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September 20, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-20

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PAGE TWO

TlHE MICHIGAN DAIlY

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 20, 1966

I

Text

of

SACUA

Report

on

Student

Participation

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS. ) pation, the great value of in- oral reorganization of the advis- Iraduates as well as undergradu- curricular, and professional activ-1
I. We were encouraged by the formal interaction of students ory committees is sound, and we rtes. ity than the less effective groups,
substantial number of formal with faculty and administrators are optimistic that these com- Other Groups 'White Paper'
channels of student participation! should be stressed. Without ques- mittees can play a meaningful The effectiveness of other stu- There is no single group within
within the University, and by the tion this is the primary way in :ole. With the exception of these dent groups varies being deter- the University (with the possible
apparent effectiveness of many which student interests are made groups there are no formal stu- nined primarily by the quality 1exception of the Graduate Student
of these organizations. On the known. There is substantial evi- :i-ent advisory groups of impor- of their particular leadership. Council) that is equipped or or-
other hand. there are great gaps dence that informal contact and tance at the University level. Many of them have made great ganized to assist in the growth
otherudhandatherepareogeatdgahe the resulting influence of indivi- While there probably is no need contributions to the University i and development of departmental
in utudpnt participation, and the3andelomtofepretlI
effectiveness of much of the stu- dual students at this University? for permanent student advisory {oth ideas and service. All suffer student organizations. There is no
dent's endeavor must be rated is far below what it has been in ommittees to meet with the oth- in varying degrees from frustra- line communication between these
i,).. T ~r formal and in- tl ast, or ideally should be. er Vice Presidents, there is clear- tion. They feel that their work sorganizations. Until the survey
formal contnct between students. Many if not most of the stu- ty a need for regular contact and unappreciated. and that they lack made by this Committee there
faculty and administrators is dents at the University fail to exchange of ideas. satisfactoroy lines of communica- was not even a cataloging of their
inadei tr v( or4nprnAlnt imnor- levelop a close relationship with SGC tion either to other students or existence.
tance in devoianino studont in-any faculty member or adminis- The Student Government Coun- to faculty and administrators. There is need for a University-
volve ;nt i the n "'d for clear trator. A large number of faculty cil has potential authority to be C. Student Participation in wide group to be concerned with
ad contirn i snnort by the fn- and administrators apprently a strong student government in Schools and Departments. assisting the less developed de-
c111tv m mbrs ith"h" the in- disclaim responsibility e stu- the University. Its principal Student participation in the partmental and school organiza-'
dirrllnr --«nn a r+Y4. Th4 dent outside of the classroom and drawback has been that it has. schools, colleges and other aca- tions. In a University as complex:
nnt m H reular office hours. Student tended in fact to represent only demic units has not been widely as this there can be no "white
hasr throinnh thr cunseling is potentially a great the undergraduate segment of the recognized within the University. paper" to describe the proper form
di-'nta" & 4,f rmration. and sur of feedback to faculy a student body. The Student Gov- In an effort to gain information or nature of a student organiza-
by the 'r't4"-' r 'ht .-a. ernment Council has the author- on this type of student participa- tion. Problems and interests with-
i4+r +h .r e" r'f t1 tiident's Committee did not ivestigate ity, among other things, to rec- tion, the Committee conducted in departments and units vary. At
this matter specifically, dissatis- ognize and withdraw recognition a surv y of denartment chairmen the same time there are substan-
Y ,,4.4 n., ;.^ faction with the various aspects from student organizations, to :nd school d-ans. tial common areas where joint
T . . .. ,;..t of the counseling program was make rules governing these organ- The Committee found 92 or- effort or support from an outside
:.+" -. ' - -expressed by almost teveryone izations, and to serveaas the ap-tions at the department or
ct'"l with whom th" Committee came pointive body for all student '"~~n ttedprmn rgroup would be valuable.
rti,, i -- "*e ""0-r t in contact. mch-ol lvell within the University II
.T"1,'s tonettO Pihyommittees. ofStudhnt
proetttnnth sen-e invnlvonnfnt is B. Student Participation at the In addition it is "To serve as ly 2 of the 92 uncovered by the Philosophy of Student
~ rm' . ''hi1ttv f fa~ib University Level. Patcpio
y nrd edmA '"y v racr thi Formslchannels of student the official representative of the C-mmttee were registered with
repont mn+ ncWh i -arcatnhav aet University student community in th'- Student Government Coun-
rennrt ntok S r.Prthi snocific re- ?articipation have a le itimacy expressing opinion and interest cil as officially recognized student ucation which we have utilized in
commenatin. 'its mst imnr-which fosters good faith between to appropriate faculty, adminis- or nizationsI. making our recommendations is
tart crntribution can be to ro- parties, and provide a consisten- trative, and student agencies, and Thb Committ- was surpris-d based on three major premises:
motesn attitiidP and environ- y in the expression of student to the outside student and the nd n~las by the number of or- (1) education takes place
ment 'vhenh 1 i'11 nenlopraqe great.. concerns. In looking at formal world community." It has had owanisations within the University. both within and outside the
Pr orm s~sd' ifnr Alcn'ttet! hannels of student participation!Iti..;casom
er forme and informnal conte. nns stdent rip this power with a membership and the extent of their activities. classroom.
betwopn etudent. fpculty, and ad- the Committee distinguished be- that is now, and has traditionally While it is true that most of (2) placing responsibility in
insttn.een those facilitating partici- been almost exclusively under- these organizations were involved the hands of students is essen-
en enfisation at the University level, and graduate.rimarily in social and service tial to education,
111. WE B.ECA~bMMEN T TTTA1 those facilitating participation at rdae
1. ThE nrsity shl r the academic department or The Graduate Student Council 'unctions the results do show (3) a "community spirit" and
1. Th University should reco-h dm dphas no formal status within the that it is possible to have invol- adequate flow of information is
nize the need for active student , chool level.
pnrizA t need 'at all leves of sUni-shl lEvecv.University, other than that of emerit in academic matters at criticel to the decision making
paymr tnffrn'st An levels of Uni- Effectiveness one among many recognized stu- th department level. process of the University.
versity affairs. An indisnefsably; Passing judgment on the ef- dent organizations. In practice The effectiveness of this invol- (1) The E:lucational Exper-
rpauirement is that the faculty c'-eness o stuident n-rticina-the Graduate Student Council has veient is again difficult to jud-e. ience-
scknowled that its oblition to tion is difficult, but a few conclu- emerged in the last few years as the department heads were ask- It is our position that the pur-
students Pand stunt activities sior's can be made. 'In imstancesan effective voice of graduate ed to rive their opinion, and most pose of education is to stimulate
extends beyond the clsaroom. Phere responsibilities are clearly students. It has been" primarily thi'tt that the student groups in each st;udent maximum intellec-
2. A Joint Advisory Council delineated, and the committee concerned with academic poli- lid very well in holding social tual growth and to develop in him
should be established. Members or board functions on a regular! ies, but has been increasingly functions; but with few excep- the character and abilities neces-
should be drawn from the faculty basis, student influence can be involved in other University-wide ;ions they rated the effectiveness sary to become a contributing
assembly;and; the graduate and both substantial and effective problems such as parking, hous- of the groups in carrying out I member of our society. Specifical-
underoraduate student assemb. nTas -he variculsrl true in the ing discrimination, and voter re- ;hrir activities as rn-dium to low. ly. the University educational ex-
lies. The council should advise o case of the various Regent .re- gistration. There is nothing to \mong those receiving medium to ?:tence should :
University wide substantive prob- ated boards mentioned above. It prevent graduate students from high ratings were the Economic a. Develop the student's intel-
lems. and by the central commu- was found that often students' cunning for Student Government 3ociety. the Psychology Graduate lectual curiosity and expand the
nications link between various le- views are of a major, if not Council in a University-wide elec- Student Committee, and the Na- range of his intellectual concerns.
vels in the University, primary influence on policy deci- ion, but the likelihood of this val Science Taffrail Society. b. Develop the. student's critical
3. A new student government sions of these boards. taking place seems slim. Gradu- Interviews with officers of faculties-his ability to compare,
structure should be establshed The effectiveness of student ate students are oriented princi- these and other student groups criticize, evaluate, and choose.

which are appropriate to a demo-' and influential role in University lowed to take his place as a full
cratic society. affairs. This interest on the part participating member of the Uni-
These goals cannot be met by : of these active students is to be versity community, and be expect-
emphasis solely on the classroom applauded. The University should ed to participate fully in decisions
and its activities. As stated in the not have an attitude of making affecting his welfare. He should
Reed Report: reluctant concessions to student be concerned with, and directly
"College is not preparation for demand, but must recognize that linvolved in, the total life of the
life. It is life itself--life at one active student participation is a community. He should help form-
of its most vital moments. For valuable part of education. It is ulate and enforce the rules he is
the young person, college is a student apathy that is to be de- expected to observe, and have the
period of critical moral decision |plored, and student involvement opportunity to influence all phases
1where a. character_ .._ _ .is _shaped y of rni u'e sin

14

where a character is shaped t
more to a personal decision than
to the dictates of family or other
outside authority."
(2) Student Involvement as Part
of Education-
There is evidence of discontent
on the part of many students, and
aspiration for a more meaningful
Dial 2-6264
These roles gave
LIZ her reputation!
e- _

that is to be stimulated.
The University community is
pervasive in the life of the student.
This is particularly true in a resi-
dential University such as Mich-z
igan. As part of the educational
process the student should be al-"

or the University's life.
(3) The Student in the Univer-
sity Community-
Our University is extremely
complex. Its members are divided
into groups according to the roles
See SACUA, Page 8

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PAUL NEWMAN
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JACK CARSON 109H ANDERSON
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consisting of. (a) an Undergrad- participation wanes, however, in "
uate Assembly, (b) a Qraduate groups where the function is not
Assembly. and (c) a Student Exe- clear, or where the group oper-
cutive Committee. The new stu- ates on only an informal basist
lent assemblies should have the and the chairman or other offi-
powers and functions of the cur- cial assumes the duties and res-
rent Student Government Coun- ponsibilities of the board or unit.C
il1, and in addition be given au- An extreme case is the Commit-
thority to formulate rules govern- tee on Public Discussion, wherea
ing student behavior, his year no student members
4. Student participation at the have even been appointed.V
departmental and school level Student Responsibilityc
should be promoted. Students If students have neither res-
should be actively involved in ponsibility nor influence, their in-
academic matters within their de- terest in serving in an advisoryf
partments. rapacity cannot be maintained.4
5. The office of the Vice-Presi- The Committee discovered sev-
lent of Student Affairs should eral examples in the past when
have status and authority equal students had been invited to par-
to that of the Vice-President for ticipate on committees. but had
Academic Affairs and the Vice- not taken advantage of the op-
President and Chief Financial portunity. An example of this was
Officer. His office should orient the invitation to students to at-
itself to a greater extent to the tend various meetings of SACUA
problems of all students-gradu- Committees. In most of these cas-
ate as well as undergraduate.. es students were invited to do no
6. Effort should be made to more than listen, and their views
avoid unnecessary secrecy and to and opinions were not taken ser-
improve the flow of information lously, or even desired.
within the University. This is a There is also evidence, howev-
responsibility of both the sources er, that students themselves lost
of information and the media of interest in participation once the
communication, initial battle had been won and j
7. Among the substantive prob- the opportunity of attendanceI
lems which should concern the gained. With few exceptions stu-
Joint Advisory Committee are (a) dent participation has been suc-
to seek ways to motivate and pro- cessful only where there has been
mote student involvement in Uni- continued active encouragement
versity affairs, and (b) to investi- by the administration or by fa-
gate methods and determine the culty members.
proper role for the student evalu- It is. still too early to judge the
ation of teaching. effeetiveness of the AdvisoryI
Committees being established un-I
The Current Situation ier the Vice President for Stu-
It is reported that the origihal dent Affairs. We believe the gen-
charter of the University of Mi- ~_~
,higran passed in 1837 nrovided

pally to their specific academic
inits, and' their involvement inI
University affairs comes from
that base.
Undergraduate students, on the
other hand, are not as likely to
be oriented towards particular
academic units or departments,
but tend rather to align themsel-
ves on the basis of interests which
cut across departments or schools.I
k. Student Government Council
;hat purports to represent the
students of the University must
find a device to incorporate the
views of increasing numbers of
Phone 482-2056
EntAWe Or CARPENTER ROAD

indicate that their effectiveness c. Develop the student's sensitiv-
is due in large part to their active ity to and appreciation of the
support by the chairman of the creative arts.
department and by at least some d. Develop and increase the stu-
of the faculty. Without depart- dent's own creative faculties.
montl sunnort, student organi- e. Develop the student's social
zations survive only with diffi- sensitivity.
culty. f. Develop the student's ability;
Secondly, the effectiveness of to relate to and work with other
the organization depends upon the people and groups.
degree of their involvement in de- g. Develop in the student a sense
partmental affairs, and on the of responsibility and a set of values
amount of responsibility they are -
given by the department. The
more effective groups tend to be
engaged in more of the academic,
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MICHAEL PARKS II

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for student participation in in-
stitutional management. While
this fact may be of more interest
as a curiosity than as authority
for present action, it does indi-
cate that the problems raised in
this report are not romnletely
new or unique. Throughout the
years students at the University
have played active and widely
varied roles in University affairs.
The Committee devoted substan-
tial. time to an examination of ex-
isting student participation. ;In
this section we will briefly report
on our findings as to the extent
and effectiveness of this partici-
pation.
A. Informal Student Contacts.
While this report deals prim-
arily with formal organizations
and vehicles of student partici-

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"A truly adult love story!
It is a beautiful film,
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presented by
The Student Sesquicentennial Committee
and
The Women's Athletic Association

FRIDAY, Sept. 30

. ... 8:30 P.M.

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