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September 29, 1966 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-29

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PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DrAIUV

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29. 1966

PAGE TEN TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 196$

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Civil Rights Commission Calls
Conferent on Race Violence
DETROIT (M)-Plans for a con- Harbor this summer had been and pirority attention and action
ference of officials from some 20 pointed out more than a year ago that they deserve."
Michigan cities - including Ann by the commission. "Remedial action costs much in
Arbor - to prevent further racial It wasn't until violence struck,|terms of time, effort and money,
violence were announced Tuesday he said, that local officials moved the commission said.
by the State Civil Rights Commis- into high gear to solve the causes. "But the alternative of social
sion. The commission pointed out disorder and conflict is far more'
John Feikens, commission co- that the reasons for outbreaks mostly," it added.
chairman, said the meeting prob- are many and complex and vary Anomie
ably would be held in Lansing at from city to city. Many Negroes feel a sense of
a date to be announced later. But, it added, "in almost every frustration, alienation and hostil-
In a memorandum mailed to community where there is an ap- ysn
mayors, city managers and other preciable minority group popula- ity toward a society and awhichhasno
local government leaders, the com- tion, there are problems of in- done enough tcte
mission said it was asking again equality and segregation in hous- conditions, the commission said.
that they "face action now to ing, employment, public education
prevent future conflict, violence and law enforcement which cryw "There are always some people
and disorder. out for remedial action. who will continue to feel that they
"The best was to stop a riot is "No responsible Negro minority have nothing to lose by partici-
to prevent it from happening," it group leader expects the millen- pating in acts of violence to ex-
declared. nium overnight, but increasingly press their grieveances," the me-
Feikens told newsmen that some they and your State Civil Rights morandum explained, adding:
of the basic causes of racial flare- Commission expect that these "In some few communities these
ups that hit Lansing and Benton problems will be given the serious mass grievances can and have been
exploited by demagogues or extre-
mists, but to say that such per-
i sons are responsible for the? out-
Scarcity of Loans Increases breks is to shift the focus of at-
tention from the real and basic
fPr le of causes."
POh m o College Costs The commission said it deplored
and condemned violence, and gov-
ernnent must use force to restore
By JOHN CUNNIFF The cost of higher education is law and order..

ISR Continues Study
Of Student Groups
For the past 14 years, the Uni- will be able to see what their
versity Institute for Social Re- members think of the organiza-
search has been conducting a ma- tion and thus, will be able to as-
jor study in an effort to under- sess and improve their programs
stand college life from the stu- and policies. The study will not be
dents' point of view. Since 1952, a profile of each of the groups, but
the Michigan Student Study has rather a comparison between reli-
interviewed thousands of students, gious groups, political groups, fra-
probing their reactions to classes, ternities and sororities as units.
to campus trends, to other stu- The participation in this study
dents and many other major areas, is strictly voluntary and confiden-
An integral part of the study is tial. The study is a means to con-
the Student Organization Study tribute to a better understanding
b-ing continued this year. The of the American university and the
first part of this study was con- part student organizations play in
ducted last spring. This project the lives of students.
researches the student experience
in a group context. For many stu- The Institute for Social Re-
dents, the researchers feel, the search is staffed by sociologists,
groups they belong to play an political scientists and psycholo-
important part in the friendships gists. The Institute moved into its
formed and values and interests new building on Thompson St. last
developed at the University. year.
Twenty-nine student organiza-
tions on campus have been chosen
to participate in the study-five
religious groups, four political
,groups, ten fraternities and ten
sororities. The members of each
organization have been given
questionnaires concerning their
experiences in the group, how they
joined, what they feel they have' +
gotten from membership in the
group. By December the results uth
of the study will be available to
the different groups so that they

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Business Analystt
NEW YORK () - The highn
cost of attending college, always ac
cause of frantic figuring and fi-
nancial juggling by parents, is
hurting even more this year.
Most parents and students weret
prepared for the high tuition andc
other costs of college life. But oth-r
ers were surprised by the difficul-2
ty of getting low-cost, delayed-
payment educational loans.
Some banks simply didn't have
the money to lend because of pre-r
vious commitments to profitable
interest rates elsewhere.
Although close to a billion dol-
lars is invested in student loant
programs - through government
plans administered by colleges,c
government loans administered by
banks, and straight loans to par-
ents - the demand has grownJ
fast. And money is tight.
Some Sold Stock
To obtain funds, some parents
have sold stock at a very inappro-
priate time - when prices have
dropped about 20 percent below
their heights of a few months ago.
Few parents and students are
going to permit themselves to be
caught again next year, but the
fact remains that without loans
some students simply won't be able
to attend college.

outpacing personal income. And Permanent Solution
today's enrollment of about 4.5
millon ollge tudets s fre- "The lasting, permanent solu-
castio tollnerlydetbyi1973e-tion is not more force," it said,
Manv of these will not have cash" s coi

They will have to borrow.
Farsighted bankers, realizing
that a student later will use a
checking account, a savings ac-
count, will purchase a car and a
house, recognize the value of such
an investment.
Three Billion in 1972
Hopefully, they will supply the
money. The First National City
Bank in New York estimates that
the billion dollars now available
will probably double in 1969 and
triple by 1972.
"I suggest that until 100 percent
of the nation's banks are involved
we will not have met our obliga-
tions in the public interest," says
J. Howard Laero, vice-chairman of
First National City.

form."
Feikens told newsmen that he
felt the commission's policy of
holding hearings where Negroes
could air their problems before
u'ficials was more constructive
than street demonstrations.
He indicated disapproval of re-
cent demonstrations'staged in Chi-
cago and suburban Cicero by such
Negro leaders as Martin Luther
King.
"I don't think you solve prob-
lems by posing hypothetical is-
sues,' he said. "Getting leaders to-
gether is a more effective way
than to hold marches.

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