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September 30, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

30,196 TE iCHGA DAL-PAG-SVE

I

insights and insults
fHHfK VFT7NFR

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Dodl nrs lNpor Flao tas Ktnufax Wins 26th

r

MEEW' ! so mill

uinuu I

Improving Intramurals
Without Really

Trying

The University has a lot of problems, and one of them is the
Intramural Department. When people want to play handball, codeball,
paddleball, and squash they have to wait many hours. This is because
the IM Building facilities can't accommodate all the people who wantI
to play. Unfortunately, they don't have any money to make thingss
better.l
Actually the Administration claims intramurals isn't their prob-x
lem. They point South and tell the Athletic Department to fix thingsI
Lip. But the Athletic Department explains that they really aren't inr
charge and have only been acting like nice guys and giving their extra
money to IM. And when you can't finish a new field house, you don't
feel like being nice guys. To say nothing about having extra money.
Every once in a while, the Athletic Department politely pointsc
out that they need money to continue running the program. But onet
has to be awfully ingenious to get money from the Administration.c
And building a new field house also makes them feel less ingeniousr
every day. Meanwhile the poor IM Department gets worse all the time.
Now this situation is not going unnoticed by any means. A
lot of people have said how rotten everything is. Sometimes they
sound angrier than Les Maddox does when the word Stokely is
mentioned. But University people don't blow their cool very often.
After shaking their fists, they calm down and begin figuring out
how to get more alumni funds to build new parking lots. They
won't be equipped with goal posts either.
But happily the University is not totally inactive. Someone ap-
pointed a man named Mr. Stuedy to make a study of the problem. It
has a ring to it, doesn't it? Well, Mr. Stuedy is making his study and
people aren't about to rush him. It should be done in a month or two.
It's always dangerous to speculate, but M7. Stuedy's study will
probably suggest changes. He will probably urge that someone volun-
teer to run IM, and if no volunteers, someone should be appointed.
If Mr. Stuedy takes a really fresh look at the problem, he might
cautiously suggest that somebody should give the IM Department some
money. Hopefully, the study won't suggest radical changes like more
land and new facilities. That kind of thinking could get him in trou-
ble, and give the whole program a bad name..,
It also must be hoped that the faculty and student body
doesn't get impatient and try to force the Administration into
hasty action. Admittedly, the situation gets worse every year, but
it would be out of line for any immediate steps to be taken. As
everyone knows, this sort of thing takes a lot of time and
planning.
But it would help a lot if Harlan Hatcher were nuts about playing
volleyball.

By The Associated Press
ST. LOUIS-The Los Angeles
Dodgers increased their Nation-
al League lead to two gaties last
night as Sandy Koufax stopped
St. Louis 2-1 on four hits and be-
came the first pitcher in major
league history to i-each the 300-,
strikeout level in three different
seasons.
The victory put the Dodgers in
position to clinch their secondr
straight pennant tonight if they
beat Philadelphia and second-
place Pittsburgh loses to San'
Francisco. The Dodgers and Pi-
rates each have three games re-
maining.
Koufax, now 26-9, went into the
game with 294 strikeouts. He
reached and passed the 300 level
when he struck out the side in
the fourth inning. Koufax struck
out 386 batters in 1963 and fan-
ned 382 last season.
Walter Johnson of the Wash-
ington Senators and Rube Waddell

of the Philadelphia Athletics pre-
viously were tied with Koufax
for the record with two 300-
strikeout seasons each.
Koufax, who also struck out
the side in the sixth inning, wound
up with 13 strikeouts, marking
the 14th time this season and the
96th time in his career that he
has struck out 10 or more batters
in a game.
The only run off the arthritic
left-hander came in the seventh,
when the Cards' Curt Flood hom-
ered over the left field wall.
Singles by Orlando Cepeda in
the second inning and Tim Mc-
Carver in the fifth, and Flood's
two-out double in the ninth were
the only other hits off Koufax.
The Dodgers scored their first
run in the second inning on three
singles. Jim Lefebvre, who beat
out a slow roller down the third
base line for a single, scored on
Wes Parker's ground single to left.

T AL VW/ N .. gA/t..7 lN. lU.. if!U-/ 9N /'U~ 9i R/tz7 ...ILX./UNIfU

In the fifth, John Roseboro sin-
gled to short left center and even-
tually scored from third on Wil-
lie Davis' line single to rightn-
Al Jackson, the Cardinals'
starting pitcher. was charged with
his 15th loss against 13 victories.
Astros W hip Reds
CINCINNATI-Pitcher Don Wil-
son got a victory in his first
major league appearance last
night as the Houston Astros edged
Cincinnati 3-2 on home runs by
Chuck Harrison and Aaron Point-
er.
Wilson allowed five hits and
struck out seven in six inningsaof
relief.
Harrison homered in the sixth
after Sonny Jackson singled.
Pointer belted a solo homer in the
seventh, his first in the majors.
Art Shamsky homered for the
Reds following a single by Lee
Maye in the seventh inning.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
CLARK NORTON
"Could you tell me, please:
what are Floggs?"
"Assuredly Floggs are like led-
erhoseh only with legs and not
suspenders. They're bermudas
except for being leather. Floggs
act like regular pants only ...
umm ..they have two zippers
in front and a... uh ... knife
pocket. Yes, and they have
comfort, with being unique and
others too numerous to men-
t ;ion. Yes."
A public service intimation
from
floggs
by J/P
KEN DRESNER provides
further answers.
P-23 Lawyer's Club

ATTENTION: DRAFT CARD BURNERS
Attend the
DRAFT DISCUSSION
Led by Capt. William S. Pascoe of
Public Information Office
Ed Robinson, SGC President
John Delamater, GSC President
OPEN TO ALL
SUNDAY, OCT. 2.. .4:00 P.M.
AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL

U
rl

r.

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIED AD

SANDY KOUFAX

,i

i

I

Ma iorleaguie Standings

i

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W :L Pct. GB
x-Baltimore 96 60 .615 -
Detroit 88 71 .553 9y>
Minnesota 86 72 .544 11
Chicago 82 77 .516 151
Cleveland 80 79 .503 17y
Califonia 78 81 .491 191/.
Kansas City 71 86 .452 25y>
Washngton 71 88 .447 26y4
Boston 72 90 .444 27
New York 68 88 .436 82
x--Clnched pennant.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York at Washington (2, rain)
ansassCity at Baltimore (2, rain)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at California
New York at Chicago
Kansas City at Detroit
Minnesota at Baltimore (2)
Only games scheduled

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB

Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
San Francisco
Philadelphia
Atlanta
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
New York
Chicago

94
92
90
85
83
80
75
70
65
59

65
67
68
74
76°
79
82
89
93
100

.59 -
.579 2
.570 31%
.535 s
.522 11
.503 14,
.478 18
.440.24
.411 28!2
.371 35

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 2, St. Louis 1
Houston 3, Cincinnati 2
Only games scheduled t
TODAY'S GAMES
Houston at New York
Los Angeles at Philadelphia
San Francisco At Pittsburgh
Atlanta at Cincinnati
Chicago at St. Louis

MONEY DOES NOT GROW ON TREES
Unless, of course, apples are used as a medium of exchange.
But MONEY can become as worthwhile as a rotten apple, and it'is hap-
pening right now. Do YOU understandWHY?
Maybe you should get q copy of "MONEY-a mysterious subject?" at
Ulrich's or Wahr's book store and learn some FACTS about money and
banking that will come in right handy to YOUR education.

,

a nl-.

ille

BAGELS & LOX BRUNCH
sponsored by Hillel Grad. Student Comm
Guest Speaker: DR. MARVIN FELHEIM
The Jew in "THE MERCHANT OF VENICE
Sunday, Oct 2-12:00 Noon
Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St.
Admission 99c

RECEIVING A DEGREE?
In December? May? or August?
uave you signed up for
your Senior Pictures yet?
your picture must be taken by our photographers
to go in the book (that's the MICHIGANENSIAN,
you know)
of course, you realize, this will have to be done
soon, if you're going to get an appointment
Yes, you can buy the MICH,IGANENSIAN there
too; it's five dollars now, but the price goes up soon

Dine Out This Weekend!
EAT, DRINK and BE MERRY-

,
, >.,
,'

tti

I

OPEN: Mon., Wed. and Thurs., 4 P.M. to 2 A.M.
OPEN: Fri., Sat., Sun., Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tuesday)
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE
'314 DETROIT ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
CARRY-OUT ORDERS ONLY-PHONE 665-2266
FREE DELIVERY
BARBECUE CHICKEN AND RIBS

0111 Ni deber
211-213 N. Main St. 668-975,

i
tI I

i

FRIED CHICKEN

SHRIMP AND FISH

I, - I

04

I

I

sp a y u nsa
NO! TIENG ONG
nsa
f imm7mme

N-
And furthermore, if you are
especially adept in a foreign
language, the National Security
Agency is ready to give
you immediate linguistic
assignments or may even train
you in an entirely new language.
Demonstrated ability in
language research can lead
to more complex and
sophisticated duties. The
systematic accumulation of
information, examination of
data and preparation of special
reports are important parts of
these assignments. And
scientific linguists will find
nowhere else the opportunities
for practical applications of
their craft.,
At NSA you will be joining
an Agencyof national
prominence-a unique civilian
organization responsible for
developing "secure"
communications systems to
transmit and receive vital
Information.
NSA offers you this opportunity
to further broaden your
knowledge of modern language
or area studies, and to use
your talents in a challenging
and rewarding career while
you enjoy also the broad,
liberal benefits of Federal
employment. In return, we ask
that you not only know your
language, but that you be
flexible, naturally inventive and
intellectually curious. That's
a lot to ask.
Do you fit the picture?
Where to go... what to do

STEAK AND, SHAKE
1313 South Un iv'esity
CHAR-BROILED HAMBURGER STEAK
Potatoes, Salad, Bread & Butter ..$1.30
VEAL CUTLET
Potatoes, Salad, Bread & Butter $1.25
CAGODeA
Chinese and American Restaurant

Specializing inI GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING LOT ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays
STU DENTS
Now's your chance to get the
THE,"GREATEST PIZZA"
at South U. Restaurant
For your convenience-open 24 hours daily
0 Carry-out All Week ! 662-4170
Breakfasts-Lunches-Dinners
FIRESIDE LUNE

311 South Main

662-4241

3140 Packard

NO 8-7488

OPEN DAILY-I 1 A.M. to 1:30 AM.
OPEN SUNDAY-11 A.M- to 10P.M.
Closed Mondays

"!i
,

get the BEST food in town
- PEA PODS *"HONGSHU
* CHINESE BEAN CAKES 0 CURRY POWDER

Order for banquets, parties or any other combinations

t . -t.j = t

Friday Nite Seafood Smorgasbord
FOOD and LIQUOR SERVED
OPEN * Mon.-Thurs.-1 1 :30-8 P.M.
s Fri. & Sat.-11 :30-9 P.M.
* Closed Sunday
Try our BEEF BUFFET after the game.
Served 4-7 P.M. All you can eat $3.25
BAR-open 'til 2 nightly
SIEES
Delicatessen Restaurant
Between, University Hospital and
St. Joseph Hospital-i1030 E. Ann
Breakfast-Lunch--Dinner
For a Change Try Our
# HOT PASTRAMI on ONION ROLL
. LnV- - (-OPN Di f- n nCi kOii I

I

J7OBOPIT Ball l3blK

Language applicants must
take the Professional
Qualification Test (PQT) as a
prereauisite to NSA interviews

M ! ..., ......,.

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