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September 01, 1966 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-09-01

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PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1966

RAGE TEN THE MICHIGAN DAILV THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,1968

Sorority Rush Starts Advises Social Balance
I Iner New !'.tem Hatcher Hails Freshmen,

ir

11.J 1l!" i1 .L 1 L f T i,..l j C7 4lJlll

By AVIVA KEMPNER
Fall sorority rush begins today
with an estimated 1200 women
registered to participate in the
three week program.
The new single rush system rep-
resents Panhellenic Association's
successful attempt to reduce the.
two formal rushing periods to one.
Panhel advocated this change last
semester after studying the prob-
lems of rush in committees, and
deciding that one rush was better
for the sorority system.
Student Government Council
approved this as a constitutional
change, a necessary procedure for
such actions. Late last semester,
however, Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs Richard L. Cutler
called for a Committee on Refer-
ral to review SGC's approval of
the new rush policies.
Cutler wanted three points in-
volving the rush system to be
studied, including:
-the effect of formal rush's
involvement on the grades and
emotions of freshmen in the fall;
-the attitudes of faculty mem-
bers.
After considering the rush
change the Committee on Refer-
ral, which serves as an advisory
group to Cutler, advised that he

should sustain SGC's approval
the rush plan.

of

After final approval was given to
the rush change, definite plans1
were made to prepare freshman
women for fall rush.
During the summer months
Panhel officers, especially Rush
Coordinator Marty Wetzel, '67N,
sent out literature about the soror-
ity system at University of Michi-
gan to entering freshmen women
and their parents. Women were
shown slides about sororities on
campus during orientation.
Commenting on the information
the women received Miss Wetzel
said, "Our summer program
should have given the women
enough material to help them in
making a decision about the sor-
ority .system. This preview is as
good or better than the knowledge
gained after living on campus for
a semester."
Houses may be unable to fill
their quotas during this rushing
period or because of losses due to
women getting poor grades or
married. In such cases Panhel will
then allow the houses to have
open bidding. Women will be
rushed in an informal way
through the Panhel Office.

Welcoming freshmen to the Uni- vironments he loses touch with
versity Monday night, President the pulse of the University, Robin-
Harlan Hatcher urged them to at- sof told the freshmen not* to be-
tan a "balance of social fronts" come apathetic and give up their
in order to function effectively right-of self-government.
in modern society with a mini- Robinson voiced his opinion that
mum of irrational emotional dis- the focal point of the relation-
plas.fclpon fte eain
pay s.ship between the University and
Every studentp resent was told the society should be the aiding
he is capable of success at the of students in the changing world
University. Since 90 per cent of I by the institution.
the entering class this year came _
from the top quarter of its high
school and 90 per cent scored well
above the national average on
Scholastic Aptitude Tests, Presi-
dent Hatcher voiced his confidence
in them.
But again he urged them to de- Use
velop as "whole human beings"
and make use of the varied op-
portunities available on campus
to do this.
Preceding the President's ad-D i
dress, SGC President Edward Rob-
inson spoke on what each fresh-
man and upperclassman should I
expect of the University.Cs
Calling the freshman class the
"motivating force of a growing:
institution," Robinson urged the
audience to learn to think and to
be 'aware of what is going on
around them at the University.
Pointing out that if one fails
to be aware of his different en- -
ONE-DAY SERVICE ON
DRY CLEANERS

1

4

Organizations Sell Selves
In Order To Lure Members

"The House
of Quality"

We do all types
of laundry

By STEPHEN FIRSHEIN
Twangy rock n' roll music, re-
freshments, free pamphlets, and
eager, milling crowds gave Activi-
ties Day an almost carnival-like
atmosphere.
Some 41 campus organizations-
as! various as the Interfraternity
Council, Panhellenic Association,
Karate Club, Gilbert and Sullivan
Society, Young Socialist Alliance,
Young Americans for Freedom,
and The Daily-set up tables in
the Union ballroom to hawk their
wares and sign up prospective
members.
Betty Curly, '67, overall coordi-
nator for the affair said that
"many groups rely on Activities
Day for a good part of their mem-
bership. This is the largest turn-
out of clubs that we've had for a
long time." The project, linked to
the orientation festivities, is un-
der the aegis of the University
Services Committee of the UAC.
According to Miss Curly, the in-
terested political, religious, and
"hobby" clubs sign up for tables
in the spring before the following
school year. The affair itself re-
quires months of planning, and
"considerably more work than a
dlance."
In addition, the participating
organizations are encouraged to
fill out suggestion sheets after-
wards to help UAC evaluate the
effectiveness of the event.
Wandering around the ballroom
floor, one could not help being
struck by the wide variety of or-
ganizations. In one corner, Kathy
Zemens, '69, of the Young Ameri-
cans for Freedom, explained that
their increased number of sign-
ups indicated that "people are
waking up to the derogatory lib-
eral influence provided by the ma-
jority of politicians."
For 50-cents the curious could
explore this notion further in "Up
From Liberalism," by William F.)
Buckley, Jr.
Seated on the opposite side of
the room, Young Socialists dis-,
played pamphlets on "Black Pow-
er," "America's Road to Social-
ism," "War and Revolution in Viet

Nam," "Germ Warfare Research
for Viet Nam."
Both Democratic and Republi-
can tables reportednsignificant
gains from last year in sign-ups,
due partly to congresisonal elec-
tions in the fall.
Steve Handler, '68, of the Young
Democrats, said he was aiming for
a total membership of over 600,
conceding that reduced dues were
a contributing factor to the four-
fold increase. Robert Gorsine, '69,
campus affairs chairman for the
GOP noted that sign-ups were
running about double from a year
ago.i
The Voice-SDS table was a fo-
cal point of interest, because of
the recent HUAC subpoena of its
membership list. A spokesman
said that there was no way to tell
whether' prospective members had
been scared away, but that sign-
ups for the SDS mailing list seem-
ed about normal. He added that
many students had expressed an-
ger at the subpoena and sympathy
for the members' predicament.
A more humorous note was
struck by the Gargoyle's attention-
getter-a huge pile of empty beer
cans (predominantly "Schlitz Malt
Liquor"). Prospective Swifts were
met by satirical jests from the
representatives, and tried not to
laugh too hard, presumably be-
cause they were afraid of knock-
ing down the pyramid behind the
table. With typical Rabelaisian
gusto, a member of the Garg ex-
plained that sign-ups were going
well.
Welcome
Students!
* DISTINCTIVE
COLLEGIATE
For MEN-
HAIRSTYLING
And Women-
7 Hairstylists
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

DIAL 662-0198
Corner William and Maynard Sts.-Ann Arbor, Mich.
WEDGWOOD BEADS
.4 coniinuinq Pa ckion o1 cra/iimran It i
C8
schar derer
ON S. OMINYCRSITY
AlNt ARSRUOA. ?45H~cin'

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL and PANHELLENIC ASSN.
PRESENT
F RRANTE ANA TEICHER
DOUBLE PLAY
HILL AUDITORIUM
SATURDAY, SEPT. 17, 8:30 P.M.
BLOCK SALES SEPT. 9
INDIVIDUAL SALES START SEPT. 12

PRICES: $3.25, $2.75, $2.25

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Back to class?
Go with class!

-*

GO HONDA!
Just the ticket for campus traffic, crowded
parking lots or just plain fun. And, instead of
walking her to class, you can ride her to class!
-Hondas are more fun than a barrel of coeds.
See all the Honda models (there's one just
right for you) at

anWNTWWN HONDA1H

r State st.

t- --t

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II DI/1 St I! I

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