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September 01, 1966 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Seventy-Six Years of Editorial Freedom

VOL. LXXVI, No. 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1966

a' ~ ~hej91A
By Jim Tindall
U' Events Building:
Maybe December 1967
In the relative cool of the Ann Arbor evening the University
Events Building (basketball palace extraordinaire), shrouded in
shadows, gives one the appearance of the ruins of a miniature Coli-
seum. To my left I heard a Michigan man comment to his date
on the half-finished arena saying, "It's hard to tell whether they
are tearing this thing down or putting it up."
The "thing" is the. 6.7 plus million dollar fieldhouse, shaped
like the Stadium, that has been under construction for a full calen-
dar year. The building now stands "approximately 50% completed"
according to "Bud" Spence, of Spence Brothers Contractors, the
company doing the actual construction. The completion date has
been pushed back for assorted reasons and is now hopefully to be
ready for occupancy, knock on wood, in December of 1967 according
to Mssrs. Spence and H. O. Crisler.
Many students have actively and passively voiced their
concern over the lack of progress in the construction of the
building in which they buy $12.00 worth of stock every year
in the form of athletic coupons. Some of these students
blame the University in general, and, more specifically, the
Athletic Board for bureaucratic ineptness. It is to these de-
tractors that I dedicate this column.
Some mikht remember that the overdue replacement for Yost
"Fieldhouse" was to be "The House That Russell Built," and that
Mr. Russell would give audiences and hold court there in his senior
year. The processes of selecting a site, designing the building, and
setting up financial arrangements were all a little slow in getting
underway. For example, Crisler readily admits, "We lost a month at
the start by carefully examining seven sites before we settled on the
area next to the stadium;" however, the early delays seem to be
the only areas open for the slightest criticism by students
Once the actual work began, the University seemed to be almost
completely absolved from any responsibility for the delays, and no
one .is more anxious to see the building completed than Mr. Crisler
himself who makes a pilgrimmage to the site every afternoon to
$ inspect the day's work.
In addition to his administrative work in Ann Arbor,-
Mr. Crisler has begun intensive efforts to raise additional
money for the building in conjunction with the $55 million
fund drive by paying personal visits to wealthy alums. His
efforts are meeting with considerable success, and all
sizeable donations will be commemorated with an appropri-
ate plaque from a grateful University and Athletic Board.
In order to meet even the December 1967 goal, several features
will be ignored so that the Michigan basketball team, as well as
other winter sports, can move into their new quarters as soon as
is possible. This list includes: blacktopping the parking lot, finish-
ing the two extra locker rooms, lounge, landscaping, exterior light-
ing, trophy cases, stage, and canopy over the entranceway.
With regard to the completion date, the University signed a
contract with Spence Brothers to have the building finished on
May 2, 1967; however, according to Spence, "The University ex-

Elliott Hopeful as Michigan
Gridders Prime for Blastoff

By BOB McFARLAND last decade of Big Ten 'play. When
What the Wolverine gridders the pro'gnosticators find so many
could use right now is a nice sup- silver linings that the clouds are
ply of blasting caps. obscured, team morale seems to
Blasting caps? suffer, and year after year, the
Yes, to unleash the power stor- forecasters insist in jinxing the
ed in a stick of dynamite, a blast- returning champ thusly.
ing cap serves the purpose nicely. Attitude this season isn't both-
The 1966 Michigan squad con- ered by such problems. "Our prac-
tains an ample amount of explo- tices have been good in intensity,
sive forces, if only someone re- desire, and enthusiasm," Elliott
members to bring the caps. noted. The rugged opening ses-
Nearing the end of their two-a- sions have been productive, ac-
day drills for another season, the cording to the coaching staff, and
Wolverines appear to have the Elliott pointed to the good physi-
inherent ability to return to a spot cal condition of the squad.
near the top of the Big Ten heap. "We've been pleased . with the
The added extra which might practices, and we only hope that
set it all off could come from con- we can keep our present tempo.
ditioning, a fired-up mental state, The weather has been warm, but
or a brief respite from the dev- that does make for better condi-
astating knee injuries which have tioning," he added.
become almost a tradition at Ward, Fisher Return
Michigan. The explosive power comes from
Optimistic Outlook a potent offensive attack which
Head Coach Bump Elliott had ranked second in the Western
his mind on this potential as he Conference during 1965. Returnees
reviewed the first days of practice from that backfield include All-
yesterday. "We have to be opti- America candidate Carl Ward, a
mistic," he remarked about a flashy halfback who delights in
squad that lost 10 of 22 starters knocking huge linemen to the turf,
from last season. and Dave Fisher, senior fullback
"We'll be tough," Elliott con- who managed to smash through
tinued, "but you have to realize enemy lines with remarkable con-
we're a thin team. A key injury sistncy. losing only three yards all
or two, and we could be up against season last year.
it. Looking at the situation ob- The much-heralded return of
jectively. we, have to admit that Jim Detwiler must be viewed with
there are teams who look better some restraint. Starring as a soph-
than we do on paper." omore on the Rose Bowl squad, a
Too Much Silver knee injury removed him from the
One thing which the Wolverines fray after the MSU contest last
won't have to contend with this season, and the senior with full-
year is the stigma of being' de- back size and halfback speed is
fending champion, which has side- still recovering from the effects.
tracked many a good team in the Detwiler Improving

*That blasting cap could be per-
sonalized in Detwiler, and Elliott
said that "Jim is making prog-
ress, and the knee is strengthen-
ing. However, he still needs a lot
of practice. Detwiler won't be play-
ed until he's 100 per cent both
mentally and physically," he em-
phasized. The halfback has not
seen action in a live scrimmage1
yet,
"There's always the possibility
that he won't play this year," El-
liott concluded. "It's just a thingj
where you have to wait and see."
If Detwiler fails to improve,
playing opposite Ward at the oth-
er halfback spot will be junior
Ernie Sharpe. Sharpe averaged 4.1-
yards-a-carry last season in 18'
attempts, and performed well in
spring practice.
Vidmer at QB
The heir-apparent to graduated
Wally Gabler at the quarterback
slot is Dick Vidmer. He saw limit-
ed duty last season, after sitting
out all of 1964 with a broken leg.
Noted for his passing, the junior
could be the key to a return to
loftier heights if he is back in
top form..
Speaking of his field general
candidate, Elliott said, "Vidmer
j has been doing a good job... .a
fine job. Of course, he hasn't had
the chance to work much in scrim-
mnages as yet."
Rick Volk, Wolverine standout
in the defensive backfield, remains

an adequate replacement if need-
ed. Early practices have seen him
performing his customary role
though, with Vidmer carrying. the
burden of the signal-calling.
A trio of other quarterback hope-
fuls, John Thomas, Bob Kieta, and
Dennis Brown, lack experience.
"There isn't a great deal of dif-
ference among the three," Elliott
stated.
Moving Bullseye
As far as targets go, split-end
Michigan captain Jack Clancy is
one of the best moving bullseyes
in the game. His shifty moves al-
lowed him to snare 52 passes for
1762 yards and a Michigan rec-
ord for a receiver. Playing the
end position for the first time last
season, he performed like he had
invented the forward pass.
Clayt Wilhite, a senior, is cur-
rently the frontrunner for the
tight end position. Although a
bumped knee has hampered his
play, Tom Pullen is also vying for
the post left vacant by the grad-
uation of Steve Smith.
Few Mishaps
With the exception of Pullen's
injury, the sessions have been free
of any disabling mishaps, Elliott
reports. Stan Broadnax, a junior
tackle, suffered a head InJury on
a construction job this summer,
but he has begun running.
The offensive tackle positions
can also be added to the list of
See VETERANS, Page 3

JIM DETWILER, SENIOR Michigan halfback, is shown crashing
through the North Carolina line in a game won by the Wolverines
last year, 34-21. Detwiler, who was injured in the game and later
had to undergo knee surgery, is one of the question marks in the
Wolverine backfield this year.

1966 Roster

No. Name

I

FOOTBALL OUTLOOK:

Wolverines Face Powerful Slate

By DAVE WEIR
Except for an early season in-
vasion of Berkeley to meet Cali-
fornia's Golden Bears, the 1966
Wolverine football team will do or
die close to home.
Two other non-conference foes,
Oregon State and NTorth Carolina,
open the Michigan home season

since the 1965 Rose Bowl and
Oregon State has the potential to
revenge Michigan's 34-7 runaway
in that classic.
The Beavers have an All-Amer-
ica candidate at fullback in Peter
Pifer, the nation's fifth leading
ground gainer last year. The back-
field is further strengthened by

I

be an improved team over the one Head coach Jim Hickey has
which compiled a 5-5 record last standouts at almost every line po-
year. With a potent offense, they sition. Bob Hume, John Fratan-
Sshould present a strong challenge gelo, Bob Newman, Bo Wood and
to the Wolverines in their home Jimmy Masino are all first-rate
opener. performers.
The California game is second Many experts foresee a chain-
on this fall's schedule and nobody pionship year for the Tar Heels
knows how strong the Berekely in the ACC, but a killer schedule'
crew will be since about two-thirds which includes Notre Dame and
of the team is made up of sopho- See MSU, Page 5
mores and junior college transfers.
The backfield will be explosive
but the line will be inexperienced.
The defensive line will be big and
tough but the linebackers are
slow. Defensive standduts include
tackle Dan Goich and back
Bobby Smith.
The Bears possess one of the top
split ends in the West in Jerry
Bradley, a 155-pound speedster
who gathered in 22 passes for 360

1966 Football Schedule

17
24
1
8
15
22
29
5
12
19

SEPTEMBER
OREGON STATE
California
OCTOBER
NORTH CAROLINA
Michigan State
PURDUE
MINNESOTA
Wisconsin
NOVEMBER
ILLINOIS
NORTHWESTERN
Ohio State

HOME
Berkeley

East

HOME
Lansing
HOME
HOME

Madison
HOME
HOME
Columbus

pressed a strong wish to have the building available in January of
1967. We did everything in our power to give it to them by then,
but we found that we were unable to man the job the way we
wanted to. And then the strike hit."
The walkout of the "rodbusters," carpenters, and general labor-
ers stopped nearly all work on the Events Building immediately.
Only scattered mechanical and electrical work was completed during
the eight-week-long strike, and, most important of all, not an-ounce
of concrete was poured in that time.
The labor market in the Ann Arbor-Detroit area is
much too small for the $175 million worth of new construc-
tion that is already underway. Thus from the beginning
Spence was unable to get all the men, especially carpenters,
that he needed. After the strike was settled he was unable .
to recapture the entire crew he has previously employed;
however, the full effects of the walkout will not be felt until
this winter.
The original specifications called for the roofing supports to be
erected beginning in May in order to have an enclosed and heated
-structure in the winter so that carpenters, painters, etc. could work.
Unfortunately, the supports began to go up two weeks ago, and
therefore it seems unlikely that the roof will be completed until late
winter at the earliest. The weather will then determine to a consid-
erable extent what progress will be made in the coming few months,
but should the roof be delayed plastering will be delayed, 'which will
delay painting, which will delay . . . , which will delay . . . .
Because of the strike, the two-month layoff rendered the Janu-
ary 1967 date as impossible to meet as the "Cazzie's Palace" date of
nine months ago. The actual contract date of May 2, 1967 then
seemed like the best bet until an unfortunate accident occurred on
August 18.
One of the roof trusses, which tips the bathroom scales
at 120 TONS broke the cable holding it as it was being low-
ered into place. One massive end lashed downwards cutting
the concrete wall like butter for about seven feet (as can be
seen in the picture).
The damage could have been much worse, according to Crisler,
who explained that the truss landed in an area "where its fall was
broken by two columns. If it had landed a few feet either side of
where it did, the thing might have split the wall all the way to the
coneourse. As it is. Spence will have to remove and repour concrete

with appearances in Ann Arbor1
slated for Sept. 17 and Oct. 1 re-
spectively.
Of the seven Big Ten contests
on this year's schedule, only three
will be away games. The farthest i
game scheduled is only some 300
miles from home, a late-October
battle in Madison with Wisconsin's
Badgers.I
For years it has been considered
that competition in the Big Ten
is the best in the nation and this
season should be no exception.
The Wolverine schedule will be
tough, with only Indiana and
Iowa missing from the agenda.
Beavers First
The season's action will com-
mence with the Oregon State en-,
counter. This will be . the first
meeting between the two teams!

the return of quarterback Paul
Brothers and halfback Bobby
Grim. Brothers slumped last year
after leading the Beavers to the
Rose Bowl as a sophomore, but an
improved receiving corps should
spell a return to top form this
year,
Getting Better
Overall, the Beavers appear to

yards last year.
The final non-Conference oppo-
nent this fall will be North Caro-
lina. The Tar Heels will arrive in
Ann Arbor with a powerful aggre-
gation headed by triple-threat
quarterback Dan Talbott. He led
the Atlantic Coast Conference in
scoring with 70 points last season
and gained almost 1500 yards
through his combined rushing and
passing efforts. He is also an ex-
cellent place' kicker and punter;
last year he booted five field goals.
The rest of the backfield is exper-
ienced but soph Dick Wesolowski
is given a good chance to become
a starter at halfback.

12-
14
15
16
17
18.
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
48
49
50
51
52
53
43
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
j70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
88
89

Hoey, George
Jobe, Theodore
*Bass, Mike
Wedge, Robert
*Sharpe, Ernest
*Sygar, Richard
*Ward, Carl
Thomas, John
Kieta, Robert
Brown, Dennis
McVey, Martin
*Clancy, J. (Capt.)
Seiber, James
Hartman, Gerald
*Vidmer, Richard
Lynch, John
Beemer, Dennis
Doty, Alfred
Lancaster, George
*Radigan; Timothy
*Fisher, David
Morgan, Dennis
Reynolds, John
Adam,. Robert
Leslie, Kent
Beier, Michael
Doane, Thomas
Johnson, Ronald
*Lee, Louis
Thompson, R.
*Rowser, John
Nelson, Douglas
Spencer, Royce
Schwartz, Thomas
*Detwiler, James
*Volk, Richard
*Dehlin, Barry
*D'Eramo, Paul
*Wright, Kenneth
Knapp, George
Frysinger, Terry
*Bailey, Donald
Buzynski, John
Danhof, Jerry
I*Dayton, Joseph
*Nunley, Frank
Baumgartner, R.
Broadnax, Stanley
*Johnson, Paul
' *Mielke, Robert
E*Hanna, Henry
SGoss, Thomas
*Hardy, William
Yanz, Richard
Kunsa, Joseph
) O'Donnell, R.
) Porter, Datid
Hribal, James
*Phillips, R.
Mair, Peter
Monthei, Dennis
Williamson, R.
Penksa, Robert
Byers, David
Denzin, David
Cartwright, H.
D *Kemp, Stanley
*Pullen, Thomas
Heffelfinger, J.
*Rosema, Roger
Kramer, Jon
*Wilhite, Clayton
Humphries, D.
Sipp, Warren
Salmi, Terry

Pos.
HB
HB
HB
HB
HB
HB,
HB
QB.
QB
QB
HB
E
QB
HB
QB
HB
QB
HB
C
FB
FB
LB
FB
LB
FB
HB
HB
HB
HB
E
HB
HB
E
HB
HB
HB
LB
LB
T
G
C
G
C
C
C
LB
G
T
T
T
G
G
T
G
G
T
G
T
T
T
G
T
T
T
T
T
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E

Ht.
5-10
6-0
6-0
6-2
5-11
5-11
5-9
6-1
6-0
5-10
5-11
6-1
5-10
6-1
6-1
5-10
5-10
5-10
6-1
5-11
5-10
5-11
5-10
5-10
6-0
5-11
5-10
6-1
6-2
6-1
6-0
6-0.
6-1
6-1
6-3
6-3
5-11
5-10
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-0
6-4
6-3
6-2
6-2
6-0
6-0
6-0
6-1
6-0
6-2
6-1
6-1
6-0
6-1
6-3
6-0
6-3
6-4
6-2
6-4
6-1
6-3
6-2
6-3
6-1
6-3
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-2
6-1
6-1

Wt.
172
178
180
198
191
185
178
192
177
175
195
192
183
165
185
180
155
195
188
206
215
230
218
200
213
200
207
189
195
209
183
180
210
199
215
192
200
208
230
210
210
225
230
235
220
218
215
230
237
223
220
225
233
212
207
215
237
220
228
233
198
225
225
235
225
250
185
203
203
214,
213
210
190
226
200

CLINTON JONES

Class
Soph.
Soph.
Sr.
Soph.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
Jr.
Soph
Soph.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Soph
Jr.
Soph
Soph
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
Jr.

Home Town
Flint
Toledo, O.
Ypsilanti
Port Huron
Palos Hghts., Ill.
Niles, 0.
Cincinnati, O.
Walled Lake
Chicago, 111i.
Lincoln Park
Odessa, Texas
Detroit
Niles, 0.
Ann Arbor
Greensburg, Pa.
. Chicago, Ill.
Ann Arbor
Mt. Morris
Struthers, 0.
Lansing
Kettering, 0.
Phoenixville, Pa.

Timberlake Out But Peace In
As Pros Stop Money Battle

Soph. Gr. Pte. Woods
Soph. Akron, O.
Jr. Ann Arbor
Soph. Freemont, O,
Soph. Wauseon, 0.
Soph. Detroit
Sr. Willow Grove, Pa.
Soph. Kalamazoo
Sr. Detroit
Jr. Adrian
Jr. Chicago, Ill.
Soph. Adrian
Sr. Toledo, 0.
Sr. Wauseon, O.
Sr. Flushing
Jr. Youngstown, .0.
Sr. Bay City
Sr. Bay City
Soph. Ecorse
Sr. Greensburg, Pa.
Sr. Harper Woods
Sr. Detroit
Jr. Detroit
Sr. Belleville
Soph. Chicago, Ill
Jr. Cincinnati, 0.
Jr. Bay City
Sr. Chicago, Ill.
Sr. Youngstown, 0.
Jr. Knoxville, Tenn.
Sr. Detroit
Soph. Chicago, Ill.
So. W. Braddock, Pa.
Sr. Milan
Jr. Lansing
Sr. . Dearborn
Jr. Evanston, Ill.
Sr. Allentown, Pa.
Jr. Detroit
Jr. East Detroit
Soph. Nile, 0.
Jr.. Warren
Soph. Xenia, 0.
Sr. - Detroit
Sr. Greenville
Jr. Ottawa, Can.
Jr. Battle Creek
Jr. Grand Rapids
Soph. Toledo, 0.
Sr. Bay City
Jr. Detroit
Soph. Akron, O.
Jr. .Wakefield

By HOWARD KOHN
Last fall, the two professional
football leagues played the final
round of roulette in the high-stake
casino where the clubs gambled
for college football players-like
Bill Yearby and Tom Mack-and
lost either their draft choice or a
stiff percentage of the year's prof-
its.
And Tuesday, Bob Timberlake
played out his final hand with the
New York Giants at their training
camp where the Giants decided to
stick -with "a pair" and put Tim-
berlake on waivers.
Things like that happen in pro
football.
The historic merger of the Na-
tional and American Football
Leagues this summer ended a
money war that had escalated into
a name - calling, back - stabbing
conflagration. For a few combus-

(outside of Canada), which puts
the pressure back on the player.
Of course, there has always been
a demanding, squeezing force on
the rookie once he starts playing
for a living. Mistakes mean money
in the big leagues.
It may seem paradoxical, but
even though he represents a high
financial investment, a new play-

er still has to "put out or get out."
And when some 260-pound line-
man crashes through the line, and
neatly out-psyches you on the
fake pass-run around the end
manuever that used to work so
well against the Green Giants
from Moo-U, you know that the
roses have faded.
So Timberlake, the Rose Bowl
hero from the 1964 Big Ten cham-
pion Michigan team and the third
round draft choice of the Giants
two years ago, sat on the bench
most of last season and read
Wanted Ads that applied to nice
young men who had the weekend
off.
There were two other quarter-
backs - Earl Morrall and Gary
Wood-who understood the deep-i
back passing techniques of the
pros; and roll-out run-happy'
miha-a 1 a hftr t Alf-

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