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September 09, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-09

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PAGE TWO

THE _MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTE RL&S.0INS

PAG. TO.TE...IGA .IL

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THEATRE -
Genet Play: Series of Illusions
Crystallizes Awesome Reality

Teacher Walkouts Close Down
Schools Throughout Michigan

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By ANN L. MARCHI0
"The Blacks" by Jean Genet is
a bitter play, crystalizing the
black-white conflict to an awe-
some reality.
But just which elements of the
play focus on that reality and
which reflect dry humor are not
that easy to determine. The entire
plot moves in a series of illusions.
The cast is entirely Negro, but
the stage-audience adorns white
masks and portrays a self-assert-
ing white court.
The rest of the cast dresses in
a shabby imitation of the courtly
apparel and is an obvious stereo-
type 'of their race This group has
the task of presenting a reinact-
ment of a white woman's murder.
They do so in order that the court
can condemn them legally, having
already condemned them infor-
mally.
As both sets move in their ob-
vious roles, the plot slowly re-
verses itself until the Negroes be-
come the vanquishers.
The imagery, swirling in com-
plicated paradoxes, justifies the

simplicity of the plot. For exam-
ple, one woman is named Virtue,
but she is a prostitute. And yet
she proves to be the one gesture
of love.
The language of the play is
poetically crude. At least twice
in the play the intensity of eno-
tion precipitates an isolated and
breathtaking incantation.
"Tar and feathers, died like a
rot, died like a dog, dyed in the
wool, died in the battle, hit. the
bottle, died in bed, cock-o'the-
walk. Hemlock!"
"The Blacks" is a popular off
Broadway production, performed
for the first time on Oct. 28,
1959 at the Theatre de Lutece in
Paris. Its first continental pro-
duction occurred May 4, 1961 at
the St. Mark's Playhouse in New
York.
Don Harms, candidate for a
Ph.D. in Comparative Lit, has
done an excellent job in directing
the production. His enthusiasm
for the play itself has been a
tremendous incentive for the rest
of the crew. The movement of the
players is so accurately timed that

it actually enhances the rhythm
of their speeches.
The casting of the play's 13
parts took five weeks. And al-
though many had little or no ex-
perience, the production does not
suffer. Charles Thomas, the lead,
vibrates in empathy with his part
and a surprising quality emerged
in the character of Diouf, played
by Byron Hendricks.
Also to be commended is Mark
Sedgeman, A & D, who designed
the cubistic set.
Ironically, the most apparent
message of the entire production
was adequately summed up in
Genet's dedication. He wrote, "One
evening an actor asked me to write
a play for an all-black cast. But
what exactly is a black? First of
all, what's his color?"

By Thle Associated Press
State officials yesterday inten-
sified efforts to end teacher work
stoppages which are disrupting
classes for nearly 21,000 Michigan
students.
Officials of Henry Ford Com-
munity College in Dearborn, a De-
troit suburb, called off registration
which had been scheduled for to-
day for an expected 12,500 stu-
dents.
Local 1650 of the American
Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO
has picketed the school for two
days in what it describes as "the
first college teachers' strike under
collective bargaining in the United
States."
Judge Victor L. Baum of Wayne
County Circuit Court scheduled a
hearing for today on a suit to
force the Henry Ford Community
College faculty back to work. The
school has about 150 instructors.
The suit for an injunction was
filed by the Dearborn School

Board which operates the two-
year college.
One college administrator, who
declined to be identified, said "If
you were to conclude from this
that classes scheduled to open
next Wednesday will also be de-
layed, I could hardly quarrel with
your hypothesis."

Labor Mediation Board rules on
unfair labor practice charges.
In Grand Rapids, Leo Walsh, a
hearing officer for the mediation
board, promised members of the
c i t y 's education association
Wednesday night that the board
will act as quickly as possible to
pave the way for contract talks.

WELCOME SABBATH SERVICE
FRIDAY AT 7:15 P.M. Sharp
Address by
NIKKI 'KLAYMA
former Hillel Vice President,
on her experience during her junior year abroad.
Oneg Shabbat will follow.
JOHN PLANER, Cantor
with THE H ILLEL CHOIR
JOAN TEMKIN, Organist
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

*

Meanwhile, some 1,200 teachers In Detroit, the city's education
were to report for classes in Grand association revealed Wednesday it
Rapids, working without a master has petitioned the mediation
contract. Negotiations for a con- board for a new election to deter-
tract were stalled in the West mine who will represent Detroit's
Michigan city until the Michigan 10,000 teachers,
~ --

THE BLACKS
Genet's provocative and frightening play
duced by the Department of Comparative
with an all-Negro cast.

1429 Hill Street

All Are Welcome

. . . pro-
Literature

11

."."-""

Across Campus

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Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
1966-6 7 Season
* Enter Laughing-September 15-17
" Raisin in the Sun-December 8-10
. The Devil's Disciple-March 2-4
" Guys and Dolts-April 19-22
* Come Bach, Little Sheba--May18-20
SEASON TICKET PRICES'
First 12 Rows:
Thursdays $7; Fridays and Saturdays $8
All Other Seats:
Thursdays $6; Fridays and Saturdays $7
mm m---- mm- mi --mm--------m-n -mm------m w------w i .

This Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 8, 9, 10
Trueblood Auditorium
8:00 P.M.
Tickets at box office ($1.50, 1.00, .50)
Open 10-5 and till curtain on performance days
WiA Iipyin Ee ehe aegi?

Jg~ i WI

"Everything about 'A Shop on Main Street' is just right.
What more can be said in praise!"-Michigan Daily

I

FRIDAY, SEPT. 9
7 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema Guild
presents "Fires on the Plain," Ich-
ikawa's .study of psychological ob-
sessions in medieval Japan, in the
Architecture Aud.
7 and 9:15 p.m.-Cinema II pre-
sents Sidney Poiter in "A Raisin in
the Sun" in'Aud. A, Angell Hall.
8 p.m.-The University Players,
is sponsoring the Porch Players in
William Saroyan's "The Cave
Dwellers" in the Arena Theater on
the first floor of the Frieze Bldg.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Comparative Literature presents
"The Blacks," Genet's provocative
and frightening play, in the True-
blood Aud. in the Frieze Bldg.
8 p.m.-"The Driving Wheels,"
blues band, is appearing in concert
at the Ark coffee house, 1421 Hill

DIAL 8-6416
Shows Tonight at 7 and 9 P.M.

bor Tang Soo Do Club present a
free karate demonstration by 20
men and women in the Ann Arbor
High School gym.
8 p.m.-"The Driving Wheels,"
blues band, is appearing in concert
at the Ark coffee house, 1421 Hill
St.
8:30 p.m. - Canterbury House
presents folk singer Michael
Cooney at 330 Maynard St.

Hello Jere?
V

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Goodbye dare!

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER
'BEST FOREIGN
FILM OF THE
YEAR!"
"Masterful! One of the great films
of our time!"-Cue Magazine
"Marvelous to behold! One of the
important films of this year!"
-N.Y. Daily News

*

o,

I

OrderI
Youri
Subscription
TodayI
764-0558 1

Box office opens at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 12
at Trueblood Auditorium, Frieze Building,

r-- - - ---- .._

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It

CINEMA 11

St.
8:30 p.m. -
presents folk
Cooney at 330

Canterbury House
singer Michael'
Maynard St.

for individual ticket sales for "Enter Laughing".
R !
! 1
I I
'Season tickets also available at the box office. :
I

SATURDAY, SEPT.10
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Tom Courtney and Mi-
chael Redgrave in "The Loneli-
ness of the Long Distance Run-
ner," a bitter, biting study of the
physical and emotional confusion
-of adolescence, in the Architec-
ture Aud.
7 and 9:15 p.m.-Cinema II pre-
sents Sidney Poitier in "A Raisin
in the Sun".in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
8 p.m.-The University Players
is sponsoring the Porch Players
in William Saroyan's "The Cave
Dwellers" inthe Arena Theater
on the first floor of the Frieze
Bldg.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Comparative Literature presents
"The Blacks," Genet's provocative
and frightening play, in the True-
blood Aud. in the Frieze Bldg.
8 p.m.-Detroit Tang Soo Do
Association and U-M and Ann Ar-

U

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of
1 1v '3:00
9:55
.:.°'JOHN WILIAM
j! IIW1 NMIY SINRM
* . OUJAITHcEO ~I
,e .. PredbyIus MIQredD 4 yMNO ABBO
PLUS J H A N
JOHNFORD
".N >DoN6w1E
TVcIwY:.oR

i
4 ,
"HEFIRES ON H PLAIN "!
(dir. Ichikawa-1959)
Japanese, Subtitles. Ichikawa's study of psychological obsessionsN
a in Medieval Japan. One of the greatest Japanese films
by an oftentimes over-looked major director.
w I
SHORT: "WEDDING FEAST,' unanimous first prize at Locarno
Friday. . . Architecture Aud. 50c;
fI
Im inmmm--m-inm -m mmm ---nmmmmin mm-nmw"'""'i i'"m''""''"'"'""m m ""n"" "'""""""" I

presents
A RAISIN
IN HESUN-
Sidney Poitier's finest film!
By far his most dramatic,,
'versatile performance.
F R I DAY, SAT UR DAY, & SU N DAY
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
t. 9, 10, 11 Admission:
nd 9:15 P.M. 50c
SHORT: Jules Feiffer's 'Munro"
(Academy Award, 1961)
. Required Program Information: 663-5832

I MARI AIL[

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Sep
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STARTING SUNDAY
"THE OSCAR"
Stephen Boyd-Elke Somme

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