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April 09, 1967 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-09

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SUNDAY, APRIL 9,,1967

THE MICHIGAN- 11~iiW

SUND Y, PRI 9,1 6..?I -. Ta = '., aa - ,%IN L. la, K

PAGE SEVEN

4

Thinclads Set

VP!'

Nine

Orbits

Titans

Twice

Meet1
By PHIL BROWN
Special To The Daily
LEXINGTON, Ky.-- Michigan's
thinclads copped two firsts, a sec-
ond, two thirds and two fourths
in yesterday's windup of the Ken-
tucky Relays.
Wolverines accounted for two of
the 12 field records set. No team
standings are recorded in the
meet.
A world record performance by
Western Michigan's shuttle hurdle
relay team highlighted the day's
competition. WMU's clocking of
0:56.7 erased both 'the American
and world marks, previously
0:57.4 and 0:57.2 respectively.
Tennessee's second place time
of 0:56.9 also surpassed the exist-
ing standards.
Escalation
Michigan's sophomore G a r y
Knickerbocker cleared 6'8" in the
high jump to better the old record
by an inch. Illinois' Jim Borton
reached the same height but fin-
ished in second place, having more
misses.
Jack Harvey won the shot put
competition with a heave of 5T7",
but failed to better his own mark
of 58'6'/" set during Friday's
preliminaries.
Ernst Soudek, of the Ann Arbor
Track Club, outdistanced his rivals
in the discus final with a record
toss of 181'1", It was the fourth
time in as many years that Sou-
dek won the meet title in this
event.
Michiga~n's two-mile relay team,
composed of Tom Kearney, John
Reynolds, Alex MacDonald and
Ron Kutschinski, finished a very
close second behind Tennessee in
one of yesterday's finest races.
Both Tennessee's 7:27.7 clocking
and Michigan's 7:28.5 broke the:
mark of 7:32.6 set by Ohio Uni-
versity in 1965.
Third in Mile
Bob Gerometta replaced Reyn-
olds for the, Wolverines' third-
place effort in the mile relay,
while Tennessee won. the event
with a time of 3:12.5. Southern
Illinois' 3:13.6 clocking gave the
Salukis second place.
Kentucky State junior Clarence
Ray, who ran a blistering 0:09.2
on Friday, won the 100-yard dash
final with a time of 0:09.7. He was
not disappointed with the time
however, and remarked that "I
was running to win today. I didn't
expect to go as fast as yesterday."
When asked about his goal for
the season, he commented, "I want
to run against the big guys."
His only previous competition
against well-known sprinters was
at the NCAA Indoor Meet at De-
troit, when he failed to make the
finals.
Tennessee's Richmond Flowers
also failed to improve on his time
of 0:13.5 set during Friday's 120-
yard semi-finals in the high
hurdles. A head wing held him to
a time of 0:14.0 in yesterday's
Frosh Excel
In Gym eet
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING - Michigan's
freshmen gymnasts performing
in the shadow of the varsity's sec-
ond place finish in the NCAA
championships, grabbed the spot-
light yesterday with an over-
whelming victory in the Michigan
Gymnastics Association Meet.
Michigan, with six firsts in seven
events, topped runner-up Central
Michigan 140 to 75. Michigan
State's frosh followed in third
with 54 points.
Wolverine winners were:
Parallel bars-Ron Rapper, 9.2:

high bar-Sid Jensen, 8.95; rings
- Jensen, 9.0; vaulting - Gary
Balcombe, 9.25; trampoline-Don
Portman, 8.95; all-around - Jen-
sen, 51.05.

4ecords
finals, but that was still good
enuogh to give him a comfortable
margin (0.4 second) over Bob
White of Indiana. Wolverine Nel-
son Graham skimmed the sticks
in 14.7 seconds to grab fourth
place in the event.
Assistant coach Dave Martin,
comented that he was "pleased"V
with his team's performance in the
first outdoor meet of the season.
Matson Misses
World Records
COLLEGE STATION, Tex. UP)-
Randy Matson, Texas' A&M's
world-record shot putter, had his
greatest double yesterday when he
threw the shot 70'51/2" and the
discus 213'9", both hovering on
world records.
Competing in a triangular meet
with Texas Christian and Baylor,
Matson threw the shot better
than 70' three times. His best
throw was 1%" under his world
record of 70'7%/" and marked the'
fifth time he has exceeded 70'.
His discus heave lacked only
2%" of the world record of 213'-
11%" held by Ludvik Donek of
Czechoslovakia.
PLAYOFF ACTION:

By JOEL BLOCK
Michigan coach Moby Benedict
had a hard time picking the stars
of yesterday's 11-0 and 3-1 tri-
umphs over Detroit.
"Third baseman Glenn Redmon
was outstanding," said Benedict in
the locker room after the 5%2-
hour twin bill. Redmon was five
for seven for the day, collecting
three doubles, knocking in two
runs, and scoring five runs him-
self.
In addition, Redmon started
two rally-killing double plays
from his hot corner spot and
took another sure double from
Titan first baseman Ty Havard
President Johnson may avoid
taking sides in baseball's in-
vasion of the North Monday
when the Washington Senators
host the New York Yankees at
1:30. Official sources indicate
that trouble - shooter Hubert
Humphrey will throw out the
first pitch.
in the second game when he made
a diving stab of line drive over
third base.
Adding Flavor
"But Keith Spicer also had a
good day and both Les Tanona
and Rick Sygar picked up four
hits each," added Benedict.
IIndeed, clean-up man Spicer
did have a good day. The center
fielder totaled six hits and four
RBI's in eight at bats.
But Benedict wasn't through
with giving out plaudits. "Our
over-all pitching was only fair,
but you can't forget the shut-out
by Lyijynen and Guidi." Jim
Lyijynen, a senior left-hander,
hurled the first five frames and
yielded only two walks and a
broken bat single. Junior Larry

Guidi mopped up the rest of the
way, getting touched only for a
single in the sixth and a walk in
the eighth.
"All the fellows kicked out pretty
good," Benedict summed up. But
it was the Detroit infield which
was kicking itself after the first
inning of the first game.
Free Pass
After Redmon walked to open
the game, Sygar sliced a single
to right to send him to second.
Then the rain-drenched infield
grass took over.

Tanona, Spicer and catcher
Doug Nelson topped slow rollers
past the out-stretched glove of
pitcher Larry Saloi and by the
time the mist had cleared Mich-
igan had rolled up a four-run
bulge. For the next eight innings
Michigan improved its batting
averages, notching 14 safeties.
Repeat Performance
The second game opened sim-
ilarly with Redmon, Sygar, Ta-
nona, and Spicer sending four
straight shots through the infield
to bring in two runs.

Detroit's lone run of the day far to his left for a routine
came on a hit batsman and an grounder and the ball slipped un-
error by Sygar. With two out in der his mit. But the unearned run
the top of the third and runners was Detroit's only consolation for
on first and second, Sygar went their very disappointing day.
The Line Scares

FIRST GAME
Detroit 000 000 000- 0 2 4
MICHIGAN 410,004 2x-1 14 0
Salci (L, 0-1), Randy and Yeo-
mans, Moran; Lyijynen (W, 1-2),
Guidi, and Nelson.

SECOND GAME
Detroit 010 000 0-1 5 0
MICHIGAN 201 000 x-3 9 2
McKelvey (L, 0-1) and Yeomans;
Kerr, Kenkiewicz (W, 2-0) and Kraft.

SIPP, SHARPE STAR:
BluesPost 'White'-Wash

.. I'

ALEX MacDONALD

Led by the powerful running of
backs Warren Sipp and Ernie
Sharpe, Michigan's "Blue" foot-
ball squad walloped the "Whites"
Ferry Field.
Sipp, a fullback, and Sharpe, a
yesterday 35-0 in a scrimmage at
halfback, each scored two touch-
downs in the rout. A 32-yard pass
from quarterback Dick Vidmer to
end Jim Berline accounted for the
other tally.
Sophomore place-kicker Mike
Hankwitz converted on all five
extra points. Hankwitz will be
likely successor to Rick Sygar, who
holds the Big Ten mark for con-
secutive conversations from place-
ment.
Over and In
The first touchdown was scored
by Sipp on a one-yard plunge
early in the contest. Later, the
big fullback set up the Berline
touchdown pass with a 40-yard
run.
Sharpe's first score was on a 20-
yard gallop and came after a key

Vidmer-to-Sipp pass of 20 yards.
He added his second six-pointer
from 10 yards out following an-
other 20-yard Vidmer pass, this
one to Berline.
The final scoring drive covered
70 yards in six plays, with Sipp
going the last five for his second
TD of the afternoon.

BEFORE YOU BUY
See the
JOHN ROBERTS
College Ring
ULRICH Sr
Your Friendly Bookstore

Canadiens Roll

By The Associated Press
MONTREAL - Third - period
goals by tough John Ferguson and
elusive Ralph Backstrom carried
Montreal's torrid Canadiens to a
3-1 victory over the New York
Rangers yesterday with a 2-0 lead
in the National Hockey League
semifinal playoff series.
Ferguson, the NHL's penalty
king cracked a 1-1 tie with a
power-play goal at 7:46 of the
final period and Backstrom, who
had scored twice in Montreal's 6-4
first-game victory Thursday night,
added an insurance tally with 6%
minutes to play.
The Canadiens, who now have
an unbeaten string of 13 games
Hogan Slams
Record 66.
In Masters
AUGUSTA Ga. (W)-Bert Yan-
cey, Julius Boros and Bobby Nich-
ols wound up in a tie at 211 in an
exciting see-saw battle for first
place but an astounding 66 by the
immortal Ben Hogan, a ghost from
out of the past, provided the high
drama yesterday in the third
round of the Masters Golf Tour-
nament.
The 54-year-old Hogan, wincing
from the pain of an'ailing shoulder
and trudging along haltingly on
legs shattered by anear-fatal
automobile accident, reeled off six
birdies in the space of nine holes
in an astounding finish for a 54-
hole score of 213.
He tied two Masters records and
broke another with this brilliant
late surge.
His 213 placed him in a tie with
Gay Bremer who blew the title
by thr: 3 putting the final hole a
year ago. Brewer, one of the hot-
test articles on the spring tour,
had a par 72.
String bean George Archer, with
an eagle at the 13th,- followed at
214, shooting a par 72 and 22-
year-old Tony Jacklin, the high
school dropout from England,
bogeyed the final hole to tie Lionel
Hebert at 215. Jacklin shot 74,
Hebert 67.

beginning in the final weeks of
the regular season, resume their
drive for a third straight Stanley
'up title at New York Tuesday
night.
Hawks Rumble
ST. LOUIS - The surging St.
Louis Hawks, using a balanced
attack, handed the San Francisco
Warriors their second straight
setback 109-104 last night to dead-
lock the National Basketball As-
sociation Western Division final
playoffs at two gamhes each.
Sal Francisco's high scoring
Rick Barry, who injured his left
ankle in, the second quarter and
was used sparingly thereafter, had
only 10 points.
Joe Caldwell of St. Louis, who
injured his back slightly in a hard
fall near the end of the game,
paced St. Louis with 24 points. Big
Zelmo Beaty added 19 for the
Hawks, including 10 crucial points
in the last period.
Jeff Mullins, a one-time Hawk,
had his season's high, 40 points,
to lead the Warrior attack. Mullins
had 25 at the half.
The fifth game of the best-of-
seven series will be played in San
Francisco Monday night.
In the Eastern Division, the
Philadelphia 76'ers seek to end
Boston's long championship reign
in decisive fashion with a sweep
over the Celtics today in the
fourth game of their NBA playoff
finals.
Scares
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Minnesota 7-5, Concordia Lutheran
(lowi) 2-1
Illinois (Chicago) 5-1, Northwestern
2-3
Iowa at Western Illinois (2, cancelled)
Ball State 6-1, Michigan State 4-3
Wisconsin 17-12, North Central Illinois
2-0
Southern California 3, Arizona 0
Ohio State 8-0, Cincinnati 4-2
Indiana 7, Northern Illinois 3
ALL-STAR BASKETBALL
North 113, South 110
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Houston 2, New York (A) 0
Atlanta 4, Minnesota 0
Cleveland 8, Cinci nati 5
Washington 7, St. Louis 4
Boston 6, Detroit 2
New York (N) 4, Baltimore 0
Chicago (N) 8, Chicago (A) 5
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 3
Los Angeles 4, Kansas City 2
California 6, San Francisco 3 (16 inn)

v

APRIL.9.

7 P.M

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an actual attempt at black-white
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"A.
./

HOPWOOD LECTURE
ROBERT BRUSTEIN.
Dean, Yale School of Drama
Critic for the New Republic
Author of: The Theater o f Revolt
Seasons of Discontent
j
CLASSICAL ACTIONS, MODERN EYES
Announcement of the Hopwood Awards
for 1967 will follow the lecture

DONT DELAY!
Follett's will pay
R G MfNlV

Make your break for used books
early and avoid
the rush.No one, but no one should miss out o
And extra cash is the good thing you
on if you haven't brought in your use
Follett's yet. We give extra cash beca
we are part of a large operation and
books to stay that way. We'll even bi
wn'I-ha , earlnn this'2mri ,cnext

law I

P9740
4K
1' 40
4
Wlll
494
,at

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 8:00 P.M.'
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

on a good thing.
i'll miss out
d textbooks to
use, frankly
it needs your
uy books that
semester. The
to make on

A- t,-

more books we get, the less we havet

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