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August 30, 1966 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

As Nation Seeks Equity in Filling Armed)

oAbrces

In the nation's search for equity
In manning the armed forces,
more and more people have pro-
posed some sort of lottery or uni-
versal service. Either men are to
be chosen by chance or all are to
be taken.
Secretary of Defense Robert
McNamara in a speech suggested
Inequalities in the draft might be
remedied "by asking every young
4. person in the United States to give
two years to his country," in uni-
form, the Peace Corps, or similar
service.
U.S. officials filling in on the
speech later said the secretary
was against substituting any ser-
vice for military service.
Desire To Serve
The officials stressed that Mc-
Namara's intent was to introduce
into the minds and hearts of young
people, particularly young men, a
feeling of obligation to serve in
some fashion.
They emphasized his use of the
word "asking" and "volunteer" to
throw down any impression that
he was suggesting some sort of

compulsory universal service for
young people.,
At the same time, officials said
that McNamara sees a new appeal
in a so-far stillborn program to
rehabilitate, medically and educa-
tionally, young men who cannot
qualify for military service even
though they have volunteered.
This indicated a new impetus
behind what the Army used to call
its "step" program-a plan to re-
habilitate about 15,000 young
would-be volunteers and bring
them up to physical and mental
standards which would permit
them to serve.
Officials discounted the liked-
hood of any legislation to back up
McNamara's proposal of service
for every young person, saying this
service is a moral obligation, not
one growing out of law.
They said McNamara had in
mind service in usch groups as
VISTA, local and state helping
agencies, and such private service
organizations as the Society of
Friends.
But officials at the University

Twenty-five Republican mem-
bers of the House, the so-called
Wednesday group of liberals and1
moderates, issued a position pa-
per declaring that the present
program of deferring college stu-
dents results in "inevitable dis-
crimination between the rich and
the poor." The paper also points
out the many changes within the
country since the law was written
in 1951 which might tend to out-
mode the present system and
make it entirely inappropriate.
The Republican statements as
well raise familiar issues:
-Whether it is fair to favor
those who marry early or who are
wealthy enough to attend college;
-Whether men with "trick
knees" now often exempted should
not be allowed to perform clerical
duties, and.
-Whether mental standards

should be lowered with the armed
services providing special teach-
ing for those below a certain level.
Hershey commented that he
sees some congressional election-
eering behind Capitol Hill's de-
mands for an investigation of the
Selective Service investigation.
One alternative the Republican
group and many others would
like discussed is a peacetime Ar-
my based solely on volunteers. Op-
ponents of this proposal Include,
however, most professional mili-
tary men. A voluntary system,
many claim, would work only if
military pay, fringe benefits, and
prestige are made commensurate
with civilian occupations. One un-
official estimate is that it would
take $6 billion to make abandon-
ment of the draft feasible.
A final alternative which sour-
ces say met with sharp opposition

from many of the members o
Pentagon study committee wa
idea of non-military opi
Though appeal on ideolc
grounds is high and endorsem
from Peace Corps and VIST.
ficials have been favorable, o
tions are being based on st
practical grounds.
It has been argued, for exam
that there are not enough
military jobs to fill the der
Further, the Peace Corps and
ilar programs might be dan
by making them a haven for
evaders.
It the United States decid
adopt a lottery or other coni
tive form of male youth se
it would be among one of a h
ful of nations in the world to
such a system. Universal cons
tion today is more the exce
than the rule.

'U' Sends Rankings
To Selective Service

THE NATION SEEKS the best way to determine who men in pictures like the above will be
drafted.

(Continued from Page 1)
but under past procedure the stu-
dent had to ask the University to
release the information.
Officials commented that stu-
dents will probably be given a
form in the future authorizing the
University to send class rank to
draft boards.
The University rushed every-
thing --allowing the students on-
ly two weeks to request the infor-
mation be withheld - because
they had not realized Selective
Service wanted the information
until they met with each other,
according to officials.
They had been expecting some
communication, they said. How-
ever, other schools, such as Mi-
chigan State University, had al-
ready informed their students of
the situation.
SGC's referendum on the policy
will probably be held near the end
of September. Edward Robinson
gave as a rationale for the vote:
"this is something that affects on-
ly students and it is thus some-
thing that they should decide for
themselves."
SOC had not actually voted on

whether to hold the vote, but this
is expected to happen on Sept. 15.
WSU's action not to compile
ranks next year came after meet-
ings between students and admin-
istrators and faculty.
Keast's position was that a last
set of class standings should be
compiled for those who had not
registered -for the draft examina-
tion because they expected to be
high in class standings.
WSU will continue to compile
standings of graduating classes.
Keast said "that the added em-
phasis on grades and class stand-
ings produced by the Selective
Service procedures intensifies sev-
eral undesirable features of our
present system of higher educa-
tion."
The fact that Selective Service
boards can simply go directly to
the students and force them legal-
ly to submit their grades and/or
legally set up new criteria for
deferments makes Keast feel that
the problem lies directly with the
fact that the school gives grades
in the first place. He advocated
study of a pass-fail system.

and elsewhere praised the idea of
giving two years of service in ei-
ther a military or civilian role.
Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs Richard Cutler emphasized
that a national service require-
ment should be universal and
apply toboth sexes. Cutler wrote
a lengthy proposal on thes ame
subject six months ago.
"So long as national security
permits - until such time as we
have a bona fide national mili-
tary emergency, there ought to be
a variety of service options of-
fered," Cutler said.
National Problems
"There is plenty to be done in
the world," he continued, "and we
have resources to do more than
we are doing. Nationally, we have
urban redevelopment problems,
inadequate education, the Appa-
lachia problem, all of which need
attention."
Cutler urged that some means
be found whereby individuals who
are, either economically or intel-
be penalized by the fact that they
lectually less privileged should not
have been more likely candidates
than others to be tapped for na-
tional service.
"We should have a system in

which persons who are able to go
to college do not gain doubly by
both avoiding the service and get-
ting the consequent economic
ting the consequent economic
awards and status privilege," Cut-
Ler said.
"For example, I could see some-
ne earning a Ph.D. in physics giv-
ing two years to his country with
little remuneration," he added.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-
Mass.) urged the consideration of
a draft lottery, as did other offi-
cials and educators.
But Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, di-
rector of the Selective Service
system, said a lottery was used
during World War II and "it just
didn't meet things."
Kennedy called for a general
congressional study for a generrrr
congressional study of the Select-
ive Service system with particular
emphasis on the feasibility of a
lottery. He said, "I feel that the
present system provides inequality,

provides a lack of certainty."
He said that under his concep-
tion of a lottery system when a
person reaches age 18 or 19 he
would register with his draft board
physical examinations would then
and after passing mental and
receive a number.
A drawing would be held and all
the numbers picked. Those drawn
first would be drafted first.
Under the present system, Ken-
nedy said, "those who have the
intellectual capacity or the boys
who have the economic resources
1o go to college are provided with
a deferment."
Calling this a built-in inequity,
the senator added, "I say that
under a national lottery there are
going to be inequities, but I do
say there are less."
The general said he has been
"worried about the exaggeration
of some individuals' inconvenience
when we ought to be thinking, I
think ,of national survival."

is immaterial
We have New and Previously
Owned books for all people

who want to

save

money.

STUDENT BOOK 9gRVIC9

III

1215 South University

761-0700

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306 SOUTH STATE
Welcome to I

MICHIGAN

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THE
W OMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

Welcomes you to campus and invites you

to participate in the

RESIDENT HALL SPORT DAY

.

Tuesday, August 30

A special meeting for University women will be held
at 9:00 a.m. in the lobby of the Women's Swimming
Pool.
All are welcome.
Learn about our clubs and events held throughout the

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. . . . . . . . . . .

school year.

" CONCERT DANCE ORGANIZATION
" MICHIFISH SYNCHRONIZE CLUB
" FOLK AND SQUARE DANCE CLUB
" FIELD HOCKEY CLUB
" GYMNASTICS CLUB
" CROP AND SADDLE
* BASKETBALL CLUB

* TENNIS CLUB
" GOLF CLUB
* RIFLE CLUB
" FENCING CLUB
" SPEED SWIM CLUB
* ARCHERY CLUB

MICHIGAN BANKARD
CoNiE UPBEAT MOCS
Available in all of Fall's prettiest colors

Plus various tournaments throughout the year.

. 4

r r .. r i f- _ r AM

i.

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