan.
Seniors interested in advanced study
and a teaching career whose academic
performance merits nomination for
Woodrow Wilson fellowships may con-
sult the campus representative, Prof.
Morris Greenhut, 1616 Haven, concern-
ing qualifications and procedures.
Career Opportunities Abroad: The In-
ternational Center, in cooperation with
the International Committee of UAC
will present a special program on "Ca-
reer Opportunities Abroad" at 8 p.m.
on Wed., Oct. 5, in the Michigan Union
Ballroom. Included will be a four mem-
ber panel of speakers. Following the
panel, the audience will be invited to
visit the organizational representatives
and displays present for the program.
Organizations represented will include
Department of State, U.S. Information
Agency, Peace Corps, International
Voluntary Services, General Motors,'
Ford Motor, Department of Defense
Overseas Schools, Goodyear Interna-
tional, Firestone International, IBM
World Trade, American Friends Service
Committee, Overseas Educational Serv-
the U.S. Office' of Education. All stu-
ice, Near East College Association, and
dents are welcome to attend.
Science Research Club: Meeting Oct.
4 at 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Brief business meeting, election of new
members, "Recent Trends in Remote
Sensing," M. R. Holter, Institute of Sci-
ence and Technology, and "Five Years
of Research on Fatal Car Accidents."
Donald F. Huelke, Department of Anat-
omy.
Flu Shots: There will be a "flu shot"
clinic at the Health Service Tues., Oct.
4, from 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30 p.m.
The charge is $1 for students and spouse
and $1.50 for faculty, staff and spouses.
Notice to Employes of All University
Units: Blue Cross-Blue Shield and Ma-
jor Medical Expense Insurance Open

every loose ball and made key
plays on every Indiana drive in
shutting out the Hoosiers.
Enrollment Period will be held in the
locations below from Oct. 3 through
Oct. 14, 1966.
Campus-Office of Staff Benefits,
3058 Administration Bldg.; Medical Cen-
ter, Office of Staff Benefits, 7030A
Hospital; Union, Business Office.
New applications and changes to
existing contracts may be made with-
out evidence of insurability. Family
members, eligible for coverage, may be
added at this time, including those
unmarried children over 19 but not yet
25 who are income tax dependents.
No new applications, changes, or
additions will be accepted after this
enrollment period, other than for new
employes or approved 30-day changes
until October of 1967.
Doctoral Examination for Frederic
Joseph Cadora, Near Eastern Languages
and Literatures; thesis: "An Analytical
Study of Interdialictal Lexical Com-
patibility in Arabic," Mon., Oct. 3, Room
2223 Angell Hall, at 7:30 p.m. Chairman,
E. McCarus.
Doctoral Examination for Hugh
Meredith Mellhenny, Pharmaceutical
Chemistry; thesis: "Constituents of
Gymnema Sylvestre R. Br., II," Mon.,
Oct. 3, Room 2407 Chemistry-Pharm-
acy Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman, J. E.
Sinsheimer.
Additional Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting
September 29, 1966
Rules Covering the Use of the
Fishbowl and Diag
Introduction:
The privilege of using University fa-
cilities has been granted to recog-
nized student organizations who have
received permissioni from the Office of
Student Organizations. In order to in-
sure tre orderly use of these facilities,
certain rules have been established to
protect the rights and privileges of all
organizations. At no time should any
person or organization interfere with
the orderly and responsible discharge
of another's freedoms. At the same
time, no group shall be allowed to in-
terfere with the ongoing educational
and operational programs of the Uni-
versity. Inherent in this privilege is
the responsibility for the self adher-
ence to these rules, as well as their
enforcement in both the Fishbowl and
Diag areas. Written permission to use
the Fishbowl, Diag, and bulletin
boards must be obtained from Alpha
Phi Omega.
Rules governing 5;
Rules Governing the Use of the Fish-
bowl:
a. Use of the Fishbowl is limited
to no more than two student organi-
zations at any one time.
b. One table and two chairs are
available for use by each organiza-
tion. No other tables or chairs may
be used. Tables are to be kept to the
west wall area. (Equipment is stored
in Room C-70-B, Angell Hall.)
c. Literature may be available at a
table to be picked up by interested
persons, but not handed out.
(Continued on Page 8)

,/

Jerome Bad anes
Robert Bly
Will Geer

N 7 /
jL~,a
ski

Donald Hall
W. 0. Snodgrass
John Woods

I

-- -

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diag art fair

DOWNTOWN HONDA
" ,..Big or Small Stt-
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WENK Sales & Service, Inc.
310 East Washington 665-8637 Soles, Service, Parts Accessories
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Hill

E

Mon., Oct. 3-Tues.,

Oct. 4

"POETS ON THE WAR IN VIETNAM"
-m -m -

10 A.M.-5 P.M.
Student-Faculty Entries

PETITION

*
-1

for

AI "A"

it

I

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