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September 11, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-11

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

l*Atl'w t tr ra r

..DY ETEBR,,168T E MC I AN D IYA~

PAGE SEVEN

.

Defense
By HOWARD KOHN make the
gesting a
Xt that moment when man de- n comp
ces he's reached utopia, football that some
coaches will chuck their black- cancel ou
Sboardsand stomach pills, send a It bord
lifetime of 'second-guesses on a jb
one-way mission and let the play-. ob.
ers run the team. Last sp
There's no sweat when no one Bump El
blpws his cool. tion on
ut until then, the coach must tape read
formatio
It sou
Michigan
games la
2-1 form
w Of cou
won the
previous3
an invol
establish;

to

e decisions, mentally di-
all the facts and figures
iter fashion and praying
e unknown factor doesn't
ut the solution.
ders on being a thankless
pring when Head Coach
liott fed in the informa-
Michigan's defense, the
d "change" - change the
n.
nded like a good idea.
had only won four ball
st year with the old 6-2-
ation.
arse, the Wolverines had
Rose Bowl with it the
year, and there would be
ved teaching process to
a new set-up.
Perspective

Elliott made the change. Why
did he do it? And what kind of
change is it?
Let's put it in this perspective.
Maybe people don't change, but
the people who play football at
Michigan do.
Elliott explains it this way. "This
season Michigan will have four
returning men in the secondary
instead of the veteran line it had
the last two years. So instead of
using the old formation which had
RICK VOLK three men in the backfield, we
SPORTS SHORTS:
Syracuse Upended

Jtilize
switched to a pro-type defense
with four deep backs."
Basically, the new formation is
the 5-2-4 similar to what the pros
have used since Papa Halas and
the Bonebreaking Bears made the
scene and initiated in college by
Bud Wilkinson during the reign of
the unstoppable Oklahoma split-T
powerhouse.
This "new" formation has been
around for awhile and-interest-
ingly enough-was at Michigan as
short as three years ago.
That was before the likes of
Tom Cecchini and Bill Yearby
made Elliott decide to go to a
six-man line.
Now Michigan is back with the
"Oklahoma," and the emphasis is
on the secondary. "This formation
gives the backs more opportunity
to adjust to varied offenses,"
Elliott explains.
When the opponents line up,
Michigan's defense can quickly ro-
tate to either a 5-2-2-2 or a 5-2-
2-1-1 or a 7-4 o to many other
fascinating numerical jigsaws de-
signed to puzzle an offensive drive.
Michigan Four
It's most striking resemblance
to the professional formation is
that there will always be four
backs in the lineup.
The Michigan Four-the play-
ers most responsible for the change
-are Rick Volk, Rick Sygar, Mike
Bass and John Rowser.
As a group, they could easily
have Michigan's opponents singing
"We All Live in a Sunken Subma-
rine" by the end of the season.
Critics rate 'them as "proven," and
Michigan's coaches will match
them with any other quartet in
the country.
Aerial Artist Bob Griese and his
flashy flankers from Purdue may
file a sabotage complaint with
the CAB after the Michigan Four
put on their show.
Stealing the Show
Volk led the Big Ten in pass
interceptions last year, which
isn't bad for starters.
In Friday's scrimmage, the four
had an average of 70 per cent
"good" plays on over 20 chances
each and missed only four tackles
among them. This is in compari-
son to the 50 and 60 percentages
the other Wolverine backs re-
ceived.
Jerry Hartman and Bob Wedge,
a pair of reserve pass defenders,
actually saw more action in the
Blue-White game getting ito 36
and 32 plays, respectively. But
each missed seven tackles.
Volk again led the RBI cate-
e A
¬ĘBillboard
.i'. . . ..... ?Gf}:AJ"n
The Tang Soo Do Karate
Association which presented
Master Sang Kyu Shim, a Black
Belt karate expert, in exhibition
last night will hold its first ses-
sion of the year at Waterman
Gym, 7 p.m., on Tuesday. Those
planning on attending should
bring their own equipment, con-
sisting of a towel and uniform
(gym suit). For any other infor-
mation, contact Dr. Ergun Ar,
president of the Ann Arbor-
University of Michigan TSD
Club at 764-0503.
* * * *
Anyone interested in rubbing
elbows with the football stars
as a manager and getting paid
$1.50 an hour, should contact
Earl Riskey in the IM Building.

i_

Returning

ticism for missing two calls Fri-
day.
The backfield, in fact, had the
most difficult time converting to
the "Oklahoma" since the four
starters had played under the old
system.
Rookie Linemen
Michigan's line, on the other
hand, has three new starters in
Tom Stincic, Tom Goss and Bill
Hardy and were instructed in the
formation in spring practice.
Doing most of the teaching was
Don James, former Florida State
assistant who migrated to Ann
Arbor to take over defensive back-
field duties in the spring.
He'd concentrated on this de-
fense while in the land of open
convertibles and open beaches.
Then, even though Elliott says
that player "personnel" was the
reason for the formation switch,
Michigan hired Y. C. McNease to
put the defensive line through its
paces under the "Oklahoma."
McNease came from Texas
Western where he also had worked
on the five-man line idea. "The
5-2-4 makes the job of the line
very simple," claims McNease.
"The secondary has to make all
the adjustments while the linemen
have to learn only five basic tech-,
niques. That way the defense can
be either 'pressing' or 'soft.'"
"So far, the boys have been
very happy with the change. They
are developing confidence in the
system and in themselves which
is what is needed to make the de-
fense work.
"In all of the schools at which
I've coached the 'Oklahoma' has
been used, and I think Michigan
has the players to make effective
use of it," concludes McNease.

Backs

Michigan. went through a light
workout yesterday, polishing up
both its defensive and offensive
formations and also concentrating
on kicking chores.
Elliott posted a few lineup
changes based on Friday's scrim-
mage. Paul (Chief) Johnson, the
game-saving hero of last year's
California game when he was only
a sophomore, has now slipped into
a third-string berth on the de-
fensive line.
His former high school team-
mate at Bay City Central, Ken
Wright, who had beaten out John-
son for a starting spot but then
tore a ligament in his knee, may
also miss the action.
The doctors are expected to give
the "word" on his knee sometime
in the middle of this week.
Two other defensive linemen-
Dave Porter and Dick Williamson
-frequently mentioned for open-
ing game positions during the
spring practice have also been
plagued with injury and illness
this fall.
So with the first game of the
1966 season now less than a week
away, Michigan lines up with new
personnel and a new formation
while the band plays in the back-
ground and the "Michigan Four"
plays in the backfield.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
GRAYLE HOWLETT
THANK YOU
U-M Barber Customers
and friends for your
patronage. We now
WELCOME you to the
DASCOLA BARBERS near
the Michigan Theater.
-Dominic Dascola
Michigan Lit '36

ALL (AMPUS BOWLING LEAGUE
Forming Now
OPEN INGS for Individuals and Teams
SEE GEORGE-
Michigan Union Bowling Lanes
7 p.m.-Midnight

.

r....r..

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

MIKE BASS

gory, picking up one for an inter-
ception and another for a fumble
recovery.
In the four-deep formation,
Sygar and Volk will play the pro
safety positions while Rowser and
Bass will take the two corner
slots.
Even with their pre-season
acclaim already ,on record, the
four still have wrinkles to be iron-
ed out of their play. Volk, the All-
American candidate, who calls the
set-up for each play, drew cri-

RANKFURT, Germany (RP) -
Cassius Clay successfully defended
his heavyweight boxing champion-
ship for the fourth time in 5%/
months yesterday, stopping Karl.
MIldenberger of Germany at 1:30
of the 12th round.
A 10-1 favorite, Clay experienced
cisiderable difficulty with the
German's left-handed style in the
early rounds, then began to shoot
straight rights and lefts to Mild-
enberger's face, flooring the ag-
gressive European champion three
times in open air Wald Stadium.
The u n b e a t e n, 24-year-old
c mpion from Louisville, Ky.,
sent Mildenberger to the canvass
in' the fifth, eighth and 10th
rounds and battered him with
both hands before British referee
Teddy . Waltham finally stepped
in and stopped the scheduled 15-
rounder.
4 sharp right cross floored
Mildenberger just before the bell
sounded ending the fifth round.
A left hook dropped the challenger
for the mandatory eight count in
the eighth and a right sent Mild-
enberger tumbling to the canvass
in the 10th, again just before the
bl sounded.
Mildenberger's southpaw stance
bothered Clay over the early
rounds, particularly in the third
and fourth When the German
scored with hard lefts to the head
and body. But after that it was
all Clay.
$I knew from the start he was
going to last a while," said Clay..
"I did not take any chances. I
never do. My best punch was me
left. He tagged me a couple of
times, mostly with his right.
"It was a tough fight. I hit
him with a couple of good punch-
eSk I had a chance to take him out
several times earlier.
"He was hard to get to and he
had a pretty good punch. He was
sharp. He was a real gentleman,
though."
Clay, who now has successfully
efended his crown six times and
s scored knockouts in 21 of his
26 victories, said his next defense
would be in "about two months"
against Cleveland Williams of
Houston, Tex., the seventh-ranked
contender.

The knockout was the third
suffered by Mildenberger in an
eight-year career. His over-all
record is 49 victories, three losses
and three draws.
Clay weighed 203% pounds to
Mildenberger's 194%/4.
Baylor Rolls
WACO, Tex. (A)-Terry South-
all threw four touchdown passes
and Kenny Stockdale tricked
Syracuse out of another score yes-
terday as Baylor crushed the
Orangemen 35-12 in a nationally
televised football game.
It was Syracuse's worst defeat
since losing to Illinois 34-6 in
1954. Syracuse was ranked No. 7
in the Associated Press pre-sea-
son poll. Baylor was unranked.
The Bears got two touchdowns
in the first period on Southall's
30 and 23 yard shots to Richard
Defee and Paul Becton.
In the third period, Stockdale
faked holding the ball for a field
goal try and passed 29 yards to
Charlie Wilson for a touchdown.
The Bears got their fourth touch-
down on Southall's 23-yard toss
to Pink Palmer and wound up with
Southall's 10-yard touchdown pass
to Bobby Green.
Southall completed 14 of 28
passes for 229 yards.
Syracuse put on a vicious rush
that held Southall to only one
completion in five attempts in the
second period, but couldn't hold
up in the high humidity resulting
from rain in the past two days.
The temperature was 77.
Floyd Little, the brilliant Syra-
cuse running back, led a 53-yard
drive to a touchdown in the sec-
ond period, running over from
seven yards out. He spearheaded
a 57-yard drive in the last min-
utes that wound up with him tak-
ing a three-yard pass from Jim
Del Gazio.
Little gouged 90 yards out of
the Baylor line in 19 carries. He
also caught four passes for 12
yards.
Baylor scored the most points
against Syracuse since 1954 when
B o s t o n University beat the
Orangemen 41-19.

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per month 662-5671

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STUDENTS
Grand Opening
Sept. 23 & 24
UNIVERSITY
MOTORCYCLE
SALES
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