100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER. 15, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGS S

pSE E 1IC-

PAGE SEVEN

I, ,

Offensive

Line

Re1

By HOWARD KOHN
Graduation had put it there.
"There was going to be a weak-
r ness," gleefully scribbled the ex-
perts in their magazine previews.I
This year was going to be some
cheap alloy metal holding togeth-
er the iron framework which once
was Michigan's immalleable of-
fensive line.
.Pro draftees Tom Mack. Char-
lip Kines and Steve Smith were;
gone. Mack and Kines had been
the two tackles so anti-social they
wiped out any defensive lineman
who want d. to meet un with, the
Wolverine backs, anduSmith had
been the rangy end who was us-
ually too busy catching passes and
decoying defenders to notice.
Even the Michigan coaches had
to agree that there was more to
finding replacements for the three
than filling in new names in the
lineup.
But heroes are made, not born.
Screen Stars
So M'chiqai's two offensive line
coaches-Tony Mason and George
Mans-started screening and test-
ing the greenhorn linemen and
ends. This Saturday the men chos-
en to fill the role will have their
first chance to fet into the mo-
vies'- game films of Michigan's
clash with Oregon State.
"They can be as good as they
want to be, and they want to be
good,' says a confident Mason,
coach of the interior line. Mason
is the kind of guy who likes a
challenge, and he doesn't often
get snowed by it.
His choice for the "pulling"
tackle is Jim Hribal-a non-let-
tering senior who's shown "poise
and toughness" in practice, while
his pick for the other tackle slot
is Ray Phillips-a junior who's
"smart and doesn't make many
mistakes."
"They've shown me they can
do the Job and as far as I'm con-

cerned, they're not going to be a
weakness," asserts Mason.
"Their attitude is good and they
have been working hard. Now
we'll just have to wait until game
time."
End-to-End
Mason's concluding statement{
correlates well with Mans' half-
warning, half-daring words about
his two assignments-tight end
and split end.
"We're ready for anybody, and
we're anxious to see what Oregon
State is going to do this week-
end," smiles a likewise confident
Mans.
Of course, leading the list of
pass-receiving proteges is record-
breaking, All-America Jack Clan-
cy-captain of the Michigan elev-
en.
"Jack is a real leader and hus-
tler . . . the kind of player the rest
of the team respects. What has
continued to impress me is his
willingness and drive to improve,
no matter what the record books
say," praises Mans.
The 6'1", 192-pound Clancy
worked out twice a day during
most of the summer, catching aer-
ials off the fingertips of starting
quarterback Dick Vidmer and pol-

ishing his pass patterns. In addi-
tion, he visited the Lions 'train-
ing camp in Cranbrook to watch
the moves of the pros.
Clancy will start at split end.
But while Clancy rides the crest
of his wavemaking season, threat-
ening to wash out anyone who tries
to beach him, the pessimistic crit-
ics point out that tight end Smith
has left and that heir-apparent!
Tom Pullen has been shelved by'
an injury.
Meanwhile, Clayt Wilhite, who
started out the fall as a second-
string offensive end after being a
backup man on both sides of the

Aaces Lost C
)line last year, changed quickly in- Backing up Wilhite will be ;
to a "blueshirt." sophomore Warren Sipp, termed
"Clayt's definitely improved a "very pleasant surprise" by
since last spring. He's rightfully Mans, and junior Tex Spencer.
earned a starting berth," com- No Change at Guard
ments Mans. Michigan's two ends will line
Depth-wise ,the split end slot is up alongside two returning let-
currently four-deep and the tight terman guards who were "in" as
end is three-deep, soon as fall drills began.
Senior Stan Kemp-Michigan's Don Bailey, the hardblocking
punting specialist who just recov- senior from the Pennsylvania coal
ered from an injury, junior Jim mines, will start at one guard
Berline who played baseball last position, while Henry Hanna will
spring and sophomore Derrick open at the other spot.
Humphries stand behind Clancy. "Bailey has the potential to be
Kemp and Berline are about one of the best guards in the Big
even in the battle for the "gold- Ten, if not in the country," points
shirt" spot, according to Mans. out Mason.

I'I
o1d
Depth at the tackle positions is
likewise pretty much static.
Pete Mair is behind Hribal after
losing out in his bid for a first-
string role, and soph Bob Penska
is the number one substitute for
Phillips.
Anchoring down the middle of
the line is an almost inconspicu-
ous bulwark called Joe Depend-
able, or more formally Joe Dayton.
The senior center played 275 min-
utes last year in the form that
Mason describes as "consistent."
"He's done exactly the job that
we've asked of him," explains Ma-
son.
His sub will be Jerry Danhof,
another senior.
Michigan's line just may be a
metallic patchwork job, as the
critics claim, but the melting pot
of a game could be enough to fuse
together a high-resistance wall.

ERA TERNITY

QU ICK KIICKS.

In case either Bailey or Hanna'
should get sidelined, Mason has
Dick Yanz who "can fill in at
either place." There are a num-
ber of other guard candidates who
could be used if the need arises.

HERMAN FRANKS, balding CASSIUS CI AY, current world
manager of the San Francisco heavyweight title holder, has
Giants, has been rehired for the agreed to lay his title on the line
1967 season in a front office move against CLEVELAND WILLIAMS,
to bolster the Giants pennant ranked fourth among heavy-
hopes. Terms were not disclosed weights, in the Houston Astrodome
but the $50,000 mark was rumored. this November. Clay, however, may
be forced to postpone the fight
due to a possible bone fracture in
his right hand suffered during the
KARL MILDEnBERGER fight.
.,,. Examinations are underway.

"TH E NEW ADLER J4"

___.... _ T

I

HE NEW

I

aIELE P J-4

By Ilowa

rd Kohn

i
t
I

Just how long do you think a two-man foootball team could l
hold out against a full seven-member squad-no strings attached?,
Some years back, a pair of wide-ranging, sideline straddlingt
intramural i ayers at Michigan matched quality against quantityt
and almost wiped out some cherished gridiron theories.
Outnumbered but not out-classed, the duo shot into a 7-6 lead1
and held it until the final moment of the game before being'l
dropped 12-7.
It could only happen in intramurals.
Michigan's program is entering its 55th year in the tradition f
that "learning game skills in college results in a lifetime of en-
joyment from being able to play the game well.,"
That may sound over-dramatized, but in a 1937 a young fresh-
man from Gary, Ind., won the annual award for All-Around Ath-.
lete in intramurals. His name was Tom Harmon.-
Elmer Mitchell got the IM system on a sure-footed basis att
Michigan in 1921 after ithe idea had slipped in and out of the scenet
for the previous 60 years.
Mitchell guided the program until 1943 when present Intramural
Director Earl Riskey assumed the reins.I
In the 55-year span, increasing participation culminated t
into last year's S6-sport slate open to every non-varsity athlete 1
on campus.
However, the loss of two fields to the new All-Events build- t
ing combined with the incorrigibility of the trimester program 2
has phased softball out of the schedule for this fall.
Along with 'A' and 'B' grid play, there will be four other fall r
sports on the 1922 fare. Golf, tennis, track and cross country
join the sport which the Detroit Lions play for kicks and 1
Michigan State plays for keeps.
Tennis matches this week opened IM action, while, golf will wait:
for the weekend of September 24-25, track for Sept. 27 and 29 and'
cross country for Actober 6.
There will be team competition in each of these sports even
though the sportlight will be on the individual.
Once again, the ;sports will be played under Residence Hall,
Fraternity, Independent, Professional and Faculty divisions
with the exception of track and cross country which are left
for the long-winded quaddies and fraternity men.
Single thinciads, independent of teams, can also run in the
all-campus cross country jaunt.
So far, there's no record of anybody getting lost on the harrier
run, but there could always be a first time.
How long is it? Well, would you believe . . .

In the tight National League
pennant race, the current first
place LOS ANGELES DODGERS
play 11 of their last 18 games on
the road. They entertain the con-
tending PITTSBURGH PIRATES
three times at home beginning to-
night. The Pirates, carrying the
burden of a 15 game road trip
which began with the ASTROS
Tuesday night, follow their three
game stint with the Dodgers with
a four game series against another
contender, the SAN FRANCISCO
GIANTS, at Candlestick Park.
They then return home for the
last three game series against the
same Giants. San Francisco, with
the fewest games remaining of the
three top teams, 16, plays 7 of
them at home.
*+ A
REGGIE HARDING, the sus-
pended center of the Detroit Pis-
tons standing 7-foot tall and us-
ually in hot water, made another
plea for reinstatement yesterday
to the NBA. COMMISSIONER
WALTER KENNEDY of the NBA
met with Harding for three hours
in New York, but said he would
make a statement in a few days
concerning the status of the; pe-
troit giant:
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
GRAYLE HOWLETT

The ONE Portable that's
made for Everyone. See a
Demonstration TODAY.
DEALER'S NAME
Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Open Monday and Friday evenings 'til9
Arbor Adler BUSINESS MACHINES, INC.
217 S. FOURTH AVE 0 Telephone 663-2440
BIBLE SCIENCE CONFERENCE
with
DR. JOHN C. WHITCOMB, JR.
Dean, Grace Theological Seminary
SEPTEMBER 16-18, 1966
TOPICS
16th Friday night, 7:30-Genesis and Evolution
17th. Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-The Original Perfection of the World
17th. Saturday, 7:30 p.m.-The Creation of Adam & Eve
18th. Sunday, 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.-The Flood & the Final Judgment
18th. Sunday, 9:45 a.m.-Modern Science & Biblical Miracles
18th. Sunday, 6:00 p.m.-How To Defend The Bible
18th. Sunday, 7:00 p.m.-The Flood and Modern Geology
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron
DR. RAYMOND H. SAKE, Pastor

I

I

CAPTAIN JACK CLANCY

Ma ;or ILeague
St~u?(Ia

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Baltimore 89 55 .618
Detroit 81 65 .555
Minnesota 80 67 .544
Chicago 76 72 .514
California 73 71 .567
Cleveland 73 75 .493
Kansas City 68 80 .459
New York 65 82 .442
Washington 65 84 .436J
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston. 2, Chicago I
Detroit 3, Minnesota 2
Kansas City 3, Cleveland 0
California at Baltimore (rain)
Washington at New York (rain)
' ODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at Detroit
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
Caliltornia at Baltimo'e (n)
Washington at New York
Chicago at, Boston
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet,
Los Angeles 8- 59 .590
Pittsburlh 84 61 .579
San Francisco 83 63 °.558
Philadelphia 79 68 .5:17
Atlanta 76 70 .521
St. Louis 76 70 .521
Cincinnali 71 74 .490
Houston 6 85 .426
New York 60 86 .411
Chicago 52 93 .359
YES'TERDAY'S RESULTS
Atlanta 3, Chicago 1 (10 inn)
Philadelphia 2, San Francisco 0
St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 2
Only gaines scheduled
1OIIAY'ti GAMES
Atlanta at Chicago
Pi sburgl at Los Angeles (n)
New York at San Francisco
only games scheduled

GB
9
101,
i5
16
18
23
261
261
1I!
3
7
10
10
14?,
24
26
33!

FASHION GUIDP
OddS FOR MEN

f14
Mock Turtle by Coventry.
100'% Australian Wool.
B I a c k, Caramel, Whisky,
Green, Honey, Lt. Blue, Dark
Brown, Navy. S, M, L, XL.
8.98

'1 / Ii !
jt 'i,
0 '.- \
'i / & ,u' ' f

100% all wool crossover.
Button tabs, puffed sleeves.
Navy, Black, Brown, Royal,
Kelly, Gold. S, M, L, XL.
18.98

100%Fl Virgin wool cable
stitch V-neck, by Alps. Knit
cuffs, buttom. Royal, Kelly,
Apple-Green. S, M, L, XL.
18.98

SWEATERS-WE HAVE 5,072OF THEM!

K

HAIRSTYLING
to Please!!
-CONTINENTALS
-COLLEGIATE
-RAZOR CUTS
--OPEN 6 DAYS-
The Dascala Barbers
(Near Michigan Theatre)
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
Grand Opeing
Sept. 23 & 24
A
1 TATUII? t QIrT yT

100% Virgin Lambswool V-
neck, Raglan sleeves, knit
cuffs, bottom. Black, Navy,
Dark Brown, Olive, Green,
Burgundy, Aurora, B r o w n,
Heather, Spruce Green,
Whisky.
9.98

.. :

. .
,, ;
f
111 t
;
it
._

I)
Ii

* {'
awII,
..J L { i a .! .
0, , f,1 1

i
I

Springtime is swingtime on a Yamaha sportcycle. So come on down
and see the new spring swinger, the Twin Jet 100. You'll flip, be-
cause the Twin Jet is a lotta sportcycle. 2 cylinders, 2 carburetors,
2 exhaust pipes, double everything in the GO department. The
styling is lean and low. It looksfast...and it is.The precise handling
is bred-in from the 250cc Grand Prix Champion Yamahas. Our
shop is the home of the Swinging World, so come on in for a ride
on the Twin Jet 100. It's so safe...if you can ride a bicycle, you
you can ride a Yamaha. Try one out for yourself and you'll see why
Yamaha, with proven oil-injection, is the top-selling 2-stroke in the
U.S.

Popular Alpaca stitch Cardi-
gan. Puff sleeves, knit cuffs,
bottom. Royal Blue, Black,
Bottle Green, Brown, Lt.
Blue, Kelly Green, 5, M,
L, XL.
18.98

100%5 Virgin wool, turtle
n e c k in fisherman's net
stitch. Knit cuffs and bot-
tom. Bone, B I a c k, Kelly,
Royal, Butterscotch. S, M,
L, XL.
19.98

REGIS TRATION
SEPT. 12 thru 19
ENGINE ARCH
DIAG
IIII \ fT g Gl g gg

Toad=w

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan