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August 30, 1966 - Image 17

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, X966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIV r

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

Convict Editor of
Court Contempt

MSU: Protests, Riots, Inquiries 'RED ACTIVITY':

A- " -1-1 -1 - CO N -1 -

By CHARLES WILKINSON
Miss Annette Buchanan, man-
aging editor of the University of
Oregon Daily Emerald, was con-
victed of contempt of court last
summer after she refused to name
students she wrote about in a
" story on marijuana users. She
plans to appeal her conviction.
On May 24 the Emerald publish-
ed a story written by Miss Bucha-
nan which quoted seven anony-
mous students who described use
a-i enjoyment of marijuana.
The morning that the story ap-
peared, District Attorney William
Frye of Lane County asked Miss
Buchanan to tell a grand jury in-
vestigating use of narcotics who
the students were.
Journalistic Ethics
Miss Buchanan refused to reveal
the smokers' identity because she
had promised the students she
would not disclose their names
and because she said it would be
a breach of journalistic ethics to
do so.
After her refusal Frye got a
court order from Oregon Circuit
* Court Judge Edward Leavy direct-
ing her to give the grand jurors
the names.
At the hearing on June 13 Miss
Buchanan again refused to reveal
the smokers' identities. Besides her
promises to her sources of in-
formation and her concept of
journalistic ethics, she refused to
give the names because she felt
the scope of the grand jury inves-
tigation would make it unneces-
sary for her to reveal the informa-
tion, because she thought her
rights under the First and Four-
teenth Amendments were threat-
ened and because her attorney
was not allowed at the hearing.
Three others-another Emerald
editor, a former editor and the
former managing editor-were al-
so subjoenaed to appear before the
grand jury but were dismissed
when they said they didn't know
the names of the students quoted
in the story.
Miss Buchanan, however, was
cited for contempt of court, con-

viction of which in Oregon carries
a maximum sentence of six months
in jail and a $300 fine.
In her June 27 trial Miss Bu-
chanan took the stand twice, each
time reiterating that she con-
sidered it an ethic of journalism
not to disclose the names of con-
fidential news sources she used in
getting a story.
Journalists Speak
Professional journalists also tes-
tified in her defense.
"She should not respond to the
order of the court," testified Ste-
phen Still, managing editor of the
Oakland, Calif., Tribune. He said
any reporter who violated a con-
fidence "would be drummed out of
the business."
Frye asked: "Do you think this
tenet of your profession is a high-
er rule than the law?"
"In most instances, yes," said
Still.
Twelve states have laws grant-
ing newsmen the right to keep
their news sources confidential,
but Oregon-like 37 other states-
has no such law.
In his closing argument Frye
said that "it is contemptuous to
violate an order of the court and
contemptuous to refuse to answer
questions. That is the only thing
this case is all about."
He stated that the grand jury
needed Miss Buchanan's informa-
tion; her attorney said it could be
gained from other sources.
"She is in a dilemma where she
has no alternative," Johnson said.
"It would be disrespect to this
court for her to break her word
and disclose the names."
Miss Buchanan was found
guilty, however, and was ordered
by Judge Leavy to pay a $300
fine.
Frye considered bringing her be-
fore the grand jury again, but
decided against the action when
she still refused to divulge the
names.
Miss Buchanan and Johnson are
now preparing to appeal the con-
tempt decision to the Oregon Su-
preme Court.

By MICHAEL HEFFER
The past four months have been
full of news from Michigan State
University. The major events,
some of national interest, were
* Anti-Viet Nam War demon-
strators picketed a commencement
address by Vice-President Hubert
Humphrey, and were involved in
a shoving match with police;
* MSU officials went before
a committee in the Michigan
House of Representatves to ex-
plain MSU's relations with the
government of Premier Ngo Dinh
Diem; as reported in Ramparts
magazine;
! A student magazine, The
Paper, had its outhorization with-
drawn, an action condemned by
the American Civil L i b e r t i e s
Union;
! A faculty committee recom-
mended a broad series of changes
in MSU rules to liberalize regula-
tions, and
n Tensions of final exams re-
sulted in a series ,of student riots.
Humphrey Address
Humphrey's address on June 12
was picketed by 75 protestors, who
later charged the Secret Service
officers initiated a pushing melee
with them. As the vice-president
received an honorary degree, the
protestors, chanting "No degrees
for murder," marched out.
Then the trouble began. Uni-
versity student Gary Rothberger,
'67, charged that someone wearing
the three-colored pin of Secret
Service officers guarding Hum-
phrey, "put his foot in front of
me, tripped me and then slugged
me on the head."
Rothberger later charged that
although the East Lansing police
knew who the man was, they re-
fused to do anything. An MSU
student involved in a similar in-
cident that day said he would file
charges against a police officer.
Humphrey, in his speech, termed
dissenters "a source of strength."
MSU-CIA
In another news item of na-
tional prominence, MSU President

parts magazine that claimed MSU'
had given arms to and trained
the secret police of the late Ngo
Dinh Diem of South Viet Nam,
while being used as a cover for the;
Central Intelligence Agency.
Hannah denied the charges and;
said he himself had never been
shown any conclusive evidence of
the CIA men, only "suspicions.
He also supported the training of
Diem's police.
However, Stanley Sheinbaum,
co-author of the Ramparts article;
and former campus coordinator of
the MSU Viet Nam project, de-
clared he had discussed the CIA
men with Hannah several times.
Many people had this summary
of the affair:
"No American professor, as a
result of the MSU project, can go
overseas today to the many coun-
tries which are already suspicious
of American motives without car-
rying a much greater burden."
The Paper
MSU's reputation received an-
other blow shortly thereafter when
the university's publications board
withdrew authorization from The
Paper, a weekly magazine of refu-
gees from the censored offices of
the State News, MSU's student
newspaper.
At the same time, The Paper
lost its printer when that indi-
vidual decided to stop printing
dr o

to do with their printing diffi-
culties.
Freedom
MSU has had a history of cen-
sorship, strict rules and supervis-
ion. However, campus liberals saw
a gleam in the light of freedom in
June when a faculty group issued
a statement calling for sweeping
revisions in MSU rules that would
greatly liberalize academic free-
dom.
The suggestions, now under
study, include:
-a student-faculty committee
on academic rights and responsi-
bilities of students;
-a restructuring of the State
News to end censorship;
-an office of Ombudsman to
handle grievances, and
-astudent-faculty judiciary.
Action on the report, which
must be taken by the faculty Aca-
demic Council and the Board of
Trustees, is expected some time
this winter.
However, the close of the winter
term saw a series of incidents
likely to dampen faculty enthusi-
asm for freedom for students, as
students were involved in several
rock-throwing rampages.
Letting off steam at the end of
the term, over 2,000 students took
part in the incidents, which started
with food fights and ended in
several arrests.

John Hannah, and other officials Students on The Paper charged+
testified on the MSU Viet Nam they were being "blacklisted," as
project. they had to go out of the state to
A public outcry had arisen ear- find a printer. They also suspected
lier because of an article in Ram- that MSU officials had something

The University of California's
Berkeley campus is "seething with
Communist and homosexuel ac-
tivity." according to the Burns
report, which was released last
May.
This report. by the California
State Senate Committee on Un-
American Activities, charged that
Communist-oriented students and
non-students h a ve mad de the
Berkeley campus the nationwide
center for the anti-Viet Nam War
movement.
It also charged sexuality and
sexual promiscuity are rampant,
and blamed the administration of
President Clark Kerr for letting
all of this come about.
Kerr Replies
Kerr, on the other hand, termed
the report distorted and inaccur-
ate, claiming it contained half-
truths and situations taken out
of context. He also offered to ap-
pear before the committee in an
open hearing, saying he had not

clusions drawn.
The report, called the Burns
Report after State Senator Hugh
Burns, chairman of the commit-
tee, mentioned with distaste such
activities as campus dances with
lewd themes and blatant promis-
cuity, and the presentation of "dis-
gusting, debasing spectacles."
Also at Berkeley last summer,
students solidly defeated a pro-
posal to free student government
from administrative control. Stu-
dents voted to turn back a pro-
posal to substitute an autonomous
student government not respons-
ible to the Academic Senate or the
chancellor for the preseft Asso-

been consulted on the accuracy of ciated Students organization and
the facts presented or the con- its constitution.

-

Study Hits ieriieiey ntuaenus

Illegal
Chancellor Roger Heyns had
said the proposed constitution
would have been illegal if ac-
cepted. Statewide university rules
say a student government must be
a branch of the administration.
The proposed constitution was
written by campus groups who felt
it would remedy what they called
"sandbox" student government.
one without any real power.
At Stanford University, David
Harris, a "radical," was elected
student body president. He said he
would seek to make student gov-
ernment autonomous in the typ-
of move that failed at Berkeley.

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I I

OSU Expels 10 For
Theft of Math Final

OMEGA
14K GOLD-FILLED WATCHES
schlanderer
*N so. uN*yCRS Iy
6 twr I,,.,

A janitor's susceptibility to brib-
ery and the money of over a score
N of Ohio State University students
led to that school's "worst exam-
cheating scandal" in its 96-year
history last June.
Ten students were expelled and
29 others disciplined for the inci-
dent. On the night of June 8, two
days before the stolen exam, a
final for freshman mathematics
students, was to be given, five stu-
dents took the first and third
pages of the three-page test from
a cabinet the janitor had un-
locked.
These they duplicated for sale,
receiving amounts ranging from
$4 to $50, although they asked as
much as $150 for the material.
OSU Executive Dean John T.
Bonner estimated as much as $300
to $400 changed hands in the
dealings.
Faculty Told
The day before the exam was
to be given a studentreported to
the mathematics department that
the exam was out. He was able to
describe enough problems to the
faculty to convince them he had
seen the test, so the department
quickly changed the exam they
* gave the students.
Bonner said the incident had
been confined "strictly to the
mathematics department. It was
a one-shot proposition."
He said that in keeping with OSU
policy; the names of students in-
volved would not be released. The
mathematics department actually
trapped students involved by the
manner in which they changed
the test.
Those who had access to the
exam were easily identified by
their answers, Bonner said, and
they all admitted their guilt once
questioned.
Those dismissed can apply for
readmission after one calendar
year, but Bonner indicated it is
unlikely any doing so would be
readmitted. The 29 students disci-
plined were placed on suspension,
10 and must apply to their respective
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colleges for readmission, but they
will be readmitted eventually.
As for the janitor, he has since
been dismissed. He complained
that although he was promised
$100 to unlock the exam, he only
received $43.

ANN 'IAitV* MICHItE A

You Meet
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NICEST
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