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September 07, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-07

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A'GIE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY} SEPTEMBER 1, 1960

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1985

__ _ _ ._Y _ . , ..,.,..

F

APA Fall Festival Premieres
'School for Scandal' Sept. 20

Arts Chorale Begins Rehearsal
With Increased Membership

Dial 662-6264
UT&T E um

"THIS PROPERTY
IS CONDEMNED"
PIus
"A NEW KIND OF LOVE"

V

THEATRE

STARTS TOMORROW

"School for Scandal", the witty'
satire on gossip-mongers, will
launch the 5th Anniversay Fall
Festival of the APA Repertory
Company for the. University's Pro-
fessional Theatre Program on
Sept. 20.
The sparkling Sheridan comedy
will present Helen Hayes in her
first role as a new member of the
APA, and Rosemary Harris, win-
ner of the Tony Award as Best
Actress of the New York 1966 sea-
son. Ellis Rabb will direct the pro-
duction.
Mr. Rabb's staging of "You
Can't Take It With You" won a
Tony nomination for Best Direc-
tor of the Broadway season. The
Restoration romp will be the first
of a seven play season by APA
from Sept. 20-Nov. 6 in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
First Presentation
In 1962 "Scandal" inaugurated
the opening of the Professional
Theatre Program in Ann Arbor
with Miss Harris playing "Lady

Teazle" under Mr. Rabb's direc-
tion, in the first of the success-
ful seasons of APA residency at
the University.
During the succeeding years of
sponsorship by the University, the
APA has grown into "the leading
repertory company in the nation"
according to Life Magazine. The
National Foundation for the Arts
gave the Company a $125,000
grant this year to expand its work
in the theatre.
"School for Scandal" will also
open the Broadway season of the
APA, following the Ann Arbor en-
gagement. It comes to the Univer-
sity from a brilliantly successful
run in Los Angeles where APA has
been hailed by all major Holly-
wood critics, with standing room
only attendance.
Popular favorites and new mem-
bers of the APA Company will in-
clude Rae Allen, Joseph Bird,
Patricia Margaret Connolly, Clay-
ton Corzatte, Keene Curtis, Anita
Dangler, Gordon Gould, James

Greene, Jennifer Harmon, Rose-
mary Harris, Helen Hayes, Nichol-
as Martin, Betty Miller, Donald
Moffat, George Pentecost, Ellis
Rabb, Marco St. John, Nat Sim-
mons, Joel Stuart, Dee Victor,
Sydney Walker, Paulette Waters,
and Richard Woods.
The second APA offering of the
Professional Theatre Program Fall
Festival will be the premiere
of "Three Mysteries With Two
Clowns," followed by Pirandello's'
"Right You Are" with Helen
Hayes in the role originated by
Eleanore Duse.
"We, Comrades Three," first giv-
en its World Premiere in Ann Ar-
bor in 1962, will be revised during
the Festival prior to a New York
premiere this winter. The final
two Festival weeks will be given
over to the premiere of Jean-Paul
Sartre's "The Flies."
Subscriptions for the Fall Festi-
val are available at discounts for
reserved seats at the PTP Office
in Mendelssohn Theatre weekdays

By ANN L. MARCHIO
The Arts Chorale, a relatively
new musical opportunity for non-
music students, began rehearsal
yesterday under the direction of
Maynard Klein. Offered for the
first time two years ago when the
School of Music moved to North
Campus, the Arts Chorale became
an immediate success with both
singers and audiences, and its
membership has mushroomed from
37 to 130 vocalists in a year.
In its second year the Chorale
took the formidable programming
step of coupling the entire Mo-
zart "Requiem" with selections
from Haydn's "Lord Nelson Mass"
and Brahms' "Nachtwache". And
the audience responded enthusi-
astically to their production. In
addition to the Hill Aud. per-
formances, the Arts Chorale has
appeared, either as a whole or in
part, in Grand Rapids, Lansing
and Fenton.
Klein, a veteran choral educa-
tor, firmly believes that a worth-

while musical curriculum should
be offered outside the bounds of
North Campus. In support of this
belief, the Arts Chorale made its
debut. This term Prof. Klein in-
tends to continue directing major
works from the high classic
periods.
Experience
An enthusiastic member of the
Chorale can find additional mu-
sical experience in the . fichigan
Singers, a choir of forty chosen,
from the group.
A completely different repertory
is available in the Madrigal En-
semble of sixteen mixed voices. In
fact, the possibilities of the chor-
al organization are practically un-
limited. Prof. Klein adds that his
plans will go as far as his singers
want to carry them.
Rehearsals for the group will
continue all term every Tuesday
and Thursday from 3:00 to 4:30 in
Angell Hall Aud. C. Membersnip
is accounted for, in large measure,
by returning choristers, many of

whom began their fifth consecu-
tive term this fall. Prof. Klein has,
however, announced that a few
openings are available for quali-
fied voices. Anyone wishing to
audition should attend one of the
rehearsals.
Whimsy
Members of the Chorale feel
that Klein injects just the right
amount of whimsy into his re-
hearsals. His podium technique
proves that singing is particularly
fun in a sensitive, well-disciplined
organization. Several of his stu-
dents have even mentioned that
they view the hour and a half ses-
sions as an extra-curricular re-
lease, even through they receive
university credit for the rehearsals.
As the group warmed up for the
semester yesterday afternoon, it
was obvious to an observer that
the credit is hardly the major
concern of these vocalists; with
these students, the song's the
thing.

Wi 11y n E11.1 Iane~a

E;lodOll ereIdak

1

I

Goodbye dire!

f,-

USE OF DRAFT REJECTS:
Military Receptive to McNamara Training Program

----H O /c~n~ foenCin

er ect Lon m ?nodern Cooltncy
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WASHINGTON(AP)-The armed1
services appear receptive but some-1
what uninformed about Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara's
special program for training mili-
tary rejects.3
Army, Navy, Aair Force and
Marine spokesmen say they have'
not been told exactly how the
program will be carried out, but
they hope the Defense Department
will provide some details soon.
Special training of the rejects
is scheduled to begin in October
and traininig plans take time.
Allowances1
A big question, in addition to1
operating details, is how many1
substandard trainees each service
will be allotted.
This is the situation more than
a week after McNamara's an-
nouncement that up to 100,000
men a year previously disqualified
for duty will be taken into ser-1
vice and brought up to military1
standards.
The Pentagon has said the ef-1
fort, linked to antipoverty pro-+
grams, will involve in this fiscalI
year-which runs through nextI
June 30-40,000 men having the
equivalent of a fifth grade edu-
cation:4

The setup will expand to 100,000
in the next fiscal year with the
addition of large numbers of men
previously rejected because of mi-
nor physical defects. If these ail-
ments, such as hernia, can be
cured in about six weeks, the men
will be accepted..
Predictions
One source predicted that of the
first 40,000 the Navy and Air Force
will bet about 5,000 each, the Ma-
rines somewhat more than 7,000
and the Army the remainer.
The services haven't been en-
lightened about what they will
be called upon to do, or how, or
to what extent. But there seems
to be a general acceptance of the
idea among most military men.
The Navy and Air Force, which
in large part get the pick of the
crop among the nation's young
men-getting mostly volunteers-
give rather' surprising ratification
to McNamara's plan.
"I've heard no complaints about
the Air Force accepting rejects,"
one ranking officer said, "in fact,
many people think it's a hell of a
good idea."
Basic Training
The Air Force loses 3.3 per cent
of its recruits during basic train-

ing .This number failing to meetI
basic requirements compares with
the Navy's "washout" rate of 7
per cent and the Army's 1.5 per
cent.
"I'm not so sure our washout
rate will increase," an Air Force
officer said. "It may be to the.
contrary."
There are two categories of guys
who don't make it in the service:
those who could but won't, and
those who would but can't. We
may be getting a group of people
who, can, but who never have had
the chance to prove it," he said.
Many of the Air Force train-
ees may wind up getting on the
job training in such assignments
as supply clerks or maintenance
men. But some could qualify for
technical schools.
From a Navy officer came this;
reaction: ''I think there is a rec-
ognition that no service can be
an island unto itself. If the coun-
try is faced with formidable prob-
lems such as poverty and lack of
education, and the- armed forces
can help, they should.
Man in Uniform
"The value of a man in uniform
is not always related to his score
on a test," the Navy man ex-
plained. "Rather intelligent screw-
balls instead of the not-so-bright
boys are often the individuals who
can't adapt to the military life."
McNamara believes that. sup-
plementary or intensified training,
can profitably be provided to one-
sixth of the nation's 600,000 men
who fail annually to meet ac-
ceptance standards.

Pentagon manpower experts say
this expansion of available man-
power means some men classified
IA will not be drafted as quick-
ly. They estimate that 200,000 men
in the 2.3-million-man pool clas-
sified lY can be upgraded to meet
military requirements.
The lY category is a marginal
group which barely failed to meet
the lowest standards on intelli-
gence and aptitude tests.

Previously rejected draftees or
volunteers will enter basic train-
inig along with regular recruits.
If they fail to progress adequate-
ly, they may be re-cycled-that is,
set back a week or two to join an
upcoming unit for retraining. Or
they may be assigned for as many
as three two-week periods in spe-
cial training companies already
set up at army training centers.

PLUS

$

I

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PRUL JULIE
DEEUMED ANDREBJI

SUNDAY: Stephen Boyd-Elke Sommer "The OSCAR"

4-Iil

DIAL 8-6416
Shows Today-at 7 & 9 P.M.

"DEVASTATING! BRILLIANT! STUNNING!"
(Crowther, N.Y. Times)

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER
"BEST FOREIGN
FILM OF THE
YEAR!"

ALFRED
HITCHCOCR'S
'TORN
CURTAIN'
TECHniCOLOR9
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
Next
JEAN CONNERY
JOANNE WOODWARD
"A FINE MADNESS"
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

4

SUBSCRIBE

TO THE,
MICHIGAN DAILY

I

The University and
Its Changing Ways

"Masterful! One of the great f ilm~s
of our time l"-Cue Magazine
"Marvelous to behold! One of the
important films of this year!"
-N.Y. Daily News
"Everything about 'A Shop on Main Street' is just right.
What more can be said in praise !"-Michigan Daily

(Continued from Page 1)
been the gradual move, in resi-
dence hall financing power away
from the business office to the
Office of Student Affairs. This
move began in 1962 with the Reed
report on the reorganization in the
OSA.
It was virtually completed last
week when veteran residence hall
business manager L e o n a r d
Schaadt was named associate di-
rector of University housing. He
will take charge of- budgeting and
planning University housing which
was formerly handled exclusively
by the business office.
Similarly, a sweeping change at
the University goes on almost un-
noticed - the school's evolution
into a graduate dominated institu-
tion. "Our growth at the under-
graduate level is going to continue
to be less than at the graduate-
professional level," says Vice-Pres-
ident for Academic Affairs Allan
Smith.,
Freshman enrollment was about
4500 during the past two years and
declined, to about 4300 this year.
Smith expects "only a small fresh-
man enrollment increment in
1967.",
According to Smith, "Graduate
enrollment has increased about 5
per cent a year during the past
two years." A similar graduate in-
crase is planned for next year.
For example,-the Medical School
will have 210 students in its 1967
freshman class next year, up from
200 this year. "We think .the
growth of the University should
be concentrated in those areas
where only we can perform," says
Smith, explaining the increasing
emphasis on graduate education.
"When you get a faculty of the
caliber we've got they want to
teach graduate and professional
students. It's interesting that when
we ask the literary college if they
wanlt to grow they say no. But if
we ask if they need more graduate
students they say they can take
10 or 15," he adds.
Vice-President Smith says the
University is looking into ways of
adapting procedures to speed up:
the production of doctorates.
One hope is that the University
can provide more fellowship mon-
ey to graduate students. "That
way," explains Smith, "a graduate
student would only need be a
teaching fellow one to two years

take a heavier cotirse load and
graduate sooner.
"If we ever could find a way
to finance more graduate stu-
dentfellowships, the percentage
of post-doctoral instructors at the
undergraduate level would natur-
ally have to increase."
Smith adds that he would like
to make a major increase in teach-
ing fellows pay. They now get $5,-
200 a year, up $250 from last
year. "The teaching fellows are
still the softest spot in our pay
scale," says Smith. "Compared rel-
atively we are not as good there
is a lot of other colleges around
the country."
While University officials differ
on the most effective method of
making change, most prefer to
work quietly - out of the public
spotlight. The literary college cur-
riculum committee's recommenda-
tion for a "pass-fail" grading sys-
tem (see page 1) was not suppos-
ed to be made public until Mon-
day. "A premature story could kill
the plan," contended one admin-
istrator.
Despite the recent changes at the
University some, officials think the
school is behind the times. "I'd
like to legalize drinking in frater-
nities and sororities for students
over 21," says Director of Student
Organizations Duncan Sells. "If
the law is being openly flouted I
don't think we 'should have it.
Stanford made_ the change last
year."
The slow pace troubles other ad-
ministrators too; Says one:; "I'm
not sure there will'be any really
meaningful changes coming out
of the administration this :year.
We're a very -tradition-bound in-
stitution that just doesn't rush
headlong into things. The wheels
grind slowly."
Phone 482-2056
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