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April 08, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, APRIL 8,1987

THE MICHIGI fX DAILY

LLt 5Ld OE.VLtirA

SATURDAY, APRIL 8,1967 TUE 1~HCUIGA ~ DAILY

rAUE NLVLN

Rebel Thinclads Rally 'Round Records

rHarv ey, Ray,
flowers Set
Meet Marks
By PHIL BROWN
Special To The Daily
LEXINGTON, Ky.-"Relax" is
the word at the University of Ken-
tucky and the beautiful sprawling
campus is a persuasive invitation
for visitors to adopt it as perma-
nent policy.
You seem to feel constantly that
everyone is moving in slow mo-
tion.
It's a different matter, however,
when it comes to track.
T w o southerners yesterday
moved fast enough to erase pre-
vious records at the Kentucky Re-
lays.
Richmond Flowers, a brilliant
hurdler from Tennessee, was
clocked at 0:13.5 in his semi-final
heat of the 120-yard high hurdles,
eclipsing the meet mark of 0:13.8
and coming wthin 0:00.3 of the
world mark.
Clarence Ray, Kentucky State
sprinter, ripped off a 0:09.2 in the
100-yard dash, setting another
meet record and drawing within
0:00.1 of Bobby Hayes' world
record.
Harvey Sets Mark
In the field events, Michigan's
Jack Harvey came through with
a tremendous 58' 6%/ toss to better
his own meet mark in the shot put
by eight inches. Harvey expressed
Rugby Club
Battles OSU
Michigan's Rugby Club, without
its prize Ohio State recruit, kicks
off its spring season today in a
game at Ohio State.
Jim Bears, 220-pound former
first-string lineman on the OSU
football team, and now starring.
with the Wolverine ruggers, broke
his nose in Tuesday's warm-up
scrimmage with Michigan State.
The ruggers will host the Cleve-
land Rugby Club next Saturday
before competing in the "Big Ten
Championships" April ; 28-29 at
Bloomington.

Gridders Innovate Clinic

SWING TO MUSIC
THE NEW WAY WITH A
RO BE RTS °'RO""
CUSTOM COMPACT
STEREO TAPE RECORDER

Rich Flowers

The Michigan football team will
be performing for more than just
the usual crowd of interested by-
standers this afternoon.
This last of the regular Saturday:
afternoon spring scrimmages will
be something special. High school
coaches from the entire Midwest
will be present to lend a clinic
atmosphere to the affair.
Usually Michigan Stadium is
reserved for the Maize and Blue
game. The full-blown affair that
signals the end of spring practice
is scheduled for next Saturday in
the stadium.
Today's scrimmage, normally
held on Ferry Field, will be staged
in the stadium.
Before the action starts, the
visiting coaches will be wined and
dined at a special luncheon.
Philo in Action ,
Then at 2 p.m. they get to see
how a college team plays football.
The purpose of the get-together
is to show the prep coaches what
the current college philosophy is
and to acquaint them with new
techniques.
They will be treated to the first
full-scale scrimmage of the spring,
provided the weather co-operates.
The weather has kept outdoor
work to a frustrating minimum
this season, damping most of the
scrimmages to date.
As usual, the squad will be di-
vided into whites and blues. The
front line offense gets its initial

crack at the defensive counter-
part, and the other squads will
play accordingly.
Former tight end Warren Sipp
gets another workout at the first
string fullback slot. Veteran Dick
Vidmer will be the top signal
caller.
The defensive squad is high-
lighted by a threeway battle for
the two top defensive end slots.
Senior Rocky Rosema vies against

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juniors Jon Kramer and Tom
Stincic.
Dave Porter will miss the scrim-
mage due to the East-West All-
Star wrestling dual in Stillwater,
Okla. Porter, the 1966 NCAA
heavyweight'champ, will meet this
year's title-holder, Curly Culp of
Arizona State. Another Michigan
wrestler, 152 -pound national
champion Jim Kamman will also
compete in the meet.

dissatisfaction with his effort but
a sore elbow prevented him from
improving on it.
All of the new records were set
in preliminary rounds of competi-
tion, and performances in today's
finals could well surpass these.
After yesterday's action, the
Wolverines had placed men in
final rounds for four events. In
addition to Harvey, Steve Leucht-
man and Bob Thomas, who placed
sixth and eighth respectively, will
compete in the shot put.
Nelson Graham will run against
Flowers in the 120 highs after
finishing third one of the prelim
heats.
Graham also qualified for the
300-yard intermediate hurdles
with clocking of 0:38.6-0:00.2 off
the fastest qualifying time.
Thomas, in a surprise perform-
Ance, placed first in the discus
preliminary with a heave of 162'
8". His toss was two and a half
inches better than Ernst Soudek's
best of the day.
Soudek, an ex-Wolverine now
competing for the Ann Arbor
Track Club, has been the meet
discus champion for three years
and his 1965 record of 178' 9" has
not been seriously challenged.
A rumor spread quickly after
Flower's record hurdle perform-
ance that he had pulled a ligament
and would not be able to compete
today. He personally denied the
report, however, and. asserted that
he had no intention of withdraw-
ing from the race.

Calls ee
'Autocrat'
CHAMPAIGN (/P)--Former Illi-
nois assistant basketball coach
Howie Braun told a joint commit-
tee of the Illinois state legislature
yesterday that Big Ten Commis-
sioner Bill Reed was behind the
penalties handed down in the re-
cent slush fund athletic scandal.
Braun, one of three coaches who
resignedeafter Illinois was handed
a Big Ten ultimatum to fire the
coaches or face suspension from
the conference, called Reed's
stand "autocratic."
Braun was one of several wit-
nesses to appear before the com-
mittee of five senators and five
state representatives.
Illinois Elite
Others included Dr. David D.
Henry, president of Illinois; Leslie
A. Bryan, Illinois faculty repre-
sentative; Doug Mills, former Illi-
nois athletic director who resigned
a couple of weeks before the scan-
dal broke in mid-December; and
Steve Kuberski, one of several
athletes who were suspended for
receiving illegal aid from the $21,-
000 fund.
Braun said he thought that
Reed set the penalties and then
the member schools went along
with him.

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PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Re*. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY 1:
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

- I ,, CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.

PCNANAONI
BY MA SUSHITA ELECTRIO
swing into spring . . .
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as they battle for the Pennant. You're in the ball park for every game!
They're perfect for your kind of fun-picnics, grassers, trips, you name it!

Vi:

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.--Evening Prayer.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 am.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:15 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "I Don't Want to Get Involved."
5:45 p.m.-Dinner and Program. Meet in
Wesley Lounge to go to Presbyterian Cen-
ter for joint meeting. Program is the film,
"A Time For Burning."
TUESDAY
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. The Rev. Ned Dewire of De-
troit Conference Board of Missions and
Church Extension, will speak on the Inner
City. Dinner follows in Pine Room.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.ri.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Contemporary
Liturgy.
7:00 p.m.-Open house.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles lohnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-,-U. Fellowship Coffee Pressession.
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Study.
11:00 a.m.-"The Wisdom of Praying for Wis-
dom."
7:00 p.m.-Rev. Jay Stevans, Director of
Christian Education, Lower Michigan Bap-
tist Conference.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. - Worship
Services.
Sunday at 11:15 a.m.-Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper
and Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
6:00 p.m.-Troining Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednndav Prover Meeting at 7:30 n.m.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewuod
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
1 1 :00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.

services-Call

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CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship in
Music. Cantata by Chancel Choir. "Lam-

ALDERSGATE STUDENT
FEL I LWCIPd ...TA -IE ANNIJ ADRD

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