100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. JANUARY 1.1. 1997

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 11 L AV Ja\ ,A;Cy \ 1J, 1O?'

i

Cinematic Skills Highlight Romantic Film

Congress To Hold Extensive Hearings
On Selective Service Law Revision

4

By ELLENP. FRANK
The plot of "A Man and a
Woman," which opened yesterday
at the Campus theatre, could eas-
ily have been the product of a
semi-fertile Hollywood imagina-
tion. A handsome sports car driver
meets a beautiful film editor at
the country school . where both
send their children. With zealous
dedication he overcomes her men-
tal .hindrances and of course, they
fall in love.
But every tale needs a com-
plcation, and "A. Man and a
Woman" abundantly provides it.
The "man" is -a widower, the
"woman" a widow, and the film
focuses around his difficulties in
overcoming her grief and dedica-
tion to her late husband.
Acros
Campus
FRIDAY, Jan. 13
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. -- Cinema
Guild will present Jean-Luc Go-
dard's "Alphaville" in the Arch..
Aud.
7:00 and 9:00' p.m.- Cinema
II will present "Charade" in
Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The University Sym-
pathy Band, conducted by Prof.
William D. Revelli, will perform
in Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, JAN. 14
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Jean-Luc Go-
dard's "Bande a Part" in the
Arch. Aud.
7:00 and 9:00 p.n.-Cinema II
will present "Charade'" in Aud. A.
7:00 and 9:30 p.m.-Henry Man-
cini will perform in Hill Aud.

As the title of the film suggests,
the differences between male and
female are remarkably portrayed.
The woman is hesitant, reflective,
overwhelmingly tied to a beauti-
fully romantic past. In contrast
the man is decisively aggressive,
acknowledging his love for his
dead wife, yet recognizing the
needs and emotions of the present.
The film would be nothing if it
were to rely on this on this plot.
But the director; Claude Lelouch,
almost brilliantly managed to save
the film with new, sometimes uni-
que cinematic techniques.
Primarily, "A Man and a"
Woman" displays remarkable color
and camera work. Black and white
are alternated with color and tonal
shadings to vary with the the-

matic structure. Transitions are
smooth, sometimes unnoticed, but
continually significant.
Color is consistent in the scenes
where the hero or heroine are
alone with their children, for here
is the living part of the memory
for their deadhusband or wife.
Color also follows in her recol-
lections of her husband. However,
his rememberances are in black
and white, darkened, perhaps by
his guilt in her death.
Mood is captured and held in
those scenes of hesitant inter-
action between the man and the
woman. Conversation is often dif-
ficult; the only bright element is
the potential, held back by her
memories of her husband.
Tonal shadings are equally im-
portant. Outstanding are theI

scenes of him driving at night
in the Monte Caro rally; black and
white appears to be the motif
until bright yellow headlights
emerge. Later, a goping love scene,
shaded in red, tonally illustrates
her reluctance to love.
Lelouc adds a richly romantic
musical score to the color and
camera work, skillfully using music
and songs to supplant and replace
dialogue.
Photographic skills, music and
some good acting combine with
the plot to produce a worthy film.
Though it has it flaws and dis-
stractions (ignore the unsubtle
advertising for Ford Motor Com-
pany), "A Man and a Woman" is
gloiously romantic, enjoyable and
well done.

rfDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,
.r. . . .. . . .

(Continued from page 1)
was estimated this could be ac-
complished for $4 billion yearly.
Detractors point out that Pen-
tagon estimates have put the cost
of an all-volunteer Army at as
much as $17 billion yearly and add
that there is no way of predicting
what makes a young man choose
a career.
Few expect this suggestion to
get serious attention from Con-
gress, but a resolution calling for
further studies may gain approval.
* Universal military training.
This suggestion, although recently
endorsed by former President
Dwight D. Eisenhower, also has
little populair support, with many
attacking it as unnecessary and
wasteful in this day of relatively
small guerrilla wars. The Defense
Department also has estimated it
would cost more than $6 billion to
provide six months of training for
the 1.8 million youths who would
theoretically be eligible for the
training this year.
Hershey is a strong advocate of
the program.
* Compulsory national service.
Advocates of this progam include
PeaceCorps Director Jack H.
Vaughn, Secretary of Labor W.
Willard Wirtz and Sargent Shri-
ver, head of the antipoverty pro-
gram. Under it, youths would be
given a chance at the age of 18
to volunteer for either military or
nonmilitary national service.
Critics argue that compulsory
national service would just pro-
vide another foi'm of coercion for
a society that already is struggling
with the draft. To expose all
youths to possible federal control

many citizens.3
. The lottery. Insiders say this
is the alternative program with
the best chance of gaining some
kind of congressional sanctions
this year. Its backers include Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.);
his brother, Sen. Robert F. Ken-
nedy (D-N.Y.), and Secretary of
Defense Robert S. McNamara.
Under the Kennedy proposal,
all men would be examined by
their local draft boards at age 18,
and those found fit would be as-
signed a lottery number. Draftees

tional drawing determined, in
part, by the needs of the nation.
Under the Pentagon version,
only those 19-year-olds who had
not been deferred-that is, those
men classified 1A would be eligible
for the lottery. Those who had
been deferred would enter the 1A
pool when their deferments ran
out.
The four major alternatives all
share one common idea: that the
present draft system should be
overhauled to begin taking young-
est men first.

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINALI -NY. TIMES
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Friday 7, 9, and 11
nn Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

i*

The Daily Offilcal Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday. and Sunday, General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-8429.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 13
Day Calendar
Midwestern Music Conference-- Hill
Aud., 1 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.E
Cinema II - "Charade" with Cary
Grant: Aud. A, Angell Hall, 7 and 9
p.m.

at the age of 18 is repugnant toI would then be selected by a na-

School of Music Concert-University
Symphony Band, William D. Revelli,
conductor: Hill Audi, 8:30 p.m.
Southern Asia Club-Meeting at 12
noon in the Commons Room of Lane
Hall. There will be an election of new
officers. Anyone interested in South or
Southeast Asia is invited to attend.
Psychology Colloquium--Robyn Dawes,
University of Michigan, "Mixed Group
Analysis and a Surprising Application:
Is Lung Cancer Related to Cigarette
Smoking Per Se?" Aud. B, Angell Hall,
4:15 p.m. Coffee will be served from
3:45 to 4:15 in 3417 Mason Hall.
Astronomical Colloquium-H. Albers,
Phone 482-2056'
-xAmce On CARPENTER RADa
NOW SHOWING OPEN 6:30 P.M.
--FREE HEATERS-

ARK COFFEE'HOSE
1421 Hill
presents
THE GREAT NEW SOUND OF
Leaves of Grass
Friday, 9 P.M.
$1.00 cover charge for all you can eat

a

H. Aller, F. Haddock and P. Wehinger,
Astronomy Department, will speak on
"The UCLA Meeting of the American
Astronomical Society," Fri., Jan. 13, 4
p.m., Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Room
807.
General Notices
Attention Students: Those who with-
draw from Ann Arbor schools and col-
leges of the University between Jan.
20 and Feb. 17, 1967, will besassessed
a disenrollment fee of $30 or shall for-
feit 50 per cent of the assessed fee,
whichever is larger. The withdrawal
form, No. 615, must be dated not later
than Feb. 17 to qualify for the refund.
Students having a notice dated after
Feb. 17 will be assessed the full term
fee.
If you attempt to "drop" all courses
without selecting new ones, you are
(Continued on Page 8)

Read and Use
Daily yClassifieds

"A BEAUTIFUL FILM"-The New Yorker

KAPPA SIGMA
Birthday Open House
King George & his Royal Subjects
direct from the Town Bar
Doc Lash will cut the 200-piece cake

GRAND PRIZE WINNER-
1966' CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL
CLAUDE GIROUSI
PRESENOTS
A MAN
ANd A WOMWAN

Shown
at
7:15
12:00
ALSO-

YIES! TONIGHT!li
Mil
TOM RUSH
elektro records recording artist

'4
F
'4

s

r

Shown at 8:40 Only

DIAL
8-6416

NOW
Next:
P.M. Summer"

Fri., 3th

4-6 P.M.

806 Hill

NEVADA IMITM
PLUS-THIRD BIG FEATURE
"MORO WITCH DOCTOR"
Shown at 10:50 Only

I

I

, ... _
' 1

Dial NO 2-6264

! ENDS TONIGHT e
d1:00-3:00-50 5

+ Use Daily Classifieds +

4

330 Maynard

;A

UAC MUSKET '67
Our
the new musical

TICKETS:
+ Block Sales
January 13
" Individual Sales

Friday, Saturday, Sunday 8:00 P.M.

1.50 per person

start
January

16

MATT HELM OUTDOES MATT HELM
IN HIS NEW ALL-OUT ADVENTURE!

Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
All Seats $2.50
Performances:
Date:
Fri.-Sun., Jan. 27-29
Wed.-Sat., Feb. 1-4

I.

Starting February 17-"THE SOUND OF MUSIC"

III

I

I

I

-61111 IUILD-
FESTIVAL WEEK
OF
JEAN-LUC GODARD
TONIGHT
ALPHAVILLE
His comic-book plot has all
the predictability of its
ageless prototype, yet what
we see on the screen is
perpetual surprise
CAT A T nAV rU C,( { N AY

4

I

IT 4 I nflEci p IN RwO

,_I

C A sM ls nM

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan